Aeschylus: Persians ; Seven against Thebes ; Suppliants ; Prometheus bound


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 576
View: 9447
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Aeschylus (c. 525–456 BCE) is the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world's great art forms. Seven of his eighty or so plays survive complete, including the Oresteia trilogy and the Persians, the only extant Greek historical drama. Fragments of his lost plays also survive.

Aeschylus: Suppliant maidens. Persians. Prometheus. Seven against Thebes


Author: Aeschylus,Herbert Weir Smyth
Publisher: Harvard Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 425
View: 1758
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Aeschylus (ca. 525–456 BCE), author of the first tragedies existing in European literature, was an Athenian born at Eleusis. He served at Marathon against Darius in 490, and again during Xerxes' invasion, 480–479. Between 478 and 467 he visited Sicily, there composing by request Women of Aetna. At Athens he competed in production of plays more than twenty times, and was rewarded on at least thirteen occasions, becoming dominant between 500 and 458 through the splendour of his language and his dramatic conceptions and technique. Of his total of 80–90 plays seven survive complete. The Persians (472), the only surviving Greek historical drama, presents the failure of Xerxes to conquer Greece. Seven against Thebes (467) was the second play of its trilogy of related plays on the evil fate of the Theban House. Polyneices tries to regain Thebes from his brother Eteocles; both are killed. In Suppliant Maidens, the first in a trilogy, the daughters of Danaus arrive with him at Argos, whose King and people save them from the wooing of the sons of their uncle Aegyptus. In Prometheus Bound, first or second play of its trilogy about Prometheus, he is nailed to a crag, by order of Zeus, for stealing fire from heaven for men. Defiant after visitors' sympathy and despite advice, he descends in lightning and thunder to Hell. The Oresteia (458), on the House of Atreus, is the only Greek trilogy surviving complete. In Agamemnon, the King returns from Troy, and is murdered by his wife Clytaemnestra. In Libation-Bearers, Orestes with his sister avenges their father Agamemnon's death by counter-murder. In Eumenides, Orestes, harassed by avenging Furies, is arraigned by them at Athens for matricide. Tried by a court set up by Athena, he is absolved, but the Furies are pacified. We publish in Volume I four plays; and in Volume II the Oresteia and some fragments of lost plays.

Persians, Seven against Thebes, and Suppliants


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 142140253X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 168
View: 828
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Intended to be both read as literature and performed as plays, these translations are lucid and readable, while remaining staunchly faithful to the texts.

Aeschylus: Suppliants


Author: Thalia Papadopoulou
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1472521498
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 192
View: 6575
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Aeschylus' 'Suppliants' dramatises the myth of the fifty daughters of Danaos, who flee Egypt and come to Argos as suppliants, trying to escape forced marriage to their Egyptian cousins. It was long considered to be the earliest surviving tragedy. Even after the mid-20th century, when new evidence established a later date for the play, critics tended to condemn it for its alleged 'archaic' features. As a result it has long been underestimated, although a careful examination reveals it to be one of the most exciting tragedies. This companion employs a variety of critical approaches to set the play in its literary, dramatic, social and historical contexts, and also offers a thorough examination of the performance of the tragedy, investigating topics such as stage, action, music, song and dance.

Prometheus Bound: And the Seven Against Thebes


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1105999580
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 4661
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The punishment of Prometheus as a consequence of the theft is a major theme of his mythology, and is a popular subject of both ancient and modern art. Zeus, king of the Olympian gods, sentenced the Titan to eternal torment for his transgression. The immortal Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to feed on his liver, only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next day. In some stories, Prometheus is freed at last by the hero Heracles (Hercules).

Medicine and Humanism in Late Medieval Italy

The Carrara Herbal in Padua
Author: Sarah R. Kyle
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351997793
Category: History
Page: 258
View: 347
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"The Carrara Herbal is an exceptional illustrated book of materia medica (therapeutic substances drawn from plants, animals and minerals). It is exceptional in both its illustrations and its content, making it of interest to historians of art and medicine alike. The Herbal contains a translation into Paduan dialect of a Latin version of the mid-thirteenth-century Arabic pharmacopeia, Kitab al-Adwiya al-mufrada (The Book of Simple Medicines), written by Ibn Sarabi, a Christian physician working in al-Andalus and known in the Latin West as Serapion the Younger."--Introduction.

The Reception of Aeschylus’ Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers


Author: Stratos Constantinidis
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004332162
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 428
View: 9997
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In The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays 15 scholars explore new methods and frontiers for studying and staging Aeschylus’ plays by showing the tensions between traditional scholarship and innovative analysis in reception studies and performance studies.

