Immigration Law


Author: BarCharts, Inc
Publisher: Quickstudy
ISBN: 9781423217664
Category: Law
Page: 6
View: 6646
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With immigration law playing a greater role in the contemporary American judicial system, the newly updated 2011 version of our popular Immigration Law study guide is a one-stop resource for both law students and practicing attorneys. Jam-packed with all the latest information, this guide is known for its user-friendly format that includes color-coded sections--featuring key definitions and specific case examples--for each area of immigration law.

Immigration Law and Procedure in a Nutshell


Author: David S. Weissbrodt,Laura Danielson,Howard S. Myers (III)
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781683288985
Category: Emigration and immigration law
Page: 760
View: 3346
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This compact, comprehensive title offers a thorough overview of the history, constitutional basis, statutory structure, regulatory provisions, administrative procedure, and ethical principles related to immigration law and practice. Updated to reflect developments since the 2016 Presidential election, it is valuable both as a teaching and a practice reference.

Immigration Law

A Guide to Laws and Regulations
Author: Marc R. Generazio
Publisher: Amer Bar Assn
ISBN: 9781616320812
Category: Law
Page: 209
View: 9874
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A comprehensive guide to the complex United States immigration system, ABA Fundamentals' Immigration Law: A Guide to Laws and Regulations is the essential book for lawyers working in the immigration field, people applying for immigration benefits, students studying U.S. immigration laws, corporate counselors, police officers, and community groups.

Immigration Law for Paralegals


Author: Maria Isabel Casablanca,Gloria Roa Bodin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781611635140
Category: Emigration and immigration law
Page: 492
View: 5556
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Immigration Law for Paralegals is an indispensable and practical guide on U.S. immigration, citizenship and visa procedures for instructing and training students or anyone interested in a career as an immigration paralegal or legal assistant. This fourth edition updates and expands the third, including coverage of Provisional Unlawful Presence Waiver and DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). Contents of Immigration Law for Paralegals include: interviewing, gathering information, case management and document preparation techniques; analysis of temporary and permanent employment visas; analysis of family-based petitions, political asylum and naturalization; as well as samples of completed applications, a glossary of terms and useful appendices. Each visa category is set forth in a clear and concise manner, with real-life and hypothetical situations at the end of each chapter, allowing students to visualize actual problems and issues that arise when processing a case. Further, in responding to the hypothetical situations, students will look to the United States immigration statutes, rules and regulations and precedent and administrative policies to resolve issues. Additionally, each section contains a completed sample application, definition of legal terms, and exercises modeled after tasks paralegals may encounter on the job, including the preparation of relative petitions (Form I-130) and the adjustment of a status package (Forms I-485, G-325A, I-131, I-765, I-864A, and G-28). In keeping with the concise format of each chapter, excerpts from Federal, AAO, and BIA decisions will be cited or footnoted where relevant. The Glossary and Appendices include Immigration Law resources; USCIS Local, Regional and Service Center addresses; questions and answers for the naturalization exam; blank USCIS forms; Credential Evaluation sample request forms and a list of agencies; sample USCIS color photograph specifications, sample medical form (I-688); and IRS Individual Tax ID Number Request (SS-4). The fourth edition includes a CD with fillable PDF forms.

Immigration Law

Keyed To Courses Using Aleinikoff, Martin, Motomura and Fullerton's Immigration and Citizenship
Author: Aspen Publishers,Casenote Legal Briefs
Publisher: Aspen Publishers Online
ISBN: 0735570485
Category: Law
Page: 122
View: 4213
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After your casebook, Casenote Legal Briefs will be your most important reference source for the entire semester. It is the most popular legal briefs series available, with over 140 titles, and is relied on by thousands of students for its expert case summaries, comprehensive analysis of concurrences and dissents, as well as of the majority opinion in the briefs. Casenote Legal Briefs Features: Keyed to specific casebooks by title/author Most current briefs available Redesigned for greater student accessibility Sample brief with element descriptions called out Redesigned chapter opener provides rule of law and page number for each brief Quick Course Outline chart included with major titles Revised glossary in dictionary format

Immigration Law Handbook 2013


Author: Margaret Phelan,James Gillespie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199659702
Category: Law
Page: 1771
View: 2044
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Providing an invaluable reference for immigration practitioners, this book builds on the proven success of previous editions to offer the most up-to-date coverage of recent immigration legislation, selected and annotated by experts with a wealth of practical experience.

