Deep Diversity

Overcoming Us vs. Them
Author: Shakil Choudhury
Publisher: Between the Lines
ISBN: 1771130261
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 7408

What if our interactions with those different from us are strongly influenced by things happening below the radar of awareness, hidden even from ourselves? Deep Diversity explores this question and argues that “us vs. them” is an unfortunate but normal part of the human experience due to reasons of both nature and nurture. To really work through issues of racial difference and foster greater levels of fairness and inclusion, argues Shakil Choudhury, requires an understanding of the human mind—its conscious and unconscious dimensions. Deep Diversity integrates Choudhury’s twenty years of experience with interviews with researchers in social neuroscience, implicit bias, psychology, and mindfulness. Using a compassionate but challenging approach, Choudhury helps readers identify their own bias and offers practical ways to break the “prejudice habits” we have all learned, in order to tackle systemic discrimination. “Shakil Choudhury presents a uniquely accessible combination of personal observations and scientific evidence to make a convincing case for Deep Diversity. His words are honest and disarming and the book’s framework is both original and needed. This book will make you think hard and think better about what’s good for you, your organization, and society at large.” – Mahzarin R. Banaji, Harvard University, co-author of Blindspot: Hidden Biases in Good People

White Bound

Nationalists, Antiracists, and the Shared Meanings of Race
Author: Matthew Hughey
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804783314
Category: Social Science
Page: 296
View: 4282

Discussions of race are inevitably fraught with tension, both in opinion and positioning. Too frequently, debates are framed as clear points of opposition—us versus them. And when considering white racial identity, a split between progressive movements and a neoconservative backlash is all too frequently assumed. Taken at face value, it would seem that whites are splintering into antagonistic groups, with differing worldviews, values, and ideological stances. White Bound investigates these dividing lines, questioning the very notion of a fracturing whiteness, and in so doing offers a unique view of white racial identity. Matthew Hughey spent over a year attending the meetings, reading the literature, and interviewing members of two white organizations—a white nationalist group and a white antiracist group. Though he found immediate political differences, he observed surprising similarities. Both groups make meaning of whiteness through a reliance on similar racist and reactionary stories and worldviews. On the whole, this book puts abstract beliefs and theoretical projection about the supposed fracturing of whiteness into relief against the realities of two groups never before directly compared with this much breadth and depth. By examining the similarities and differences between seemingly antithetical white groups, we see not just the many ways of being white, but how these actors make meaning of whiteness in ways that collectively reproduce both white identity and, ultimately, white supremacy.

Social Statistics for a Diverse Society


Author: Chava Frankfort-Nachmias,Anna Leon-Guerrero
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1506347223
Category: Social Science
Page: 544
View: 3751

This Eighth Edition of Social Statistics for a Diverse Society continues to emphasize intuition and common sense, while demonstrating that social science is a constant interplay between methods of inquiry and important social issues. Recognizing that today’s students live in a world of growing diversity and richness of social differences, authors Chava Frankfort-Nachmias and Anna Leon-Guerrero use research examples that show how statistics is a tool for understanding the ways in which race, class, gender, and other categories of experience shape our social world and influence social behavior. In addition, guides for reading and interpreting the research literature help students acquire statistical literacy, while SPSS demonstrations and a rich variety of exercises help them hone their problem-solving skills.

Fear of a Black Nation

Race, Sex, and Security in Sixties Montreal
Author: David Austin
Publisher: Between the Lines
ISBN: 1771130113
Category: History
Page: 286
View: 9836

In the 1960s, for at least a brief moment, Montreal became what seemed an unlikely centre of Black Power and the Caribbean left. In October 1968 the Congress of Black Writers at McGill University brought together well-known Black thinkers and activists from Canada, the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean, people like C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Miriam Makeba, Rocky Jones, and Walter Rodney. Within months of the Congress, a Black-led protest at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) exploded on the front pages of newspapers across the country, raising state security fears about Montreal as the new hotbed of international Black radical politics.

Is Everyone Really Equal?