Silvae


Author: Publius Papinius Statius
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674012097
Category: Epic poetry, Latin
Page: 441
View: 6870
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Statius published his Thebaid in the last decade of the first century. This epic recounting the struggle between the two sons of Oedipus for the kingship of Thebes is his masterpiece, a stirring exploration of the passions of civil war. The extant portion of his unfinished Achilleid is strikingly different in tone: this second epic begins as a charming account of Achilles' life. Statius was raised in the Greek cultural milieu of the Bay of Naples, and his Greek literary education is reflected in his poetry. The political realities of Rome in the first century are also evident in the Thebaid, in representations of authoritarian power and the drive for domination. This two-volume edition of the epics, a freshly edited Latin text facing a graceful translation, completes D. R. Shackleton Bailey's new Loeb Classical Library edition of Statius. Kathleen M. Coleman contributed an essay on recent scholarship on the two epics.

Aeschylus


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Mythology, Greek
Page: N.A
View: 6348
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Aeschylus: Seven Against Thebes


Author: Isabelle Torrance
Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
ISBN: 9780715634660
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 174
View: 5579
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Accessible introductions to ancient tragedies. Each volume discusses the main themes of a play and the central developments in modern criticism, while also addressing the play's historical context and the history of its performance and adaptation. One of our earliest surviving Greek tragedies, Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes is an extraordinarily rich poetic text. It dramatises the civil war between the sons of Oedipus ?Polynices, the exile, and Eteocles, reigning king of Thebes. Polynices marches on Thebes to regain his throne along with six other champion warriors and their armies, but the expedition is doomed, and the meaning of Oedipus' enigmatic curse on his sons ultimately becomes clear through their simultaneous fratricide and the extinction of the Theban house. This book places the drama within the context of the connected trilogy of which it was a part. It investigates the play's tensions between city and family and the omnipresence of curse and ritual within the religious and political environment of fifth century Greece. The drama's focus on the world of male warriors, and its stark opposition of the sexes through the female Chorus, is analysed in terms of warrior ideology in epic and Greek understanding of appropriate behaviour. Finally, it explores the complex legacy of the play through its influence on Sophocles and Euripides, and shows how the drama's condemnation of civil war has been exploited as an analogue for events in modern history.

Trachiniae


Author: Sophocles,Malcolm Davies
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 289
View: 7714
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Sophocles' Trachiniae has traditionally been his least popular play, but it is now generally agreed that its tragic vision of life is perfectly compatible with that of his other dramas. The introduction to this important new commentary deals with the play's merits, the question of its unity, its treatment of the hero Heracles, the story's pre-Sophoclean tradition, and the evidence of contemporary art. Much of the commentary itself is devoted to textual problems that arise from the frequently corrupt and uncertain text, as well as wider issues of interpretation.

The Biblical Tour of Hell


Author: Matthew Ryan Hauge
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 0567604969
Category: Religion
Page: 192
View: 7766
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It is difficult to underestimate the significance of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19-31 within the biblical tradition. Although hell occupies a prominent position in popular Christianrhetoric today, it plays a relatively minor role in the Christian canon. The most important biblical texts that explicitly describe the fate of the dead are in the Synoptic Gospels. Yet among these passages, only the Lukan tradition is intent on explicitly describing the abode of the dead; it is the only biblical tour of hell. Hauge examines the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19-31, uniquely the only 'parable' that is set within a supernatural context. The parables characteristically feature concrete realities of first-century Mediterranean life, but the majority of Luke 16:19-31 is narrated from the perspective of the tormented dead. This volume demonstrates that the distinctive features of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus are the result of a strategic imitation, creative transformation, and Christian transvaluation of the descent of Odysseus into the house of hades in Odyssey Book 11, the literary model par excellence of postmortem revelation in antiquity.

What is Ancient Philosophy?


Author: Pierre Hadot,Michael Chase
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674013735
Category: Philosophy
Page: 362
View: 8697
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Pierre Hadot shows how the various schools, trends, and ideas of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy all strove to transform the individual s mode of perceiving and being in the world. For the ancients, philosophical theory and the philosophical way of life were inseparably linked. Hadot asks us to consider whether and how this connection might be reestablished today."