Understanding Immigration Law


Author: Kevin R. Johnson,Raquel Aldana,Bill Ong Hing,Leticia Saucedo
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 0769881971
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 9595
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The Second Edition of Understanding Immigration Law lays out the basics of U.S. immigration law in an accessible way to newcomers to the field. It offers background about the intellectual, historical, and constitutional foundations of U.S. immigration law. The eBook also identifies the factors that have historically fueled migration to the United States, including the economic "pull" of jobs and family in the United States and the "push" of economic hardship, political instability, and other facts of life in the sending country. In the middle chapters, the authors provide a capsule summary of the law concerning the admissions and removal procedures and criteria in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The book ends with a chapter speculating about the future of U.S. immigration law and the challenges and opportunities facing the nation. This eBook provides a comprehensive overview of U.S. immigration law. It has been designed to supplement the most widely adopted immigration law casebooks. The eBook versions of this title feature links to Lexis Advance for further legal research options.

Immigration Fraud

Fixing Loopholes in Immigration Law
Author: B. R. Konda
Publisher: Freedom View Publishing LLC
ISBN: 0999726838
Category: Law
Page: 152
View: 4150
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Current Immigration Law is riddled with loopholes waiting to be exploited by opportunists, fraudsters, and in some cases lawyers. Every single chapter highlights the statutory intent of the law, loopholes and exploitation by objectively verifiable evidence. Since 2010, requests for grant of immigrant benefits are astronomical. Sometimes, federal immigration agencies are blind-sided by lack of resources in the form of man-power and technology infrastructure. Intent of this book is to bring awareness about the perils of exploitation of federal laws and its impact to the public, immigration agencies and legal community at large. Exposure of exploitation and change in perception starts with advocacy! “In 2015, only 6% of the Immigrants gained Permanent Residence based on Skills, Education or an Ability to Invest in the United States!” – Excerpt from the Book. “Immigration is not a right by freedom of choice, when you exploit, abuse and commit fraud.” – B.R. Konda

What Every Lawyer Needs to Know about Immigration Law


Author: Jennifer A. Hermansky,Kate Kalmykov
Publisher: Amer Bar Assn
ISBN: 9781627225434
Category: Law
Page: 562
View: 3959
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Given the many ways in which immigration law can affect a single individual as well as as large corporation, most lawyers will encounter a client needing immigration law advice. Yet for the nonspecialist, immigration law can be daunting, particularly because it is governed by a complex mix of statutes, regulations, and federal and administrative court guidance as well as by adjudicatory policies from multiple administrative agencies. Thus, it is important for lawyers to understand how best to spot immigration issues for clients, and when to involve an immigration attorney for assistance with a client. This book was written by immigration law specialists who insights, guidance, and practice tips can offer help in understanding these issues. The book is meant to provide attorneys working in various areas of law with enough information to identify problematic immigration issues, counsel their clients accordingly and if the matter is advanced to know when to advise the client to consult with immigration counsel.It will also introduce attorneys to the myriad of agencies involved in the immigration process."

Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States

Selected Statutes, Regulations, Forms 2018
Author: T. Alexander Aleinkoff,David Martin,Hiroshi Motomura,Maryellen Fullerton
Publisher: West Academic Publishing
ISBN: 9781640208858
Category:
Page: 1174
View: 5468
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Aleinikoff, Martin, Motomura, Fullerton, and Stumpf's Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States: Selected Statutes, Regulations and Forms serves as a one-stop source for federal immigration legislation and other primary source materials. A staple in classrooms nationwide, this publication: Includes the most important federal, state, and local legislation affecting immigration and citizenship Supplements any teaching materials on its subject Includes selected statutes, regulations and forms

Occupational Outlook Handbook 2009


Author: U. S. Department of Labor
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1602393206
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 890
View: 5739
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A directory for up-and-coming jobs in the near-future employment market includes recommendations for finding or advancing a career and draws on statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor, in a guide that includes coverage of more than 250 occupations. Original.

Migrants at Work

Immigration and Vulnerability in Labour Law
Author: Cathryn Costello,Mark Freedland
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198714106
Category: Law
Page: 461
View: 7787
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There is a highly significant and under-considered intersection and interaction between migration law and labour law. Labour lawyers have tended to regard migration law as generally speaking outside their purview, and migration lawyers have somewhat similarly tended to neglect labour law. Examining and clarifying the interactions between migration, migration law and labour law, the book particularly focuses on how migration status has a bearing on labourrelations and the world of work. Contributors to the volume identify the many ways that migration law, as currently designed, divides the objectives of labour law, privileging employer concerns over the supplyof labour over worker-protective concerns. In addition, migration law creates a particular form of status, which affects labour relations, thereby dividing the subjects of labour law. Written by leading scholars of labour law, migration law, and migration studies, this book provides a diverse and multidisciplinary approach to this field of legal interaction, of interest to academics, policymakers, legal practitioners, trade unions, and migrants' groups alike.

