British North America in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries


Author: Stephen Foster
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192513583
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 7116
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Until relatively recently, the connection between British imperial history and the history of early America was taken for granted. In recent times, however, early American historiography has begun to suffer from a loss of coherent definition as competing manifestos demand various reorderings of the subject in order to combine time periods and geographical areas in ways that would have previously seemed anomalous. It has also become common place to announce that the history of America is best accounted for in America itself in a three-way melee between "settlers", the indigenous populations, and the forcibly transported African slaves and their creole descendants. The contributions to British North America in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries acknowledge the value of the historiographic work done under this new dispensation in the last two decades and incorporate its insights. However, the volume advocates a pluralistic approach to the subject generally, and attempts to demonstrate that the metropolitan power was of more than secondary importance to America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The central theme of this volume is the question "to what extent did it make a difference to those living in the colonies that made up British North America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that they were part of an empire and that the empire in question was British?" The contributors, some of the leading scholars in their respective fields, strive to answer this question in various social, political, religious, and historical contexts.

The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume V: Historiography


Author: Robin Winks
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191542415
Category: History
Page: 756
View: 9662
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The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. From the founding of colonies in North America and the West Indies in the seventeenth century to the reversion of Hong Kong to China at the end of the twentieth, British imperialism was a catalyst for far-reaching change. The Oxford History of the British Empire as a comprehensive study helps us to understand the end of Empire in relation to its beginning, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as for the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. This fifth and final volume shows how opinions have changed dramatically over the generations about the nature, role, and value of imperialism generally, and the British Empire more specifically. The distinguished team of contributors discuss the many and diverse elements which have influenced writings on the Empire: the pressure of current events, access to primary sources, the creation of relevant university chairs, the rise of nationalism in former colonies, decolonization, and the Cold War. They demonstrate how the study of empire has evolved from a narrow focus on constitutional issues to a wide-ranging enquiry about international relations, the uses of power, and impacts and counterimpacts between settler groups and native peoples. The result is a thought-provoking cultural and intellectual inquiry into how we understand the past, and whether this understanding might affect the way we behave in the future.

Bristol and the Atlantic Trade in the Eighteenth Century


Author: Kenneth Morgan
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521893671
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 308
View: 9745
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Dr Morgan compares the performance of Bristol as a port with the growth of other out ports.

Crisis of Empire

Britain and America in the Eighteenth Century
Author: Jeremy Black
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1847252435
Category: History
Page: 216
View: 8656
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A new account of the changing relationship between Britain and America in the 18th Century that helped to define both nations.

British Atlantic, American Frontier

Spaces of Power in Early Modern British America
Author: Stephen Hornsby,Michael Hermann (cartographer.)
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 9781584654278
Category: History
Page: 307
View: 3769
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A pioneering work in Atlantic studies that emphasizes a transnational approach to the past.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199324034
Category: History
Page: 696
View: 8003
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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution draws on a wealth of new scholarship to create a vibrant dialogue among varied approaches to the revolution that made the United States. In thirty-three essays written by authorities on the period, the Handbook brings to life the diverse multitudes of colonial North America and their extraordinary struggles before, during, and after the eight-year-long civil war that secured the independence of thirteen rebel colonies from their erstwhile colonial parent. The chapters explore battles and diplomacy, economics and finance, law and culture, politics and society, gender, race, and religion. Its diverse cast of characters includes ordinary farmers and artisans, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. In addition to expanding the Revolution's who, the Handbook broadens its where, portraying an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. It offers readers an American Revolution whose impact ranged far beyond the thirteen colonies. The Handbook's range of interpretive and methodological approaches captures the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Its authors, British and American scholars spanning several generations, include social, cultural, military, and imperial historians, as well as those who study politics, diplomacy, literature, gender, and sexuality. Together and separately, these essays demonstrate that the American Revolution remains a vibrant and inviting a subject of inquiry. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.

Painting in Canada

A History
Author: J. Russell Harper
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802063076
Category: Art
Page: 463
View: 388
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Through a lively combination of entertaining anecdotes, descriptions of the cultural background, biographical accounts, and critical judgement, the reader comes to know intimately the artists, their paintings, and their environments.

Virginia Law Books

Essays and Bibliographies
Author: William Hamilton Bryson
Publisher: American Philosophical Society
ISBN: 9780871692399
Category: Law
Page: 622
View: 3956
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Contents: State codes; Municipal & County Codes; Rules of Court; Reports of Cases; Official Court Records in Print; Accounts of Trials; Indexes, Digests, & Encyclopedias; Form Books; Law Treatises Printed Before 1950; Criminal Law Books; 19th-Century Law Journals; 20th-Century Legal Periodicals; Legal Education; Academic Law Libraries; William & Mary Law Library; Public Law Librarians; The Norfolk Law Library; Private Law Libraries Before 1776; Private Law Libraries After 1776; Public Printers; J.W. Randolph; The Michie Company; General Virginia Bibliography; Index of Authors & Editors; & Subject Index.

