Getting in the Game

Title IX and the Women's Sports Revolution
Author: Deborah L. Brake
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814760392
Category: Law
Page: 320
View: 9325
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The first legal analysis of Title IX assesses the successes and failures of the landmark federal statute enacted in 1972 to prohibit sex discrimination in education,

Understanding Women’s Rights


Author: Jacqueline Ching,Mike Gordon
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 1448846722
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 168
View: 9529
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Discusses the history of women's rights in the United States, from the colonial era to the modern day, including the women's suffrage movement, twentieth-century feminism, and modern post-feminist America.

Invisible Seasons

Title IX and the Fight for Equity in College Sports
Author: Kelly Belanger
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 0815653824
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 461
View: 3178
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In 1979, a group of women athletes at Michigan State University, their civil rights attorney, the institution’s Title IX coordinator, and a close circle of college students used the law to confront a powerful institution—their own university. By the mid-1970s, opposition from the NCAA had made intercollegiate athletics the most controversial part of Title IX, the 1972 federal law prohibiting discrimi nation in all federally funded education programs and activities. At the same time, some of the most motivated, highly skilled women athletes in colleges and universities could no longer tolerate the long-standing differences between men’s and women‘s separate but obviously unequal sports programs. In Invisible Seasons, Belanger recalls the remarkable story of how the MSU women athletes helped change the landscape of higher education athletics. They learned the hard way that even groundbreaking civil rights laws are not self-executing. This behind-the-scenes look at a university sports program challenges us all to think about what it really means to put equality into practice, especially in the money-driven world of college sports.

Tilting the Playing Field

Schools, Sports, Sex, and
Author: Jessica Gavora
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 181
View: 8678
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Examines the controversial Title IX, and discusses how its purpose to create equal opportunity for women has brought about changes in the academic sports world.

Equal Play

Title IX and Social Change
Author: Nancy Hogshead-Makar,Andrew S. Zimbalist
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781592133796
Category: Education
Page: 313
View: 5506
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Equal Play; Title IX and Social Change collects the best, up-to-date scholarship, court cases, and other useful materials showing how the governmental processes have influenced the implementation of one of the country's most important social goals: equality in athletics.

Living the Revolution

Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945
Author: Jennifer Guglielmo
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807898222
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 3878
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Italians were the largest group of immigrants to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, and hundreds of thousands led and participated in some of the period's most volatile labor strikes. Jennifer Guglielmo brings to life the Italian working-class women of New York and New Jersey who helped shape the vibrant radical political culture that expanded into the emerging industrial union movement. Tracing two generations of women who worked in the needle and textile trades, she explores the ways immigrant women and their American-born daughters drew on Italian traditions of protest to form new urban female networks of everyday resistance and political activism. She also shows how their commitment to revolutionary and transnational social movements diminished as they became white working-class Americans.

A Quiet Revolution

The Veil's Resurgence, from the Middle East to America
Author: Leila Ahmed
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300175051
Category: RELIGION
Page: 361
View: 7439
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In Cairo in the 1940s, Leila Ahmed was raised by a generation of women who never dressed in the veils and headscarves their mothers and grandmothers had worn. To them, these coverings seemed irrelevant to both modern life and Islamic piety. Today, however, the majority of Muslim women throughout the Islamic world again wear the veil. Why, Ahmed asks, did this change take root so swiftly, and what does this shift mean for women, Islam, and the West? When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil's return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations. Ahmed observed that Islamism, with its commitments to activism in the service of the poor and in pursuit of social justice, is the strain of Islam most easily and naturally merging with western democracies' own tradition of activism in the cause of justice and social change. It is often Islamists, even more than secular Muslims, who are at the forefront of such contemporary activist struggles as civil rights and women's rights. Ahmed's surprising conclusions represent a near reversal of her thinking on this topic. Richly insightful, intricately drawn, and passionately argued, this absorbing story of the veil's resurgence, from Egypt through Saudi Arabia and into the West, suggests a dramatically new portrait of contemporary Islam.

Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology

The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America
Author: Allan Collins,Richard Halverson
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807759066
Category: Education
Page: 192
View: 1606
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This landmark book translates positive and asset-based understandings of organizations to develop a powerful model of school leadership that is grounded in both existing research and the complexities of life in schools. The authors - both senior scholars in educational leadership - apply insights from positive psychology to the role and function of educational leaders. The Positive School Leadership (PSL) model draws on the strengths of relationships among staff and the broader school community to communicate and instill shared values and a common mission. This book builds a compelling case for creating a more inclusive, less "mechanistic" approach to leadership. Designed to engage both the hearts and minds of readers, the text is organized around reflective questioning of educational practice and current assumptions about the purposes and goals of leadership in schools.

Coming On Strong

Gender and Sexuality in Women's Sport
Author: Susan K Cahn
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252097521
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 416
View: 1272
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Acclaimed since its original publication, Coming on Strong has become a much-cited touchstone in scholarship on women and sports. In this new edition, Susan K. Cahn updates her detailed history of women's sport and the struggles over gender, sexuality, race, class, and policy that have often defined it. A new chapter explores the impact of Title IX and how the opportunities and interest in sports it helped create reshaped women's lives even as the legislation itself came under sustained attack.

Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of Revolution


Author: Peter McLaren
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742573028
Category: Education
Page: 256
View: 4863
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Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of Revolution examines what is currently at stake_culturally, politically, and educationally_in contemporary global capitalist society. Written by one of the world's most renowned critical educators, this book evaluates the message of Che Guevara and Paulo Freire for contemporary politics in general and education in particular. Forcefully argued and eloquently written, Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of Revolution is a clarion call for building a new social order premised on the ideas and philosophy of two of the most important revolutionary figures of this century. It is an indispensable reference point for building transnational alliances between the North American and Latin American.Che Guevara, Paulo Freire is the best introduction available to the ideas and philosophy of these two iconoclastic figures.

The Feminist Revolution

The Struggle for Women's Liberation
Author: Bonnie J. Morris,D-M Withers
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588346129
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 7276
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"Collection of essays, oral histories, and illustrations depicting the feminist revolution"--

Defiance of the Patriots


Author: N.A
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300168454
Category: Boston (Mass.)
Page: 311
View: 9622
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From the Publisher: On the evening of December 16, 1773, a group of disguised Bostonians boarded three merchant ships and dumped more than forty-six tons of tea into Boston Harbor. The Boston Tea Party, as it later came to be known, was an audacious and revolutionary act. It set the stage for war and cemented certain values in the American psyche that many still cherish today. But why did the Tea Party happen? Whom did it involve? What did it mean? The answers to these questions are far from straightforward. In this thrilling new book, Benjamin L. Carp tells the full story of the Tea Party-exploding myths, exploring the unique city life of Boston, and setting this extraordinary event in a global context for the first time. Bringing vividly to life the diverse array of people and places that the Tea Party brought together-from Chinese tea-pickers to English businessmen, Native American tribes, sugar plantation slaves, and Boston's ladies of leisure-Carp illuminates how a determined group shook the foundations of a mighty empire, and what this has meant for Americans since. As he reveals many little-known historical facts and considers the Tea Party's uncertain legacy, he presents a compelling and expansive history of an iconic event in America's tempestuous past.

