A Social Revolution

Politics and the Welfare State in Iran
Author: Kevan Harris
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520280822
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 330
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For decades, political observers and pundits have characterized the Islamic Republic of Iran as an ideologically rigid state on the verge of collapse, exclusively connected to a narrow social base. In A Social Revolution, Kevan Harris convincingly demonstrates how they are wrong. Previous studies ignore the forceful consequences of three decades of social change following the 1979 revolution. Today, more people in the country are connected to welfare and social policy institutions than to any other form of state organization. In fact, much of Iran’s current political turbulence is the result of the success of these social welfare programs, which have created newly educated and mobilized social classes advocating for change. Based on extensive fieldwork conducted in Iran, Harris shows how the revolutionary regime endured through the expansion of health, education, and aid programs that have both embedded the state in everyday life and empowered its challengers. This focus on the social policies of the Islamic Republic of Iran opens a new line of inquiry into the study of welfare states in countries where they are often overlooked or ignored.

Fascism and Social Revolution


Author: R. Palme Dutt
Publisher: Wildside Press LLC
ISBN: 1434405729
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 6290
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Contemporary Literature and Social Revolution


Author: N.A
Publisher: Ardent Media
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 9393
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Jan Hus

Religious Reform and Social Revolution in Bohemia
Author: Thomas A. Fudge
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 085771855X
Category: History
Page: 392
View: 2511
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A century before Martin Luther and the Reformation, Jan Hus confronted the official Church and helped to change the face of medieval Europe. A key figure in the history of Europe and Christianity and a catalyst for religious reform and social revolution, Jan Hus was poised between tradition and innovation. Taking a stand against the perceived corruption of the Church, his continued defiance led to his excommunication and he was ultimately burned at the stake. What role did he play in shaping Medieval Europe? And what is his legacy for today?

Social Revolution . . . .


Author: Leslie Herzberger
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1413455883
Category: Social Science
Page: 182
View: 7087
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The history of the United States in the last thirty years, its preoccupation with the Vietnam War and the devastating affects of that war on the psyche of this nation is evidence of a foreign policy tragedy. Foreign policy tragedy as a rule brings domestic tragedy in its wake. The purpose of this study is to work out why the approaches to social revolution--and that is what the Vietnam War was about--have been wrong on both sides of the ideological spectrum the last thirty years in the U.S., point out why they were wrong, point to where they were wrong, and point to the consequences of acting in a society, on a society, and through a society when the perceptions of that society are in certain respects wrong. Let me sum up my perception on what went wrong in Vietnam. It was a Right wing war fought on Left wing premises. It was a war that could not have been won because those who designed it would not or could not win it--but were also afraid of losing it. It was a war that was wrongly perceived by both sides of the ideological spectrum.==The Liberal argument post facto was that America tried everything and 'still' lost it!The Conservative argument post facto was that it could have been won if the opposition had not tied their hands, keeping them from an all out effort that would have been required to win it.The war was started in earnest by the Liberals under Kennedy. The strategy was to roll up the enemy by hitting on the peasant and through it, cut off the leaders. Pacification, education, re-education, indoctrination, and the introduction of 'self-defense' techniques to the South Vietnamese peasants was meant to stop the revolution exported from the North in its tracks. The U.S. policy was predicated on the assumption that the North 'or' South Vietnam peasants really had something to do with the ruling functions of the North Vietnamese revolution after Thermidor; that after the onset of Thermidor--after the 'institutionalization' of the revolution in Hanoi--the 'revolution' was still 'their' revolution.==The 'Liberal' approach has believed that revolution is tantamount to Mao's view of it in China, peasants all immersed in the revolutionary process as 'fish in the sea'. And so you would have to drain the very ocean itself to stop it. 'Our' approach to the post revolutionary process is that 'after' the onset of Thermidor, 'revolution' is a bunch of terror informed super bureaucrats at the 'center' of a society--both structurally and procedure-wise increasingly cut off from the periphery until, in the end, it is nothing but a bunch of old men in the smoke filled backrooms of the Soviets in Moscow facing the rest of the population, or in the case of North Vietnam during the Vietnam War, in Hanoi.As a rule, in a post revolutionary society, it is the 'center' that really matters upon the onset of Thermidor--not the 'small fish in the sea'. So bombing the 'small fish' into fish soup hell in response--as did the 'West' in Vietnam in that war--every tree, every outhouse, every shack, and every village, until they drop so much ordinance that the entire region is brain dead from defoliants and pockmarks and natural calamities, while leaving the 'center' untouched, would seem insane. Yet that was the policy in Vietnam of America. And then nothing happened! Nothing happened week after week, year after year except that America itself was being driven mad doing the same thing, and expecting it to come out different. That, as the new President-elect said in 1992, was and is insanity.==But what choice did they all have? The pro-war liberal American leadership that designed the war in Vietnam did not dare bomb Hanoi, the capitol of North Vietnam, for fear of triggering World War III with Red China and with Soviet Russia--both of whose client North Vietnam was. So they tied their own hands, figuring that by coming through the back door, 'fish in the sea' style, piece by piece, nobody will notice in Ch