The Experiences of Tiresias

The Feminine and the Greek Man
Author: Nicole Loraux
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400864062
Category: History
Page: 358
View: 8979
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Nicole Loraux has devoted much of her writing to charting the paths of the Greek "imaginary," revealing a collective masculine psyche fraught with ambivalence as it tries to grasp the differences between nature and culture, body and soul, woman and man. The Experiences of Tiresias, its title referring to the shepherd struck blind after glimpsing Athena's naked body, captures this ambivalence in exploring how the Greek male defines himself in relationship to the feminine. In these essays, Loraux disturbs the idea of virile men and feminine women, a distinction found in official discourse and aimed at protecting the ideals of male identity from any taint of the feminine. Turning to epic and to Socrates, however, she insists on a logic of an inclusiveness between the genders, which casts a shadow over their clear, officially defined borders. The emphasis falls on the body, often associated with feminine vulnerability and weakness, and often dissociated from the ideal of the brave, self-sacrificing male warrior. But heroes such as the Homeric Achilles, who fears yet fights bravely, and Socrates, who speaks of the soul through the language of the body, challenge these representations. The anatomy of pain, the heroics of childbirth, the sorrows of tears, the warrior's wounds, and the madness of the soul: all these experiences are shown to engage with both the masculine and the feminine in ways that do not denigrate the experiences for either gender. Originally published in 1995. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Aeschylus II

The Oresteia
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226311481
Category: Drama
Page: 208
View: 758
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Aeschylus II contains “The Oresteia,” translated by Richmond Lattimore, and fragments of “Proteus,” translated by Mark Griffith. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

Fragments


Author: Ευριπιδες
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 640
View: 3661
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Euripides (c. 485 406 BCE) has been prized in every age for his emotional and intellectual drama. Eighteen of his ninety or so plays survive complete, including "Medea," "Hippolytus," and "Bacchae," one of the great masterpieces of the tragic genre. Fragments of his lost plays also survive.

The Penguin Book of Classical Myths


Author: Jenny March
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141920599
Category: Fiction
Page: 624
View: 7324
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The figures and events of classical myths underpin our culture and the constellations named after them fill the night sky. Whether it’s the raging Minotaur trapped in the Cretan labyrinth or the twelve labours of Hercules, Aphrodite’s birth from the waves or Zeus visiting Danae as a shower of gold, the mythology of Greece and Rome is full of unforgettable stories. All the stories of the Greek tragedies – Oedipus, Medea, Antigone – are there; all the events of the Trojan wars and of Odysseus and Aeneas’ epic journeys; the founding of Athens and of Rome... These are the strangest tales of love, war, betrayal and heroism ever told and, while brilliantly retelling them, this book shows how they echo through the works of much later writers from Chaucer and Shakespeare to Camus and Ted Hughes. Full of attractive illustrations and laid out in eighteen clear chapters (the titles include ‘Dangerous Women’ and ‘Heroes’), Dr Jennifer March has written a fascinating guide to the myths of classical civilization that is as readable as a novel.

Aeschylean Tragedy


Author: Alan H. Sommerstein
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1849667950
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 400
View: 5688
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Aeschylus was the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world's great art-forms. In this completely revised and updated edition of his book Alan H. Sommerstein, analysing the seven extant plays of the Aeschylean corpus (one of them probably in fact the work of another author) and utilising the knowledge we have of the seventy or more whose scripts have not survived, explores Aeschylus' poetic, dramatic, theatrical and musical techniques, his social, political and religious ideas, and the significance of his drama for our own day. Special attention is paid to the "Oresteia" trilogy, and the other surviving plays are viewed against the background of the four-play productions of which they formed part. There are chapters on Aeschylus' theatre, on his satyr-dramas, and on his dramatisations of Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey", and a detailed chapter-by-chapter guide to further reading. No knowledge of Greek is assumed, and all texts are quoted in translation.

The Art of Euripides

Dramatic Technique and Social Context
Author: Donald J. Mastronarde
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139486888
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7902
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In this book Professor Mastronarde draws on the seventeen surviving tragedies of Euripides, as well as the fragmentary remains of his lost plays, to explore key topics in the interpretation of the plays. It investigates their relation to the Greek poetic tradition and to the social and political structures of their original setting, aiming both to be attentive to the great variety of the corpus and to identify commonalities across it. In examining such topics as genre, structural strategies, the chorus, the gods, rhetoric, and the portrayal of women and men, this study highlights the ways in which audience responses are manipulated through the use of plot structures and the multiplicity of viewpoints expressed. It argues that the dramas of Euripides, through their dramatic technique, pose a strong challenge to simple formulations of norms, to the reading of consistent human character, and to the quest for certainty and closure.

Suppliant Women


Author: Euripides,Rosanna Warren,Stephen Scully
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195045536
Category: Law
Page: 82
View: 3474
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Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, The Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. Under the editorship of Herbert Golder and the late William Arrowsmith, each volume includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the plays. Already tested in performance on the stage, this translation shows for the first time in English the striking interplay of voices in Euripides' Suppliant Women. Torn between the mothers' lament over the dead and proud civic eulogy, between calls for a just war and grief for the fallen, the play captures with unremitting force the competing poles of the human psyche. The translators, Rosanna Warren and Stephen Scully, accentuate the contrast between female lament and male reasoned discourse in this play where the silent dead hold, finally, center stage.