Witness to the Revolution

Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year America Lost Its Mind and Found Its Soul
Author: Clara Bingham
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679644741
Category: History
Page: 656
View: 3777
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The electrifying story of the turbulent year when the sixties ended and America teetered on the edge of revolution NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH As the 1960s drew to a close, the United States was coming apart at the seams. From August 1969 to August 1970, the nation witnessed nine thousand protests and eighty-four acts of arson or bombings at schools across the country. It was the year of the My Lai massacre investigation, the Cambodia invasion, Woodstock, and the Moratorium to End the War. The American death toll in Vietnam was approaching fifty thousand, and the ascendant counterculture was challenging nearly every aspect of American society. Witness to the Revolution, Clara Bingham’s unique oral history of that tumultuous time, unveils anew that moment when America careened to the brink of a civil war at home, as it fought a long, futile war abroad. Woven together from one hundred original interviews, Witness to the Revolution provides a firsthand narrative of that period of upheaval in the words of those closest to the action—the activists, organizers, radicals, and resisters who manned the barricades of what Students for a Democratic Society leader Tom Hayden called “the Great Refusal.” We meet Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn of the Weather Underground; Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department employee who released the Pentagon Papers; feminist theorist Robin Morgan; actor and activist Jane Fonda; and many others whose powerful personal stories capture the essence of an era. We witness how the killing of four students at Kent State turned a straitlaced social worker into a hippie, how the civil rights movement gave birth to the women’s movement, and how opposition to the war in Vietnam turned college students into prisoners, veterans into peace marchers, and intellectuals into bombers. With lessons that can be applied to our time, Witness to the Revolution is more than just a record of the death throes of the Age of Aquarius. Today, when America is once again enmeshed in racial turmoil, extended wars overseas, and distrust of the government, the insights contained in this book are more relevant than ever. Praise for Witness to the Revolution “Especially for younger generations who didn’t live through it, Witness to the Revolution is a valuable and entertaining primer on a moment in American history the likes of which we may never see again.”—Bryan Burrough, The Wall Street Journal “A gripping oral history of the centrifugal social forces tearing America apart at the end of the ’60s . . . This is rousing reportage from the front lines of US history.”—O: The Oprah Magazine “The familiar voices and the unfamiliar ones are woven together with documents to make this a surprisingly powerful and moving book.”—New York Times Book Review “[An] Enthralling and brilliant chronology of the period between August 1969 and September 1970.”—Buffalo News “[Bingham] captures the essence of these fourteen months through the words of movement organizers, vets, students, draft resisters, journalists, musicians, government agents, writers, and others. . . . This oral history will enable readers to see that era in a new light and with fresh sympathy for the motivations of those involved. While Bingham’s is one of many retrospective looks at that period, it is one of the most immediate and personal.”—Booklist

The Whites of Their Eyes

The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History
Author: Jill Lepore
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400839810
Category: History
Page: 232
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Americans have always put the past to political ends. The Union laid claim to the Revolution--so did the Confederacy. Civil rights leaders said they were the true sons of liberty--so did Southern segregationists. This book tells the story of the centuries-long struggle over the meaning of the nation's founding, including the battle waged by the Tea Party, Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, and evangelical Christians to "take back America." Jill Lepore, Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer, offers a careful and concerned look at American history according to the far right, from the "rant heard round the world," which launched the Tea Party, to the Texas School Board's adoption of a social-studies curriculum that teaches that the United States was established as a Christian nation. Along the way, she provides rare insight into the eighteenth-century struggle for independence--a history of the Revolution, from the archives. Lepore traces the roots of the far right's reactionary history to the bicentennial in the 1970s, when no one could agree on what story a divided nation should tell about its unruly beginnings. Behind the Tea Party's Revolution, she argues, lies a nostalgic and even heartbreaking yearning for an imagined past--a time less troubled by ambiguity, strife, and uncertainty--a yearning for an America that never was. The Whites of Their Eyes reveals that the far right has embraced a narrative about America's founding that is not only a fable but is also, finally, a variety of fundamentalism--anti-intellectual, antihistorical, and dangerously antipluralist. In a new afterword, Lepore addresses both the recent shift in Tea Party rhetoric from the Revolution to the Constitution and the diminished role of scholars as political commentators over the last half century of public debate.

The Victims' Revolution

The Rise of Identity Studies and the Closing of the Liberal Mind
Author: Bruce Bawer
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062097067
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 6075
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Respected author, critic, and essayist Bruce Bawer—whose previous book, While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam Is Destroying the West from Within, was a New York Times bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist—now offers a trenchant and sweeping critique of the sorry state of higher education since the campus revolutions of the late ’60s and early ’70s. In The Victims’ Revolution, Bawer incisively contends that the rise of identity-based college courses and disciplines (Women’s Studies, Black Studies, Gay Studies, etc.) forty years ago has resulted in an impoverishment of thought and widespread political confusion, while filling the brains of students with politically correct mush. Timely, controversial, and brilliantly argued, Bawer’s The Victims’ Revolution is necessary reading for students, educators, and anyone concerned about the contemporary crisis in academia—a serious and important work that stands with other essential books on the subject, like The Shadow University by Alan Kors, Illiberal Education by Dinesh D’Souza, and Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind.