The Indian Constitution and Social Revolution

Right to Property since Independence
Author: V. Krishna Ananth
Publisher: SAGE Publishing India
ISBN: 935150476X
Category: History
Page: 536
View: 6024
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This book highlights the evolution of India’s Constitution into a tool for social revolution, tracing the various stages through which the law on the Right to Property and its relationship with the idea of socialism—as laid out in Parts III and IV of the Constitution—have evolved. It underlines that the road to social revolution has been marked by a process where attempts to give effect to the idea of justice—social, economic, and political—as laid down in the Preamble have achieved a measure of success. If the Constitution, including the Preamble, is to be viewed as a contract that the people of India had entered into with the political leadership of the times and the judiciary being the arbitrator to ensure justice, it may be held that the scheme has worked. This book traces this history by placing the judicial and legislative measures in the larger context of the political discourse.

'Fight Club' - A model of a social revolution


Author: Johannes Hell
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638369706
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 43
View: 5586
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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: Sehr gut, University of Augsburg, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: "Fight Club - A model of a social revolution" deals with the conception and the possible impact of the revolutionary overthrow bestowed upon society in Chuck Palahniuk's debut novel. From a top-down perspective it illuminates affected areas, consequences and applicability.

Militarism and Social Revolution in the Third World


Author: Miles D. Wolpin
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 260
View: 9631
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To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.

InclusivismTM

The World on the Brink of a Social Revolution
Author: S.A. Nitz
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1426967802
Category: Social Science
Page: 228
View: 3204
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The world is currently in the middle of the most significant societal, social and cultural revolution in its history. Old leadership and social patterns are not yielding the expected results of fiscal growth and prosperity throughout the world and the widening gap between upper and lower income levels has resulted in an increased level of social unrest. The activities of various citizen's groups and anti-establishment organizations such as Wikileaks are expanding an ever-widening chasm between traditional political and societal structures and the population at large. Politicians world-wide are facing never before seen challenges - socially, economically and environmentally. Taken individually, these trials might seem manageable. Taken collectively, however, they reveal the metamorphosis of the social and political structure of society at large from one dominated by capitalism in all of its forms, to one dominated by a new and emerging social order - Inclusivism.