The Atlantic Economy During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Organization, Operation, Practice, and Personnel
Author: CONFERENCE THE EMERGENCE OF THE ATLANTI
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781570035548
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 377
View: 3821
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The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries is a collection of essays focusing on the expansion, elaboration, and increasing integration of the economy of the Atlantic basin - comprising parts of Europe, West Africa, and the Americas - during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In thirteen essays, the contributors examine the complex and variegated processes by which markets were created in the Atlantic basin and how they became integrated. While a number of the contributors focus on the economic history of a specific European imperial system, others, mirroring the realities of the world they are writing about, transcend imperial boundaries and investigate topics shared throughout the region. In the latter case, the contributors focus either on processes occurring along the margins or interstices of empires, or on breaches in the colonial systems established by various European powers. Taken together, the essays shed much-needed light on the organization and operation of both the European imperial orders of the early modern era and the increasingly integrated economy of the Atlantic basin challenging these orders over the course of the same period.

An Empire of Regions

A Brief History of Colonial British America
Author: Eric Nellis
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442604034
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 8891
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An Empire of Regions is a refreshing interpretation of British American history that demonstrates how the thirteen British mainland colonies grew to function as self-governing entities in distinct regional clusters. In lucid prose, Eric Nellis invites readers to explore the circumstances leading to the colonies' collective defense of their individual interests, and to reevaluate the founding principles of the United States. There is considerable discussion of social conditions and of the British background to the colonies' development. Extensive treatment of slavery, the slave trade, and native populations is provided, while detailed maps illustrate colony boundaries, settlement growth, and the impact of the Proclamation Line. This absorbing and compelling narrative will captivate both newcomers to and enthusiasts of American history.

Parasites, Pathogens, and Progress


Author: N.A
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262297493
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 601
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Essays on Northeastern North America, 17th & 18th Centuries


Author: John G. Reid
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442691263
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 8501
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In examining the history of northeastern North America in the seventeenth and eighteen centuries, it is important to take into account diverse influences and experiences. Not only was the relationship between native inhabitants and colonial settlers a defining characteristic of Acadia/Nova Scotia and New England in this era, but it was also a relationship shaped by wider continental and oceanic connections. The essays in this volume deal with topics such as colonial habitation, imperial exchange, and aboriginal engagement, all of which were pervasive phenomena of the time. John G. Reid argues that these were complicated processes that interacted freely with one another, shaping the human experience at different times and places. Northeastern North America was an arena of distinctive complexities in the early modern period, and this collection uses it as an example of a manageable and logical basis for historical study. Reid also explores the significance of anniversary observances and commemorations that have served as vehicles of reflection on the lasting implications of historical developments in the early modern period. These and other insights amount to a fresh perspective on the region and offer a deeper understanding of North American history.

The World of the Revolutionary American Republic

Land, Labor, and the Conflict for a Continent
Author: Andrew Shankman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317814975
Category: History
Page: 460
View: 5265
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In its early years, the American Republic was far from stable. Conflict and violence, including major land wars, were defining features of the period from the Revolution to the outbreak of the Civil War, as struggles over who would control land and labor were waged across the North American continent. The World of the Revolutionary American Republic brings together original essays from an array of scholars to illuminate the issues that made this era so contested. Drawing on the latest research, the essays examine the conflicts that occurred both within the Republic and between the different peoples inhabiting the continent. Covering issues including slavery, westward expansion, the impact of Revolutionary ideals, and the economy, this collection provides a diverse range of insights into the turbulent era in which the United States emerged as a nation. With contributions from leading scholars in the field, both American and international, The World of the Revolutionary American Republic is an important resource for any scholar of early America.

Events that Changed America in the Eighteenth Century


Author: John E. Findling,Frank W. Thackeray
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313290824
Category: History
Page: 209
View: 4340
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Covers such events as the Great Awakening, the Stamp Act, and the French Indian War

Banishment in the Early Atlantic World

Convicts, Rebels and Slaves
Author: Peter Rushton,Gwenda Morgan
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441155015
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6287
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Banishing troublesome and deviant people from society was common in the early modern period. Many European countries removed their paupers, convicted criminals, rebels and religious dissidents to remote communities or to their colonies where they could be simultaneously punished and, perhaps, contained and reformed. Under British rule, poor Irish, Scottish Jacobites, English criminals, Quakers, gypsies, Native Americans, the Acadian French in Canada, rebellious African slaves, or vulnerable minorities like the Jews of St. Eustatius, were among those expelled and banished to another place. This book explores the legal and political development of this forced migration, focusing on the British Atlantic world between 1600 and 1800. The territories under British rule were not uniform in their policies, and not all practices were driven by instructions from London, or based on a clear legal framework. Using case studies of legal and political strategies from the Atlantic world, and drawing on accounts of collective experiences and individual narratives, the authors explore why victims were chosen for banishment, how they were transported and the impact on their lives. The different contexts of such banishment – internal colonialism ethnic and religious prejudice, suppression of religious or political dissent, or the savageries of war in Europe or the colonies – are examined to establish to what extent displacement, exile and removal were fundamental to the early British Empire.