The Great Railroad Revolution

The History of Trains in America
Author: Christian Wolmar
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610391802
Category: Transportation
Page: 448
View: 4440
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America was made by the railroads. The opening of the Baltimore & Ohio line––the first American railroad––in the 1830s sparked a national revolution in the way that people lived thanks to the speed and convenience of train travel. Promoted by visionaries and built through heroic effort, the American railroad network was bigger in every sense than Europe’s, and facilitated everything from long-distance travel to commuting and transporting goods to waging war. It united far-flung parts of the country, boosted economic development, and was the catalyst for America’s rise to world-power status. Every American town, great or small, aspired to be connected to a railroad and by the turn of the century, almost every American lived within easy access of a station. By the early 1900s, the United States was covered in a latticework of more than 200,000 miles of railroad track and a series of magisterial termini, all built and controlled by the biggest corporations in the land. The railroads dominated the American landscape for more than a hundred years but by the middle of the twentieth century, the automobile, the truck, and the airplane had eclipsed the railroads and the nation started to forget them. In The Great Railroad Revolution, renowned railroad expert Christian Wolmar tells the extraordinary story of the rise and the fall of the greatest of all American endeavors, and argues that the time has come for America to reclaim and celebrate its often-overlooked rail heritage.

The New woman's survival sourcebook


Author: Kirsten Grimstad,Susan Rennie
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf
ISBN: N.A
Category: Reference
Page: 245
View: 5262
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Gender Relations in Sport


Author: Emily A. Roper
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462094551
Category: Education
Page: 186
View: 3654
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Designed primarily as a textbook for upper division undergraduate courses in gender and sport, gender issues, sport sociology, cultural sport studies, and women’s studies, Gender Relations in Sport provides a comprehensive examination of the intersecting themes and concepts surrounding the study of gender and sport. The 16 contributors, leading scholars from sport studies, present key issues, current research perspectives and theoretical developments within nine sub-areas of gender and sport: • Gender and sport participation • Theories of gender and sport • Gender and sport media • Sexual identity and sport • Intersections of race, ethnicity and gender in sport • Framing Title IX policy using conceptual metaphors • Studying the athletic body • Sexual harassment and abuse in sport • Historical developments and current issues from a European perspective The intersecting themes and concepts across chapters are also accentuated. Such a publication provides access to the study of gender relations in sport to students across a variety of disciplines. Emily A. Roper, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health and Kinesiology at Sam Houston State University. Her research focuses on gender, sexuality, and sport.

A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley


Author: Jane Kamensky
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393608611
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 9650
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“A sensory tour de force.” —Caitlin Fitz, The Atlantic In this intimate portrait of the painter John Singleton Copley and his extraordinary times, award-winning Harvard historian Jane Kamensky gives “a wonderfully fresh and surprising perspective on the American Revolution” (Stephen Greenblatt), a world riven by divided loyalties and tangled sympathies. Though Copley’s prodigious talent earned him the patronage of Boston’s patriot leaders, including Samuel Adams and Paul Revere, he did not share their politics and lamented America’s provincialism. When painting portraits failed to satisfy his lofty ambitions and colonial resistance escalated, Copley looked longingly across the Atlantic, repatriating to London where he gained renown as the painter of Britain’s American War. With a “vibrant prose style, Kamensky probes deeply” (New York Times), bringing new insight to this tumultuous period as seen through a towering figure of both Britain’s and America’s artistic legacies.

The Campus Rape Frenzy

The Attack on Due Process at America's Universities
Author: KC Johnson,Stuart Taylor, Jr.
Publisher: Encounter Books
ISBN: 1594039887
Category: Education
Page: 384
View: 2892
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In recent years, politicians led by President Obama and prominent senators and governors have teamed with extremists on campus to portray our nation’s campuses as awash in a violent crime wave—and to suggest (preposterously) that university leaders, professors, and students are indifferent to female sexual assault victims in their midst. Neither of these claims has any bearing in reality. But they have achieved widespread acceptance, thanks in part to misleading alarums from the Obama administration and biased media coverage led by the New York Times. The frenzy about campus rape has helped stimulate—and has been fanned by—ideologically skewed campus sexual assault policies and lawless commands issued by federal bureaucrats to force the nation’s all-too-compliant colleges and universities essentially to presume the guilt of accused students. The result has been a widespread disregard of such bedrock American principles as the presumption of innocence and the need for fair play. This book uses hard facts to set the record straight. It explores, among other things, about two dozen of the many cases since 2010 in which innocent or probably innocent students have been branded as sex criminals and expelled or otherwise punished by their colleges. And it shows why all students—and, eventually, society as a whole—are harmed when our nation’s universities abandon pursuit of truth and seek instead to accommodate the passions of the mob.