Diplomacy and the Making of World Politics


Author: Ole Jacob Sending,Vincent Pouliot,Iver B. Neumann
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107099269
Category: Political Science
Page: 384
View: 5118
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Shows how changing diplomatic practices are central in explaining key dimensions of world politics, from law to war.

Diplomatic Theory of International Relations


Author: Paul Sharp
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521760267
Category: Political Science
Page: 339
View: 9516
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This book seeks to identify a body or tradition of diplomatic thinking and construct a diplomatic theory of international relations from it.

International Security in Practice

The Politics of NATO-Russia Diplomacy
Author: Vincent Pouliot
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139484419
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 8452
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How do once bitter enemies move beyond entrenched rivalry at the diplomatic level? In one of the first attempts to apply practice theory to the study of International Relations, Vincent Pouliot builds on Pierre Bourdieu's sociology to devise a theory of practice of security communities and applies it to post-Cold War security relations between NATO and Russia. Based on dozens of interviews and a thorough analysis of recent history, Pouliot demonstrates that diplomacy has become a normal, though not a self-evident, practice between the two former enemies. He argues that this limited pacification is due to the intense symbolic power struggles that have plagued the relationship ever since NATO began its process of enlargement at the geographical and functional levels. So long as Russia and NATO do not cast each other in the roles that they actually play together, security community development is bound to remain limited.

Democracy and Coercive Diplomacy


Author: Kenneth A. Schultz
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521796699
Category: Political Science
Page: 301
View: 1914
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This book, first published in 2001, argues that political competition between government and opposition parties influences threats in international crises.

International Pecking Orders

The Politics and Practice of Multilateral Diplomacy
Author: Vincent Pouliot
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107143438
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 4508
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This book examines the establishment of international hierarchies in multilateral diplomacy. Vincent Pouliot observes that in any multilateral setting, some state representatives weigh much more heavily than others, and argues that the practice of diplomacy is structured by a largely unspoken hierarchy of standing, which practitioners refer to as the 'pecking order'.

At Home with the Diplomats

Inside a European Foreign Ministry
Author: Iver B. Neumann
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801463009
Category: Political Science
Page: 228
View: 2424
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The 2010 WikiLeaks release of 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables has made it eminently clear that there is a vast gulf between the public face of diplomacy and the opinions and actions that take place behind embassy doors. In At Home with the Diplomats, Iver B. Neumann offers unprecedented access to the inner workings of a foreign ministry. Neumann worked for several years at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he had an up-close view of how diplomats conduct their business and how they perceive their own practices. In this book he shows us how diplomacy is conducted on a day-to-day basis. Approaching contemporary diplomacy from an anthropological perspective, Neumann examines the various aspects of diplomatic work and practice, including immunity, permanent representation, diplomatic sociability, accreditation, and issues of gender equality. Neumann shows that the diplomat working abroad and the diplomat at home are engaged in two different modes of knowledge production. Diplomats in the field focus primarily on gathering and processing information. In contrast, the diplomat based in his or her home capital is caught up in the seemingly endless production of texts: reports, speeches, position papers, and the like. Neumann leaves the reader with a keen sense of the practices of diplomacy: relations with foreign ministries, mediating between other people's positions while integrating personal and professional into a cohesive whole, adherence to compulsory routines and agendas, and, above all, the generation of knowledge. Yet even as they come to master such quotidian tasks, diplomats are regularly called upon to do exceptional things, such as negotiating peace.

Face-to-Face Diplomacy

Social Neuroscience and International Relations
Author: Marcus Holmes
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108271731
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 5590
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Face-to-face diplomacy has long been the lynchpin of world politics, yet it is largely dismissed by scholars of International Relations as unimportant. Marcus Holmes argues that dismissing this type of diplomacy is in stark contrast to what leaders and policy makers deem as essential and that this view is rooted in a particular set of assumptions that see an individual's intentions as fundamentally inaccessible. Building on recent evidence from social neuroscience and psychology, Holmes argues that this assumption is problematic. Marcus Holmes studies some of the most important moments of diplomacy in the twentieth century, from 'Munich' to the end of the Cold War, and by showing how face-to-face interactions allowed leaders to either reassure each other of benign defensive intentions or pick up on offensive intentions, his book challenges the notion that intentions are fundamentally unknowable in international politics, a central idea in IR theory.

