City of Courts

Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago
Author: Michael Willrich
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521794039
Category: History
Page: 332
View: 7613
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This 2003 book looks at contesting concepts of crime, and social justice in nineteenth-century industrial America.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Nineteenth-Century Spiritualism and the Occult


Author: Tatiana Kontou
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317042271
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 454
View: 4213
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Critical attention to the Victorian supernatural has flourished over the last twenty-five years. Whether it is spiritualism or Theosophy, mesmerism or the occult, the dozens of book-length studies and hundreds of articles that have appeared recently reflect the avid scholarly discussion of Victorian mystical practices. Designed both for those new to the field and for experts, this volume is organized into sections covering the relationship between Victorian spiritualism and science, the occult and politics, and the culture of mystical practices. The Ashgate Research Companion to Nineteenth-Century Spiritualism and the Occult brings together some of the most prominent scholars working in the field to introduce current approaches to the study of nineteenth-century mysticism and to define new areas for research.

Catching a Case

Inequality and Fear in New York City's Child Welfare System
Author: Tina Lee
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576164
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 258
View: 3658
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Influenced by news reports of young children brutalized by their parents, most of us see the role of child services as the prevention of severe physical abuse. But as Tina Lee shows in Catching a Case, most child welfare cases revolve around often ill-founded charges of neglect, and the parents swept into the system are generally struggling but loving, fighting to raise their children in the face of crushing poverty, violent crime, poor housing, lack of childcare, and failing schools. Lee explored the child welfare system in New York City, observing family courts, interviewing parents and following them through the system, asking caseworkers for descriptions of their work and their decision-making processes, and discussing cases with attorneys on all sides. What she discovered about the system is troubling. Lee reveals that, in the face of draconian budget cuts and a political climate that blames the poor for their own poverty, child welfare practices have become punitive, focused on removing children from their families and on parental compliance with rules. Rather than provide needed help for families, case workers often hold parents to standards almost impossible for working-class and poor parents to meet. For instance, parents can be accused of neglect for providing inadequate childcare or housing even when they cannot afford anything better. In many cases, child welfare exacerbates family problems and sometimes drives parents further into poverty while the family court system does little to protect their rights. Catching a Case is a much-needed wake-up call to improve the child welfare system, and to offer more comprehensive social services that will allow all children to thrive.

American Judicial Power

The State Court Perspective
Author: Michael Buenger,Paul J. De Muniz
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1783477903
Category: LAW
Page: 336
View: 4506
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American Judicial Power: The State Court Perspective is a welcome addition to the breadth of studies on the American legal system and provides an accessible and highly illuminating overview of the state courts and their functions. The study of America’s courts is overwhelmingly skewed toward the federal government, and therefore often overlooks state courts and their importance. Michael Buenger and Paul De Muniz fill this gap in the study of American constitutionalism, as they examine the wide and distinctive powers these courts exercise, and their role in administering the bulk of the nation’s justice system. This groundbreaking work covers many critical topics pertaining to the state courts, including: a comparison of the role of state and federal courts, the history of America’s state courts, the judicial selection processes utilized in the states, the unique roles assigned to state courts and the varying structure of those courts, the relationship between state judicial power and state legislative power, and the opportunities and challenges that are and will be facing the state courts. With an insightful foreword from Sanford Levinson, this revolutionary book will be of interest to students, educators, and researchers in the fields of law, political science, and government. Constitutional law experts will also benefit from an analysis of the state courts and their powers.

America, History and Life


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Canada
Page: N.A
View: 1382
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

The Book Review Digest

Annual cumulation
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Bibliography
Page: N.A
View: 7250
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Her Real Sphere?

Married Women's Labor Force Participation in the United States, 1860-1940
Author: Evan Warwick Roberts
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 918
View: 9392
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Journal of American studies


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 602
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Conquest by Law

How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands
Author: Lindsay G. Robertson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199881995
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 2174
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In 1823, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a Supreme Court decision of monumental importance in defining the rights of indigenous peoples throughout the English-speaking world. At the heart of the decision for Johnson v. M'Intosh was a "discovery doctrine" that gave rights of ownership to the European sovereigns who "discovered" the land and converted the indigenous owners into tenants. Though its meaning and intention has been fiercely disputed, more than 175 years later, this doctrine remains the law of the land. In 1991, while investigating the discovery doctrine's historical origins Lindsay Robertson made a startling find; in the basement of a Pennsylvania furniture-maker, he discovered a trunk with the complete corporate records of the Illinois and Wabash Land Companies, the plaintiffs in Johnson v. M'Intosh. Conquest by Law provides, for the first time, the complete and troubling account of the European "discovery" of the Americas. This is a gripping tale of political collusion, detailing how a spurious claim gave rise to a doctrine--intended to be of limited application--which itself gave rise to a massive displacement of persons and the creation of a law that governs indigenous people and their lands to this day.

Law and the Modern Mind

Consciousness and Responsibility in American Legal Culture
Author: Susanna L. Blumenthal
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674495535
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 2134
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Headline-grabbing murders are not the only cases in which sanity has been disputed in the American courtroom. Susanna Blumenthal traces this litigation, revealing how ideas of human consciousness, agency, and responsibility have shaped American jurisprudence as judges struggled to reconcile Enlightenment rationality with new sciences of the mind.

