American Immigration and Citizenship

A Documentary History
Author: John R. Vile
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442270209
Category: History
Page: 436
View: 933
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One of the most contentious issues in America today is the status of immigration. American Immigration and Citizenship shows that this issue is far from new. In this book, John Vile provides context for contemporary debates on the topic through key historical documents presented alongside essays that interpret their importance for the reader.

American Immigration and Citizenship

A Documentary History
Author: John R. Vile
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781442270190
Category:
Page: 308
View: 8820
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One of the most contentious issues in America today is the status of immigration. American Immigration and Citizenship shows that this issue is far from new. In this book, John Vile provides context for contemporary debates on the topic through key historical documents presented alongside essays that interpret their importance for the reader. The author concludes that a highly-interconnected world presents no easy answers and offers no single immigration policy that will work for all time. The book includes a mix of laws, constitutional provisions, speeches, and judicial decisions from each period. Vile furthermore traces the interconnections between issues of citizenship and issues of immigration, indicating that public opinion and legislation has often contained contradictory strains. Although the primary focus has been on national laws and decisions, some of the readings clearly indicate the stakes that states, which are often affected disproportionately by such laws, have also had in this process.

U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Issues

A Documentary History
Author: Michael C. LeMay,Elliott Robert Barkan
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313301568
Category: Law
Page: 336
View: 8950
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A collection of one hundred primary documents--including court cases, opinion pieces, and other materials--traces the history of naturalization and immigration policy enacted by the United States government to control migration since its founding.

Becoming a Citizen

Incorporating Immigrants and Refugees in the United States and Canada
Author: Irene Bloemraad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520248984
Category: History
Page: 369
View: 4937
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"Becoming a Citizen is a terrific book. Important, innovative, well argued, theoretically significant, and empirically grounded. It will be the definitive work in the field for years to come."--Frank D. Bean, Co-Director, Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy "This book is in three ways innovative. First, it avoids the domestic navel-gazing of U.S .immigration studies, through an obvious yet ingenious comparison with Canada. Second, it shows that official multiculturalism and common citizenship may very well go together, revealing Canada, and not the United States, as leader in successful immigrant integration. Thirdly, the book provides a compelling picture of how the state matters in making immigrants citizens. An outstanding contribution to the migration and citizenship literature!"--Christian Joppke, American University of Paris

The Columbia Documentary History of the Asian American Experience


Author: Franklin Odo
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231110303
Category: History
Page: 590
View: 3267
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This collection of key documents presents the rich Asian American heritage through primary sources -- speeches, diary entries, editorials, advertisements, court opinions, legislation, songs, and poems -- along with expert, concise editorial commentary. It reflects not only the rapid expansion in the field of Asian American studies in the last decade but also innovative scholarship on Asian Americans from many fields, including western history, feminist studies, political science, anthropology, and military history.

Unbound Voices

A Documentary History of Chinese Women in San Francisco
Author: Judy Yung
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520218604
Category: History
Page: 543
View: 1313
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"A landmark contribution. . . . These rich materials—including proverbs, immigration interrogations, poems, articles, photographs, social workers' reports, recipes, and oral histories—add a new dimension to Asian American studies, U.S. women's history, Chinese American history, and immigration studies."—Valerie Matsumoto, University of California, Los Angeles

The Columbia Documentary History of Race and Ethnicity in America


Author: Ronald H. Bayor
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231119948
Category: History
Page: 991
View: 7141
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With more than 240 primary sources, this introduction to a complex topic is a resource for student research.

Governmental Responses to Natural Disasters in the U.S.

A Documentary History
Author: John R. Vile
Publisher: Talbot Publishing
ISBN: 9781616195809
Category: Reference
Page: 396
View: 3938
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Rarely does a month go by without news reports of a major natural catastrophe. Whether faced with recent hurricanes in Puerto Rico or Katrina, 9/11, wild fires, earthquakes or global warming, we judge leaders by their reaction to such disasters. Through the use of carefully-edited original sources, this book places these disasters in context.

Asian Americans and Congress

A Documentary History
Author: Hyung-chan Kim
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 596
View: 5212
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Covering all major laws since 1790, this volume shows the impact of congressional immigration laws on Asian Americans.

Paper Citizens

How Illegal Immigrants Acquire Citizenship in Developing Countries
Author: Kamal Sadiq
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199707805
Category: Political Science
Page: 296
View: 4916
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In this groundbreaking work, Kamal Sadiq reveals that most of the world's illegal immigrants are not migrating directly to the US, but to countries in the vast developing world, where they are able to obtain citizenship papers fairly easily. Sadiq introduces "documentary citizenship" to explain how paperwork--often falsely obtained--confers citizenship on illegal immigrants. Across the globe, there are literally tens of millions of such illegal immigrants who have assumed the guise of "citizens." Who, then, is really a citizen? And what does citizenship mean for most of the world's peoples? Rendered in vivid detail, Paper Citizens not only shows how illegal immigrants acquire false papers, but also sheds light on the consequences this will have for global security in the post 9/11 world.

The Two Faces of American Freedom


Author: Aziz Rana
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674058968
Category: History
Page: 427
View: 3981
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This is a sweeping new interpretation of the national experience, reconceiving key political events from the Revolution to the New Deal. Rana begins by emphasizing that the national founding was first and foremost an experiment in settler colonization. For American settlers, internal self-government involved a unique vision of freedom, which combined direct political participation with economic independence. However, this independence was based on ideas of extensive land ownership which helped to sustain both territorial conquest and the subordination of slaves and native peoples. At the close of the nineteenth century, emerging social movements struggled to liberate the potential of self-rule from these oppressive and exclusionary features. These efforts ultimately collapsed, in large part because white settlers failed to conceive of liberty as a truly universal aspiration. The consequence was the rise of new modes of political authority that presented national and economic security as society’s guiding commitments. Rana contends that the challenge for today’s reformers is to recover a robust notion of independence and participation from the settler experience while finally making it universal.