The Human Rights of Migrants in European Law


Author: Cathryn Costello
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199644748
Category: Law
Page: 350
View: 9540
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A critical discussion of EU and ECHR migration and refugee law, this book analyses the law on asylum and immigration of third country-nationals. It focuses on how the EU norms interact with ECHR human rights case law on migration, and the pitfalls of European human rights pluralism.

Immigration Law Pocket Field Guide


Author: Publisher's Editorial Staff
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 1522147543
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 1756
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​This latest edition of the Immigration Law Pocket Field Guide from LexisNexis is an essential item for any law enforcement professional who deals with immigration law on a regular basis. It contains the primary law you need to do your job in an easy-to-use format with convenient charts for quick reference. Keep it with you for ready access to accurate Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Classifications, crimes with significant immigration consequences, grounds of admissibility, Nationality charts, Vienna Convention consular notification and access requirements, and more. Updated annually with the latest changes in this constantly evolving area of law, with an available subscription service so you can stay informed.

Hitler's American Model

The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law
Author: James Q. Whitman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884632
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 5331
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How American race law provided a blueprint for Nazi Germany Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler's American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Contrary to those who have insisted that there was no meaningful connection between American and German racial repression, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. As Whitman shows, the Nuremberg Laws were crafted in an atmosphere of considerable attention to the precedents American race laws had to offer. German praise for American practices, already found in Hitler's Mein Kampf, was continuous throughout the early 1930s, and the most radical Nazi lawyers were eager advocates of the use of American models. But while Jim Crow segregation was one aspect of American law that appealed to Nazi radicals, it was not the most consequential one. Rather, both American citizenship and antimiscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Laws—the Citizenship Law and the Blood Law. Whitman looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened, but too harsh. Indelibly linking American race laws to the shaping of Nazi policies in Germany, Hitler's American Model upends understandings of America's influence on racist practices in the wider world.

Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law


Author: Gina Clayton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198747551
Category: Asylum, Right of
Page: 672
View: 8377
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The seventh edition of Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law continues to provide students with expert coverage of case law and legislation, along with dynamic analysis of the political context and social impact of the law, and a strong focus on human rights. Including key case summaries, chapter questions and further reading, the book deftly guides the reader through this fascinating and constantly developing area of law, using clear and accessible language throughout. An ideal guide for all students of the subject. This book is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre, which contains the following resources designed to support the book: - Updates providing easy access to changes and developments in the law - Problem questions to test knowledge and develop analytical skill - Guidance on how to answer the end-of-chapter questions - A selection of web links to support additional research

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America


Author: Richard Rothstein
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 1631492861
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 5321
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"Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation." —William Julius Wilson In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation—that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation—the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north. As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. “The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book” (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothstein’s invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.

Expelling the Poor

Atlantic Seaboard States and the Nineteenth-Century Origins of American Immigration Policy
Author: Hidetaka Hirota,Visiting Assistant Professor of History Hidetaka Hirota
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019061921X
Category:
Page: 312
View: 5088
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Expelling the Poor examines the origins of immigration restriction in the United States, especially deportation policy. Based on an analysis of immigration policies in major American coastal states, including New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Louisiana, and California, itprovides the first sustained study of immigration control conducted by states prior to the introduction of federal immigration law in the late nineteenth century. The influx of impoverished Irish immigrants over the first half of the nineteenth century led nativists in New York and Massachusetts todevelop policies for prohibiting the landing of destitute foreigners and deporting those already resident in the states to Europe, Canada, or other American states. No other coastal state engaged in immigration regulation with the same level of legislative effort and success as the two states. By locating the roots of American immigration control in cultural prejudice against the Irish and, more essentially, economic concerns about their poverty in nineteenth-century New York and Massachusetts, this book fundamentally revises the history of American immigration policy, which has largelyfocused on anti-Asian racism on the West Coast. By investigating state officials' practices of illegal removal, such as the overseas deportation of those who held American citizenship, this book reveals how the state-level treatment of destitute immigrants set precedents for the assertion byAmerican officers of unrestricted power against undesirable aliens, which characterized later federal control. Beginning with Irish migrants' initial departure from Ireland, the book traces their transatlantic passage to North America, the process of their expulsion from the United States, and theirpost-deportation lives in Europe. In doing so, it places American nativism in a transnational context, demonstrating how American deportation policy operated as part of a broader legal culture of excluding non-producing members from societies in the north Atlantic world.