Law and Order

Street Crime, Civil Unrest, and the Crisis of Liberalism in the 1960s
Author: Michael W. Flamm
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023111513X
Category: History
Page: 294
View: 9466
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In the mid-1960s, amid a pervasive sense that American society was coming apart at the seams, a new issue known as 'law and order' emerged at the forefront of national politics. First introduced by Barry Goldwater in his ill-fated run for president in 1964, it eventually punished Lyndon Johnson and the Democrats and propelled Richard Nixon and the Republicans to the White House in 1968. In this thought-provoking study, Michael W. Flamm examines how conservatives successfully blamed liberals for the rapid rise in street crime and then skillfully used law and order to link the understandable fears of white voters to growing unease about changing moral values, the civil rights movement, urban disorder, and antiwar protests. Liberals, Flamm argues, were by contrast unable to craft a compelling message for anxious voters. Instead, they either ignored the crime crisis, claimed that law and order was a racist ruse, or maintained that social programs would solve the "root causes" of civil unrest. By 1968, this seemed increasingly unlikely and contributed to a loss of faith in the ability of the government to do what it was above all sworn to do-protect personal security and private property.

Representing the Race


Author: Kenneth W. Mack
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674065301
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 8962
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Profiles African American lawyers during the era of segregation and the civil rights movement, with an emphasis on the conflicts they felt between their identities as African Americans and their professional identities as lawyers.

The People and Their Peace

Legal Culture and the Transformation of Inequality in the Post-revolutionary South
Author: Laura F. Edwards
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807832634
Category: History
Page: 430
View: 3496
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This study discusses changes in the legal logic of slavery, race, and gender. Drawing on extensive archival research in North and South Carolina, Laura F. Edwards illuminates those changes by revealing the importance of localized legal practice.

The Cambridge History of Law in America


Author: Michael Grossberg,Christopher Tomlins
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521803055
Category: History
Page: 739
View: 4720
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This volume covers American law from the earliest settlement and colonization of North America.

The Crisis of Imprisonment

Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776–1941
Author: Rebecca M. McLennan
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139467484
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8434
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America's prison-based system of punishment has not always enjoyed the widespread political and moral legitimacy it has today. In this groundbreaking reinterpretation of penal history, Rebecca McLennan covers the periods of deep instability, popular protest, and political crisis that characterized early American prisons. She details the debates surrounding prison reform, including the limits of state power, the influence of market forces, the role of unfree labor, and the 'just deserts' of wrongdoers. McLennan also explores the system that existed between the War of 1812 and the Civil War, where private companies relied on prisoners for labor. Finally, she discusses the rehabilitation model that has primarily characterized the penal system in the twentieth century. Unearthing fresh evidence from prison and state archives, McLennan shows how, in each of three distinct periods of crisis, widespread dissent culminated in the dismantling of old systems of imprisonment.

The Opening of American Law

Neoclassical Legal Thought, 1870-1970
Author: Herbert Hovenkamp
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199331308
Category: Law
Page: 460
View: 8385
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Two late Victorian ideas disrupted American legal thought: the Darwinian theory of evolution and marginalist economics. The legal thought that emerged can be called 'neoclassical', because it embodied ideas that were radically new while retaining many elements of what had gone before. Although Darwinian social science was developed earlier, in most legal disciplines outside of criminal law and race theory marginalist approaches came to dominate. This book carries these themes through a variety of legal subjects in both public and private law.

States of Dependency

Welfare, Rights, and American Governance, 1935–1972
Author: Karen M. Tani
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107076846
Category: History
Page: 428
View: 8560
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This book recounts the transformation of American poor relief in the decades spanning the New Deal and the War on Poverty.

The British National Bibliography


Author: Arthur James Wells
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: English literature
Page: N.A
View: 1074
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The Sympathetic State

Disaster Relief and the Origins of the American Welfare State
Author: Michele Landis Dauber
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226923487
Category: History
Page: 353
View: 664
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Drawing on a variety of materials, including newspapers, legal briefs, political speeches, the art and literature of the time, and letters from thousands of ordinary Americans, Dauber shows that while this long history of government disaster relief has faded from our memory today, it was extremely well known to advocates for an expanded role for the national government in the 1930s, including the Social Security Act. Making this connection required framing the Great Depression as a disaster afflicting citizens though no fault of their own. Dauber argues that the disaster paradigm, though successful in defending the New Deal, would ultimately come back to haunt advocates for social welfare. By not making a more radical case for relief, proponents of the New Deal helped create the weak, uniquely American welfare state we have today - one torn between the desire to come to the aid of those suffering and the deeply rooted suspicion that those in need are responsible for their own deprivation.

Common Law, History, and Democracy in America, 1790–1900

Legal Thought before Modernism
Author: Kunal M. Parker
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139496360
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4142
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This book argues for a change in our understanding of the relationships among law, politics and history. Since the turn of the nineteenth century, a certain anti-foundational conception of history has served to undermine law's foundations, such that we tend to think of law as nothing other than a species of politics. Thus viewed, the activity of unelected, common law judges appears to be an encroachment on the space of democracy. However, Kunal M. Parker shows that the world of the nineteenth century looked rather different. Democracy was itself constrained by a sense that history possessed a logic, meaning and direction that democracy could not contravene. In such a world, far from law being seen in opposition to democracy, it was possible to argue that law - specifically, the common law - did a better job than democracy of guiding America along history's path.