An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education
Author: Ozlem Sensoy,Robin DiAngelo
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807776173
Category: Education
Page: 259
View: 5153

This is the new edition of the award-winning guide to social justice education. Based on the authors’ extensive experience in a range of settings in the United States and Canada, the book addresses the most common stumbling blocks to understanding social justice. This comprehensive resource includes new features such as a chapter on intersectionality and classism; discussion of contemporary activism (Black Lives Matter, Occupy, and Idle No More); material on White Settler societies and colonialism; pedagogical supports related to “common social patterns” and “vocabulary to practice using”; and extensive updates throughout. Accessible to students from high school through graduate school, Is Everyone Really Equal? is a detailed and engaging textbook and professional development resource presenting the key concepts in social justice education. The text includes many user-friendly features, examples, and vignettes to not just define but illustrate the concepts. “Sensoy and DiAngelo masterfully unpack complex concepts in a highly readable and engaging fashion for readers ranging from preservice through experienced classroom teachers. The authors treat readers as intelligent thinkers who are capable of deep reflection and ethical action. I love their comprehensive development of a critical social justice framework, and their blend of conversation, clarity, and research. I heartily recommend this book!” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University Monterey Bay

Dancing on Live Embers

Challenging Racism in Organizations
Author: Tina Lopes,Barb Thomas
Publisher: Between The Lines
ISBN: 1897071043
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 284
View: 2799

VISUALLY DYNAMIC, Dancing on Live Embers investigates how racism, White power, and privilege operate in the ordinary moments of organizational life. It holds up familiar workplace interactions for scrutiny, and looks for openings to advance racial equity and justice. Through stories, it offers concrete examples of racial justice work by a range of experienced activists.This is a hands-on book for people who are trying to create more equitable organizations-front-line staff, managers, administrators, political leaders, union and community educators and activists, boards of directors, teachers, human resource staff, equity officers, and university and college faculty.

Planning theory for practitioners


Author: Michael P. Brooks,American Planning Association
Publisher: Amer Planning Assn
ISBN: 9781884829598
Category: Political Science
Page: 217
View: 8886

This book is recommended reading for planners preparing to take the AICP exam. In this new book, Michael Brooks bridges the gap between theory and practice. He describes an original approach-Feedback Strategy-that builds on the strengths of previous planning theories with one big difference: it not only acknowledges but welcomes politics-the bogeyman of real-world planning. Don't hold your nose or look the other way, Brooks advises planners, but use politics to your own advantage. Brooks admits that most of the time planning theory doesn't have much to do with planning practice. These ideas rooted in the planner's real world are different. This strategy employs everyday poltiical processes to advance planning, trusts planners' personal values and professional ethics, and depends on their ability to help clients articulate a vision. ?Planning Theory for Practitioners ? will encourage not only veteran planners searching for a fresh approach, but also students and recent graduates dismayed by the gap between academic theory and actual practice.

Reinventing Diversity

Transforming Organizational Community to Strengthen People, Purpose, and Performance
Author: Howard J. Ross
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442210451
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 9432

In Reinventing Diversity, one of America's leading diversity experts explains why most diversity programs fail and how we can make them work. In this inspiring guide, Howard Ross uses interviews, personal stories, statistics, and case studies to show that there is no quick fix, no easy answer. Acceptance needs to become part of the culture of a company, not just a mandated attitude.

Blindspot

Hidden Biases of Good People
Author: Mahzarin R. Banaji,Anthony G. Greenwald
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0345528433
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 254
View: 9446

A pair of leading psychologists argues that prejudice toward others is often an unconscious part of the human psyche, providing an analysis of the science behind biased feelings while sharing guidelines for identifying and learning from hidden prejudices. 15,000 first printing.