Diplomacy

Communication and the Origins of International Order
Author: Robert F. Trager
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107049164
Category: Political Science
Page: 318
View: 2385
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This book explores questions such as: How do adversaries communicate? How do diplomatic encounters shape international orders and determine whether states go to war?

Narrative and the Making of US National Security


Author: Ronald R. Krebs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107103959
Category: Political Science
Page: 410
View: 726
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Shows how dominant narratives have shaped the national security policies of the United States.

Quasi-States

Sovereignty, International Relations and the Third World
Author: Robert H. Jackson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521447836
Category: Law
Page: 225
View: 3866
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Robert Jackson examines the birth and survival of Third World nations since the end of the Second World War. He describes these countries as "quasi-states," arguing that they exist more by the support and indulgence of the international community than by the abilities and efforts of their own governments and peoples. He investigates the international normative framework that upholds sovereign statehood in the Third World. This he calls "negative sovereignty" and contrasts it with what he sees as the "positive sovereignty" that emerged in Europe along with the modern state. Within this structure, he examines how negative sovereignty arose, and its mechanisms and consequences for both international politics and the domestic conditions of quasi-states. He concludes by assessing the future of quasi-states and the institution of negative sovereignty.

Trust and Mistrust in International Relations


Author: Andrew H. Kydd
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691121703
Category: Political Science
Page: 284
View: 739
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The difference between war and peace can be a matter of trust. States that trust each other can cooperate and remain at peace. States that mistrust each other enough can wage preventive wars, attacking now in fear that the other side will attack in the future. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Kydd develops a theory of trust in international relations and applies it to the Cold War. Grounded in a realist tradition but arriving at conclusions very different from current realist approaches, this theory is the first systematic game theoretic approach to trust in international relations, and is also the first to explicitly consider how we as external observers should make inferences about the trustworthiness of states. Kydd makes three major claims. First, while trustworthy states may enter conflict, when we see conflict we should become more convinced that the states involved are untrustworthy. Second, strong states, traditionally thought to promote cooperation, can do so only if they are relatively trustworthy. Third, even states that strongly mistrust each other can reassure each other and cooperate provided they are trustworthy. The book's historical chapters focus on the growing mistrust at the beginning of the Cold War. Contrary to the common view that both sides were willing to compromise but failed because of mistrust, Kydd argues that most of the mistrust in the Cold War was justified, because the Soviets were not trustworthy.

Protestantism and Patriotism

Ideologies and the Making of English Foreign Policy, 1650-1668
Author: Steven C. A. Pincus
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521893688
Category: History
Page: 524
View: 2394
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A detailed study of the first two Anglo-Dutch Wars and the ideological contexts in which they were fought.

The Global Transformation

History, Modernity and the Making of International Relations
Author: Barry Buzan,George Lawson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131623990X
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 5565
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The 'long nineteenth century' (1776–1914) was a period of political, economic, military and cultural revolutions that re-forged both domestic and international societies. Neither existing international histories nor international relations texts sufficiently register the scale and impact of this 'global transformation', yet it is the consequences of these multiple revolutions that provide the material and ideational foundations of modern international relations. Global modernity reconstituted the mode of power that underpinned international order and opened a power gap between those who harnessed the revolutions of modernity and those who were denied access to them. This gap dominated international relations for two centuries and is only now being closed. By taking the global transformation as the starting point for international relations, this book repositions the roots of the discipline and establishes a new way of both understanding and teaching the relationship between world history and international relations.

Strategic Narratives

Communication Power and the New World Order
Author: Alister Miskimmon,Ben O'Loughlin,Laura Roselle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317975197
Category: Political Science
Page: 240
View: 1218
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Communication is central to how we understand international affairs. Political leaders, diplomats, and citizens recognize that communication shapes global politics. This has only been amplified in a new media environment characterized by Internet access to information, social media, and the transformation of who can communicate and how. Soft power, public diplomacy 2.0, network power – scholars and policymakers are concerned with understanding what is happening. This book is the first to develop a systematic framework to understand how political actors seek to shape order through narrative projection in this new environment. To explain the changing world order – the rise of the BRICS, the dilemmas of climate change, poverty and terrorism, the intractability of conflict – the authors explore how actors form and project narratives and how third parties interpret and interact with these narratives. The concept of strategic narrative draws together the most salient of international relations concepts, including the links between power and ideas; international and domestic; and state and non-state actors. The book is anchored around four themes: order, actors, uncertainty, and contestation. Through these, Strategic Narratives shows both the possibilities and the limits of communication and power, and makes an important contribution to theorizing and studying empirically contemporary international relations. International Studies Association: International Communication Best Book Award

Peace and War

Armed Conflicts and International Order, 1648-1989
Author: Kalevi Jaakko Holsti
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521399296
Category: Political Science
Page: 379
View: 6504
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Professor Holsti examines the origins of war and the foundations of peace of the last 350 years.