Right Wing Social Revolution and Its Discontent: the Dynamics of Genocide

A Case Study
Author: Leslie Herzberger
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1469100010
Category: Social Science
Page: 158
View: 6436
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The history of the United States in the last thirty years, its preoccupation with the Vietnam War and the devastating affects of that war on the psyche of this nation is evidence of a foreign policy tragedy. Foreign policy tragedy brings domestic tragedy in its wake. The purpose of this study is to work out why the approaches to social revolution--and that is what the Vietnam War was about--have been wrong on both sides of the ideological spectrum the last thirty years in the U.S., point out why they were wrong, point to where they were wrong, and point to the consequences of acting in a society when the perceptions are in certain respects wrong. Let me sum up my perception on what went wrong in Vietnam. It was a Right wing war fought on Left wing premises. It was a war that could not have been won because those who designed it would not or could not win it--but were also afraid of losing it. It was a war that was wrongly perceived by both sides of the ideological spectrum. The Liberal argument was that America tried everything and still lost it! The Conservative argument was that it could have been won if the opposition had not tied their hands, keeping them from an all out effort that would have been required to win it. The war was started in earnest by the Liberals under Kennedy. The strategy was to roll up the enemy by hitting on the peasant and through it, cut off the leaders. Pacification, education, re-education, indoctrination, and the introduction of self-defense techniques to the South Vietnamese peasants was meant to stop the revolution exported from the North in its tracks. The U.S. policy was predicated on the assumption that the peasants really had something to do with the ruling functions of the North Vietnamese revolution after Thermidor; that after the onset of Thermidor--after the institutionalization of the revolution--in Hanoi, the revolution was still revolution. The Liberal approach has believed that revolution is tantamount to Maos view of it in China--peasants all immersed in the revolutionary process as fish in the sea. And so you would have to drain the very ocean itself to stop it. Our approach to the post revolutionary process is that after the onset of Thermidor in a society, revolution is a bunch of terror informed super bureaucrats at the center of a society increasingly cut off from the periphery. In a post revolutionary society, it is the leaders that matter--not the fish in the sea. So bombing the small fish into fish soup hell in response--as did the West in Vietnam in that war--every tree, every outhouse, every shack, and every village, until they drop so much ordinance that the entire region is brain dead from defoliants and pockmarks and natural calamities, while leaving the center untouched, would seem insane. Yet that was the policy in Vietnam of America. And then nothing happened! Nothing happened week after week, year after year except that America itself was being driven mad doing the same thing, and expecting it to come out different. That, as the President-elect said in 1993, was and is insanity. But what choice did they all have? The pro-war liberal American leadership that designed the war in Vietnam did not dare bomb Hanoi, the capitol of North Vietnam, for fear of triggering World War III with Red China and with Soviet Russia--both of whose client North Vietnam was. So they tied their own hands, figuring that by coming through the back door, fish in the sea style, piece by piece, nobody will notice in China and Russia; ergo no World War III. So they took a strategy that was insane, and made a virtue out of its necessity. They tied their own hand! And then they blamed the opposition for forcing them to fight with their hands tied behind their backs. On the other h

Asan and Social Revolution in Kerala

A Study of His Assembly Speeches
Author: T. K. Ravindran,Kumāran Āśān
Publisher: Trivandrum : Kerala Historical Society
ISBN: N.A
Category: Caste
Page: 95
View: 6996
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Cutting Edge

Technology, Information Capitalism and Social Revolution
Author: Jim Davis,Thomas A. Hirschl,Michael Stack
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859841853
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 304
View: 5702
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A robot can build a car. But a robot cannot buy a car ... The explosion in the development of computer- and robot-based manufacturing is seeing the rapid expansion of laborless production systems. Such systems create enormous instability, both for the overall world economy where money previously paid in wages is now invested in labor-saving technology and therefore cannot be spent on goods, and for workers whose jobs are being de-skilled or are simply disappearing. Bringing together contributions from workers employed in the new electronics and information industries with theorists in economics, politics and science, Cutting Edge provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of the complex relations between technology and work. Individual essays look at topics including the cyclical nature of a technologically driven economy, the privatization of knowledge which new information industries demand, the convergence of different economic sectors under the impact of digitalization, and the strategies which trade unionists and governments might deploy to protect jobs and living standards. Technology has the potential to end material scarcity and lay the foundations for higher forms of human fulfillment. But under existing power structures, it is more likely to exacerbate the poverty and misery under which most people live. Cutting Edge weighs that balance and, in helping us to understand how technology interacts with the production of goods and services, tips it in the direction of a more equal and creative world.

States and Social Revolutions

A Comparative Analysis of France, Russia, and China
Author: Theda Skocpol
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316453944
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 9103
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State structures, international forces, and class relations: Theda Skocpol shows how all three combine to explain the origins and accomplishments of social-revolutionary transformations. Social revolutions have been rare but undeniably of enormous importance in modern world history. States and Social Revolutions provides a new frame of reference for analyzing the causes, the conflicts, and the outcomes of such revolutions. It develops a rigorous, comparative historical analysis of three major cases: the French Revolution of 1787 through the early 1800s, the Russian Revolution of 1917 through the 1930s, and the Chinese Revolution of 1911 through the 1960s. Believing that existing theories of revolution, both Marxist and non-Marxist, are inadequate to explain the actual historical patterns of revolutions, Skocpol urges us to adopt fresh perspectives. Above all, she maintains that states conceived as administrative and coercive organizations potentially autonomous from class controls and interests must be made central to explanations of revolutions.