Disunity in Christ

Uncovering the Hidden Forces that Keep Us Apart
Author: Christena Cleveland
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830864954
Category: Religion
Page: 220
View: 3964

Winner of a 2013 Leadership Journal Book Award ("Our Very Short List" in "The Leader's Outer Life" category) 2014 Readers' Choice Awards Honorable Mention Despite Jesus' prayer that all Christians "be one," divisions have been epidemic in the body of Christ from the beginning to the present. We cluster in theological groups, gender groups, age groups, ethnic groups, educational and economic groups. We criticize freely those who disagree with us, don't look like us, don't act like us and don't even like what we like. Though we may think we know why this happens, Christena Cleveland says we probably don't. In this eye-opening book, learn the hidden reasons behind conflict and divisions. Learn: Why I think all my friends are unique but those in other groups are all the same Why little differences often become big sources of conflict Why categorizing others is often automatic and helpful but can also have sinister side effects Why we are so often victims of groupthink and how we can avoid it Why women think men are judging them more negatively than men actually are, and vice versa Why choices of language can actually affect unity With a personal touch and the trained eye of a social psychologist, Cleveland brings to bear the latest studies and research on the unseen dynamics at work that tend to separate us from others. Learn why Christians who have a heart for unity have such a hard time actually uniting. The author provides real insight for ministry leaders who have attempted to build bridges across boundaries. Here are the tools we need to understand how we can overcome the hidden forces that divide us.

The City Reader


Author: Richard T. LeGates,Frederic Stout
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317606272
Category: Architecture
Page: 776
View: 1211

The sixth edition of the highly successful The City Reader juxtaposes the very best classic and contemporary writings on the city to provide the comprehensive mapping of the terrain of Urban Studies and Planning old and new. The City Reader is the anchor volume in the Routledge Urban Reader Series and is now integrated with all ten other titles in the series. This edition has been extensively updated and expanded to reflect the latest thinking in each of the disciplinary areas included and in topical areas such as compact cities, urban history, place making, sustainable urban development, globalization, cities and climate change, the world city network, the impact of technology on cities, resilient cities, cities in Africa and the Middle East, and urban theory. The new edition places greater emphasis on cities in the developing world, globalization and the global city system of the future. The plate sections have been revised and updated. Sixty generous selections are included: forty-four from the fifth edition, and sixteen new selections, including three newly written exclusively for The City Reader. The sixth edition keeps classic writings by authors such as Ebenezer Howard, Ernest W. Burgess, LeCorbusier, Lewis Mumford, Jane Jacobs, and Louis Wirth, as well as the best contemporary writings of, among others, Peter Hall, Manuel Castells, David Harvey, Saskia Sassen, and Kenneth Jackson. In addition to newly commissioned selections by Yasser Elshestawy, Peter Taylor, and Lawrence Vale, new selections in the sixth edition include writings by Aristotle, Peter Calthorpe, Alberto Camarillo, Filip DeBoech, Edward Glaeser, David Owen, Henri Pirenne, The Project for Public Spaces, Jonas Rabinovich and Joseph Lietman, Doug Saunders, and Bish Sanyal. The anthology features general and section introductions as well as individual introductions to the selected articles introducing the authors, providing context, relating the selection to other selection, and providing a bibliography for further study. The sixth edition includes fifty plates in four plate sections, substantially revised from the fifth edition.

The Righteous Mind

Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion
Author: Jonathan Haidt
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307455777
Category: Philosophy
Page: 500
View: 4099

Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.

Moral Tribes

Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them
Author: Joshua David Greene
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143126059
Category: Philosophy
Page: 422
View: 3551

A path-breaking neuroscientist explores how globalization has illuminated the deep moral divisions between opposing sides, drawing on pioneering research to reveal the evolutionary sources of morality while outlining recommendations for bridging divided cultures.

A Fierce Heart

Finding Strength, Courage, and Wisdom in Any Moment
Author: Spring Washam
Publisher: Parallax Press
ISBN: 1937006778
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 177
View: 8705

“A Fierce Heart is a book whose time is an eternal now: sacred help, made beautifully accessible, by the wild and determined spirit of a no-nonsense female teacher, a bodhisattva, brown as Earth, real as Oxygen.” – Alice Walker, author of The Color Purple Spring Washam is a founder of the East Bay Meditation Center, one of the most diverse and accessible meditation centers in the United States. In A Fierce Heart, Washam shares her contemporary, unique interpretation of the Buddha’s 2,500-year-old teachings with powerfully written chapters that get to the heart of mindfulness, wisdom, and compassion. Woven throughout the book are stories from the author’s life, family, and community, along with many soulful, heartfelt stories from all over the world. Washam’s teachings truly focus on strength, courage and wisdom, making the Dharma welcoming to as large and wide a community as possible. Anyone who has suffered will benefit from the life-saving teachings of this charismatic teacher. Her humor, enthusiasm, and energy are a balm.