Oriental Bodies

Discourse and Discipline in U.S. Immigration Policy, 1875-1942
Author: James A. Tyner
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739112977
Category: Political Science
Page: 117
View: 2022
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Oriental Bodies charts the discursive transformations of U.S. immigration policy between 1875 and 1942. Author James Tyner concentrates on the confluence of eugenics, geopolitics, and Orientalism as these intersect in the debates surrounding the exclusion of immigrants from China, Japan, and the Philippines. This unique work argues that United States immigration policy was founded on a particular discourse of eugenics and geopolitics and that this concentration was informed by a greater Orientalist discourse. Drawing from American foreign policy, identity politics, post-structuralism, post-colonialism, and feminist theory, this fascinating study seeks to examine the construction of 'Oriental bodies' within the emergence of U.S. immigration policy and explores how these constructions served political, social, and economic interests.

Regional Identity and Behavior


Author: Max Sugar
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461506913
Category: Psychology
Page: 194
View: 2387
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The author proposes that the four earliest British North American colonies in the United States promoted the development of distinct regional identities and that this cultural legacy affected identity development as well as behavioral patterns differently in each region. He compares data from the North American colonies to the situation in England and discovers that the findings in the latter's eight standard regions are very similar to those in the United States.

Britain and Colonial Maritime War in the Early Eighteenth Century

Silver, Seapower and the Atlantic
Author: Shinsuke Satsuma
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd
ISBN: 1843838621
Category: History
Page: 284
View: 377
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In early modern Britain, there was an argument that war at sea, especially war in Spanish America, was an ideal means of warfare, offering the prospect of rich gains at relatively little cost whilst inflicting considerable damage on enemy financial resources. This book examines that argument, tracing its origin to the glorious memory of Elizabethan maritime war, discussing its supposed economic advantages, and investigating its influence on British politics and naval policy during the War of the Spanish Succession (1702-13) and after. The book reveals that the alleged economic advantages of war at sea were crucial in attracting the support of politicians of different political stances. It shows how supporters of war at sea, both in the government as well as in the opposition, tried to implement pro-maritime war policy by naval operations, colonial expeditions and by legislation, and how their attempts were often frustrated by diplomatic considerations, the incapacity of naval administration, and by conflicting interests between different groups connected to the West Indian colonies and Spanish American trade. It demonstrates how, after the War of the Spanish Succession, arguments for active colonial maritime war continued to be central to political conflict, notably in the opposition propaganda campaigns against the Walpole ministry, culminating in the War of Jenkins's Ear against Spain in 1739. The book also includes material on the South Sea Company, showing how the foundation of this company, later the subject of the notorious 'Bubble', was a logical part of British strategy. Shinsuke Satsuma completed his doctorate in maritime history at the University of Exeter.

Diversity and Unity in Early North America


Author: Phillip Morgan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134881622
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 2892
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Philip Morgan's selection of cutting-edge essays by leading historians represents the extraordinary vitality of recent historical literature on early America. The book opens up previously unexplored areas such as cultural diversity, ethnicity, and gender, and reveals the importance of new methods such as anthropology, and historical demography to the study of early America.

Papist Patriots

The Making of an American Catholic Identity
Author: Maura Jane Farrelly
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199912149
Category: Religion
Page: 324
View: 5564
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"The persons in America who were the most opposed to Great Britain had also, in general, distinguished themselves by being particularly hostile to Catholics." So wrote the minister, teacher, and sometime-historian Jonathan Boucher from his home in Surrey, England, in 1797. He blamed "old prejudices against papists" for the Revolution's popularity - especially in Maryland, where most of the non-Canadian Catholics in British North America lived. Many historians since Boucher have noted the role that anti-Catholicism played in stirring up animosity against the king and Parliament. Yet, in spite of the rhetoric, Maryland's Catholics supported the independence movement more enthusiastically than their Protestant neighbors. Not only did Maryland's Catholics embrace the idea of independence, they also embraced the individualistic, rights-oriented ideology that defined the Revolution, even though theirs was a communally oriented denomination that stressed the importance of hierarchy, order, and obligation. Catholic leaders in Europe made it clear that the war was a "sedition" worthy of damnation, even as they acknowledged that England had been no friend to the Catholic Church. So why, then, did "papists" become "patriots?" Maura Jane Farrelly finds that the answer has a long history, one that begins in England in the early seventeenth century and gains momentum during the nine decades preceding the American Revolution, when Maryland's Catholics lost a religious toleration that had been uniquely theirs in the English-speaking world and were forced to maintain their faith in an environment that was legally hostile and clerically poor. This experience made Maryland's Catholics the colonists who were most prepared in 1776 to accept the cultural, ideological, and psychological implications of a break from England.