Soft Power

The Means To Success In World Politics
Author: Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 0786738960
Category: Political Science
Page: 208
View: 1429
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Joseph Nye coined the term "soft power" in the late 1980s. It is now used frequently—and often incorrectly—by political leaders, editorial writers, and academics around the world. So what is soft power? Soft power lies in the ability to attract and persuade. Whereas hard power—the ability to coerce—grows out of a country's military or economic might, soft power arises from the attractiveness of a country's culture, political ideals, and policies. Hard power remains crucial in a world of states trying to guard their independence and of non-state groups willing to turn to violence. It forms the core of the Bush administration's new national security strategy. But according to Nye, the neo-conservatives who advise the president are making a major miscalculation: They focus too heavily on using America's military power to force other nations to do our will, and they pay too little heed to our soft power. It is soft power that will help prevent terrorists from recruiting supporters from among the moderate majority. And it is soft power that will help us deal with critical global issues that require multilateral cooperation among states. That is why it is so essential that America better understands and applies our soft power. This book is our guide.

The Oxford Handbook of International Relations


Author: Christian Reus-Smit,Duncan Snidal
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019958558X
Category: Law
Page: 772
View: 9110
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This Oxford Handbook assembles the world's leading scholars in International Relations to present diverse perspectives about purposes, questions, theories, and methods. It will become the first point of reference for scholars and students interested in these key issues.

The Making of International Human Rights

The 1960s, Decolonization, and the Reconstruction of Global Values
Author: Steven L. B. Jensen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316531309
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 2887
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This book fundamentally reinterprets the history of international human rights in the post-1945 era by documenting how pivotal the Global South was for their breakthrough. In stark contrast to other contemporary human rights historians who have focused almost exclusively on the 1940s and the 1970s - heavily privileging Western agency - Steven L. B. Jensen convincingly argues that it was in the 1960s that universal human rights had their breakthrough. This is a ground-breaking work that places race and religion at the center of these developments and focuses on a core group of states who led the human rights breakthrough, namely Jamaica, Liberia, Ghana, and the Philippines. They transformed the norms upon which the international community today is built. Their efforts in the 1960s post-colonial moment laid the foundation - in profound and surprising ways - for the so-called human rights revolution in the 1970s, when Western activists and states began to embrace human rights.

Security Beyond the State

Private Security in International Politics
Author: Rita Abrahamsen,Michael C. Williams
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139493124
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 8074
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Across the globe, from mega-cities to isolated resource enclaves, the provision and governance of security takes place within assemblages that are de-territorialized in terms of actors, technologies, norms and discourses. They are embedded in a complex transnational architecture, defying conventional distinctions between public and private, global and local. Drawing on theories of globalization and late modernity, along with insights from criminology, political science and sociology, Security Beyond the State maps the emergence of the global private security sector and develops a novel analytical framework for understanding these global security assemblages. Through in-depth examinations of four African countries – Kenya, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and South Africa – it demonstrates how global security assemblages affect the distribution of social power, the dynamics of state stability, and the operations of the international political economy, with significant implications for who gets secured and how in a global era.

US Foreign Policy and the Iran Hostage Crisis


Author: David Patrick Houghton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521805094
Category: History
Page: 252
View: 3204
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Why did a handful of Iranian students seize the American embassy in Tehran in November 1979? Why did most members of the US government initially believe that the incident would be over quickly? Why did the Carter administration then decide to launch a rescue mission, and why did it fail so spectacularly? US Foreign Policy and the Iran Hostage Crisis examines these puzzles and others, using an analogical reasoning approach to decision-making, a theoretical perspective which highlights the role played by historical analogies in the genesis of foreign policy decisions. Using interviews with key decision-makers on both sides, Houghton provides an analysis of one of the United States' greatest foreign policy disasters, the events of which continue to poison relations between the two states. The book will be of interest to students and scholars of foreign policy analysis and international relations.