Learning to Breathe

One Woman's Journey of Spirit and Survival
Author: Alison Wright
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781594630460
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 271
View: 7096

A spiritual account of the author's survival of a grueling accident and subsequent effort to climb Mount Kilimanjaro describes her suffering, her months of surgeries and physical therapy, and her ascent on her fortieth birthday.

Bowling Alone

The Collapse and Revival of American Community
Author: Robert D. Putnam
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743203046
Category: History
Page: 541
View: 3667

Shows how changes in work, family structure, women's roles, and other factors have caused people to become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and democratic structures--and how they may reconnect.

What Does it Mean to be White?

Developing White Racial Literacy
Author: Robin J. DiAngelo
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9781433111167
Category: Education
Page: 318
View: 8340

What does it mean to be white in a society that proclaims race meaningless yet is deeply divided by race? In the face of pervasive racial inequality and segregation, most whites cannot answer that question. Robin DiAngelo argues that a number of factors make this question difficult for whites miseducation about what racism is; ideologies such as individualism and colorblindness; defensiveness; and a need to protect (rather than expand) our worldviews. These factors contribute to what she terms white racial illiteracy. Speaking as a white person to other white people, Dr. DiAngelo clearly and compellingly takes readers through an analysis of white socialization. She describes how race shapes the lives of white people, explains what makes racism so hard for whites to see, identifies common white racial patterns, and speaks back to popular white narratives that work to deny racism. Written as an accessible introduction to white identity from an anti-racist framework, <I>What Does It Mean To Be White? is an invaluable resource for members of diversity and anti-racism programs and study groups and students of sociology, psychology, education, and other disciplines.

How Jews Became White Folks and what that Says about Race in America


Author: Karen Brodkin
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813525907
Category: History
Page: 243
View: 5005

Recounts how Jews assimilated into, and became accepted by, mainstream white society in the later twentieth century, as they lost their working-class orientation

The Bean Trees

A Novel
Author: Barbara Kingsolver
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061809699
Category: Fiction
Page: 272
View: 6368

The Bean Trees is bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver’s first novel, now widely regarded as a modern classic. It is the charming, engrossing tale of rural Kentucky native Taylor Greer, who only wants to get away from her roots and avoid getting pregnant. She succeeds, but inherits a 3-year-old native-American little girl named Turtle along the way, and together, from Oklahoma to Tucson, Arizona, half-Cherokee Taylor and her charge search for a new life in the West. Written with humor and pathos, this highly praised novel focuses on love and friendship, abandonment and belonging as Taylor, out of money and seemingly out of options, settles in dusty Tucson and begins working at Jesus Is Lord Used Tires while trying to make a life for herself and Turtle. The author of such bestsellers as The Lacuna, The Poinsonwood Bible, and Flight Behavior, Barbara Kingsolver has been hailed for her striking imagery and clear dialogue, and this is the novel that kicked off her remarkable literary career. This edition includes a P.S. section with additional insights from the author, background material, suggestions for further reading, and more.

The Space between Us

Social Geography and Politics
Author: Ryan D. Enos
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108359612
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 448

The Space between Us brings the connection between geography, psychology, and politics to life. By going into the neighborhoods of real cities, Enos shows how our perceptions of racial, ethnic, and religious groups are intuitively shaped by where these groups live and interact daily. Through the lens of numerous examples across the globe and drawing on a compelling combination of research techniques including field and laboratory experiments, big data analysis, and small-scale interactions, this timely book provides a new understanding of how geography shapes politics and how members of groups think about each other. Enos' analysis is punctuated with personal accounts from the field. His rigorous research unfolds in accessible writing that will appeal to specialists and non-specialists alike, illuminating the profound effects of social geography on how we relate to, think about, and politically interact across groups in the fabric of our daily lives.