A Nation Of Immigrants


Author: President John F. Kennedy
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1786258560
Category: History
Page: 88
View: 1202
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President John F. Kennedy’s final book, A Nation of Immigrants, is a most worthy and relevant contribution to the contemporary debate on immigration reform. Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland. This modern edition of his posthumously published, timeless work—offers the late president’s inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America. As continued debates on immigration engulf the nation, this paean to the importance of immigrants to our nation’s prominence and success is as timely as ever.-Print Ed. “In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history....It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.”—ROBERT F. KENNEDY

Asian Americans and the Supreme Court

A Documentary History
Author: Hyung-chan Kim
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313272349
Category: History
Page: 1164
View: 969
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Covering the past 150 years, this documentary history critiques major Supreme Court decisions on litigations that Asian Americans brought before the Court. Separate sections written by contributing scholars focus on cases pertaining to the question of the government's right to exclude, expel, or deport persons of Asian ancestry, the constitutional question of U.S. citizenship for persons of Asian ancestry, the alien laws of California and Washington, and Japanese internment. A seventh section casts the problem of denying Asian Americans their constitutional rights within the framework of Asian American "foreignness" as viewed by white America. The final chapter reviews major immigration laws passed by Congress in the 20th century and discusses the implications of the Immigration Act of 1990. The volume concludes with a case, name, and subject index.

Transforming America

Perspectives on U.S. Immigration
Author: Michael C. LeMay
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313396434
Category: Social Science
Page: 807
View: 3058
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Utilizing multiple perspectives of related academic disciplines, this three-volume set of contributed essays enables readers to understand the complexity of immigration to the United States and grasp how our history of immigration has made this nation what it is today.

Latino Americans

The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation
Author: Ray Suarez
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101626976
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 6754
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THE COMPANION BOOK TO THE PBS DOCUMENTARY SERIES Latino Americans chronicles the rich and varied history of Latinos, who have helped shaped our nation and have become, with more than fifty million people, the largest minority in the United States. This companion to the landmark PBS miniseries vividly and candidly tells how the story of Latino Americans is the story of our country. Author and acclaimed journalist Ray Suarez explores the lives of Latino American men and women over a five-hundred-year span, encompassing an epic range of experiences from the early European settlements to Manifest Destiny; the Wild West to the Cold War; the Great Depression to globalization; and the Spanish-American War to the civil rights movement. Latino Americans shares the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and many others—individuals who have made an impact on history, as well as those whose extraordinary lives shed light on the times in which they lived, and the legacy of this incredible American people.

Immigration

A Documentary and Reference Guide
Author: Thomas Cieslik,David Felsen,Akis Kalaitzidis
Publisher: Greenwood
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 351
View: 9799
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Intense current controversies over foreign immigration to the United States are deeply rooted in America's history, as is revealed in this comprehensive and illuminating documentary guide.

The Making of Asian America

A History
Author: Erika Lee
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476739412
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 7315
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"The definitive history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, this book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States. Published to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the United States' Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that has remade our "nation of immigrants," this is a new and definitive history of Asian Americans. But more than that, it is a new way of understanding America itself, its complicated histories of race and immigration, and its place in the world today"--

The Making of a Dream

How a group of young undocumented immigrants helped change what it means to be American
Author: Laura Wides-Muñoz
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 006256014X
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 6356
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A journalist chronicles the next chapter in civil rights—the story of a movement and a nation, witnessed through the poignant and inspiring experiences of five young undocumented activists who are transforming society’s attitudes toward one of the most contentious political matters roiling America today: immigration. They are called the DREAMers: young people who were brought, or sent, to the United States as children and who have lived for years in America without legal status. Growing up, they often worked hard in school, planned for college, only to learn they were, in the eyes of the United States government and many citizens, "illegal aliens." Determined to take fate into their own hands, a group of these young undocumented immigrants risked their safety to "come out" about their status—sparking a transformative movement, engineering a seismic shift in public opinion on immigration, and inspiring other social movements across the country. Their quest for permanent legal protection under the so-called "Dream Act," stalled. But in 2012, the Obama administration issued a landmark, new immigration policy: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which has since protected more than half a million young immigrants from deportation even as efforts to install more expansive protections remain elusive. The Making of a Dream begins at the turn of the millennium, with the first of a series of "Dream Act" proposals; follows the efforts of policy makers, activists, and undocumented immigrants themselves, and concludes with the 2016 presidential election and the first months of the Trump presidency. The immigrants’ coming of age stories intersect with the watershed political and economic events of the last two decades: 9/11, the recession, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Obama presidency, and the rebirth of the anti-immigrant right. In telling their story, Laura Wides-Muñoz forces us to rethink our definition of what it means to be American.

Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America


Author: Vivek Bald
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674070402
Category: History
Page: 318
View: 5913
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Nineteenth-century Muslim peddlers arrived at Ellis Island, bags heavy with embroidered silks from their villages in Bengal. Demand for “Oriental goods” took these migrants on a curious path, from New Jersey’s boardwalks into the segregated South. Bald’s history reveals cross-racial affinities below the surface of early twentieth-century America.