The Social Revolution


Author: Karl Kautsky
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Socialism
Page: 189
View: 5766
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Africa, national and social revolution

collection of papers read at the Cairo Seminar
Author: Otázky míru a socialismu
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 258
View: 6094
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Hitler's Social Revolution


Author: David Schoenbaum
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN: 0307822338
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 5740
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The author attempts to analyze Hitler's appeal to German farmers, workers, businessmen, industrialists, women and youth. Beginning with Germany's social situation after World War I, he demonstrates how Hitler improvised a programme that claimed to offer a classless society.

The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement


Author: John Franklin Jameson
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691005508
Category: History
Page: 105
View: 3363
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Written when political and military history dominated the discipline, J. Franklin Jameson's The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement was a pioneering work. Based on a series of four lectures he gave at Princeton University in 1925, the short book argued that the most salient feature of the American Revolution had not been the war for independence from Great Britain; it was, rather, the struggle between aristocratic values and those of the common people who tended toward a leveling democracy. American revolutionaries sought to change their government, not their society, but in destroying monarchy and establishing republics, they in fact changed their society profoundly. Jameson wrote, "The stream of revolution, once started, could not be con.ned within narrow banks, but spread abroad upon the land.' Jameson's book was among the first to bring social analysis to the fore of American history. Examining the effects the American Revolution had on business, intellectual and religious life, slavery, land ownership, and interactions between members of different social classes, Jameson showed the extent of the social reforms won at home during the war. By looking beyond the political and probing the social aspects of this seminal event, Jameson forced a reexamination of revolution as a social phenomenon and, as one reviewer put it, injected a "liberal spirit" into the study of American history. Still in print after nearly eighty years, the book is a classic of American historiography.

Fascism: The social dynamics of fascism


Author: Matthew Feldman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780415290173
Category: Political Science
Page: 372
View: 2546
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The nature of 'fascism' has been hotly contested by scholars since the term was first coined by Mussolini in 1919. However, for the first time since Italian fascism appeared there is now a significant degree of consensus amongst scholars about how to approach the generic term, namely as a revolutionary form of ultra-nationalism. Seen from this perspective, all forms of fascism have three common features: anticonservatism, a myth of ethnic or national renewal and a conception of a nation in crisis. This collection includes articles that show this new consensus, which is inevitably contested, as well as making available material which relates to aspects of fascism independently of any sort of consensus and also covering fascism of the inter and post-war periods.This is a comprehensive selection of texts, reflecting both the extreme multi-faceted nature of fascism as a phenomenon and the extraordinary divergence of interpretations of fascism.

Seminar, Africa: national and social revolution


Author: al-Ṭalīʻah,Otázky míru a socialismu
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Africa
Page: N.A
View: 3206
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Women and Social Revolution


Author: Padma Iyer
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Feminism
Page: 192
View: 9493
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This Book Covers A Wide Range Of Topics Covering The Field Of Feminism, Its History, The Problems Faced By Activists And How They Overcame Them. It Also Outlines The Stirrings Among Women That Led Them To Come Forward And Demand Equality And Parity In All Spheres Of Human Activity And Also A Place Side By Side With Their Male Counterparts And Not Behind Them. The Chapters Have Been Chosen With Care And Display The Utility Of The Book. They Include: Female Liberation In The International Context; Women S Liberation And The Political Economy; The Future Of Women S Revolution; Feminism S New Strategies; Doing Away With The Subordination Of Women; Psychological Cycles Of Women; The Economic Role Of Housekeeping; The Politics Of Housework; Women As Prisoners Of Feminism; Women Stereotypes; Waning Of Feminism; The Revival Of Feminism; Feminism Gains Ground; The New Generation Feminists; Birth Control: Pros And Cons; Feminism As A Class Movement; The Roots Of Social Awareness; Feminism And Pacifism; Coloured And Racist Feminism; And Feminism Is Grounded In Mental Attitudes, The Range Of Topics Speak For Themselves. The Book Will Be Most Useful For Teachers, Students And Researchers In Women S Studies And Also All Those Interested In The Sociological Aspects Of How They Struggled And Fought For A Place In The Sun .