In Our Image

America's Empire in the Philippines
Author: Stanley Karnow
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0307775437
Category: History
Page: 536
View: 7948
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Traces the history of the Philippines, discusses the influence of Spain and the United States, and looks at the problems facing the Philippines today.

Nation Building, State Building, and Economic Development: Case Studies and Comparisons

Case Studies and Comparisons
Author: Sarah C.M. Paine
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317464087
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 344
View: 3633
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Why do some countries remain poor and dysfunctional while others thrive and become affluent? The expert contributors to this volume seek to identify reasons why prosperity has increased rapidly in some countries but not others by constructing and comparing cases. The case studies focus on the processes of nation building, state building, and economic development in comparably situated countries over the past hundred years. Part I considers the colonial legacy of India, Algeria, the Philippines, and Manchuria. In Part II, the analysis shifts to the anticolonial development strategies of Soviet Russia, Ataturk's Turkey, Mao's China, and Nasser's Egypt. Part III is devoted to paired cases, in which ostensibly similar environments yielded very different outcomes: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; Jordan and Israel; the Republic of the Congo and neighboring Gabon; North Korea and South Korea; and, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. All the studies examine the combined constraints and opportunities facing policy makers, their policy objectives, and the effectiveness of their strategies. The concluding chapter distills what these cases can tell us about successful development - with findings that do not validate the conventional wisdom.

Empire and Education

A History of Greed and Goodwill from the War of 1898 to the War on Terror
Author: A. Angulo
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137024534
Category: Education
Page: 187
View: 7462
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This book is about education and American imperialism from the War of 1898 to the War on Terror. Very little coordinated or sustained research has been devoted to the broader contours of America, education, and empire. And third, this volume seeks to inspire new directions in the study of American educational history.

Dissenting Voices in America's Rise to Power


Author: David Mayers
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139463195
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2782
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This book offers a major rereading of US foreign policy from Thomas Jefferson's purchase of Louisiana expanse to the Korean War. This period of one hundred and fifty years saw the expansion of the United States from fragile republic to transcontinental giant. David Mayers explores the dissenting voices which accompanied this dramatic ascent, focusing on dissenters within the political and military establishment and on the recurrent patterns of dissent that have transcended particular policies and crises. The most stubborn of these sprang from anxiety over the material and political costs of empire while other strands of dissent have been rooted in ideas of exigent justice, realpolitik, and moral duties existing beyond borders. Such dissent is evident again in the contemporary world when the US occupies the position of preeminent global power. Professor Mayers's study reminds us that America's path to power was not as straightforward as it might now seem.

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit


Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 364110498X
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 4600
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Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.

Nonviolent Action

What Christian Ethics Demands but Most Christians Have Never Really Tried
Author: Ronald J. Sider
Publisher: Brazos Press
ISBN: 1441221719
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 8837
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There are numerous examples throughout history of effective nonviolent action. Nonviolent protesters defied the Soviet Empire's communist rulers, Gandhi's nonviolent revolution defeated the British Empire, and Martin Luther King Jr.'s peaceful civil-rights crusade changed American history. Recent scholarship shows that nonviolent revolutions against injustice and dictatorship are actually more successful than violent campaigns. In this book, noted theologian and bestselling author Ron Sider argues that the search for peaceful alternatives to violence is not only a practical necessity in the wake of the twentieth century--the most bloody in human history--but also a moral demand of the Christian faith. He presents compelling examples of how nonviolent action has been practiced in history and in current social-political situations to promote peace and oppose injustice, showing that this path is a successful and viable alternative to violence.

The Familiar Made Strange

American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn
Author: Brooke L. Blower,Mark Philip Bradley
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801455456
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 7856
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In The Familiar Made Strange, twelve distinguished historians offer original and playful readings of American icons and artifacts that cut across rather than stop at the nation’s borders to model new interpretive approaches to studying United States history. These leading practitioners of the “transnational turn” pause to consider such famous icons as John Singleton Copley’s painting Watson and the Shark, Albert Eisenstaedt’s photograph V-J Day, 1945, Times Square, and Alfred Kinsey’s reports on sexual behavior, as well as more surprising but revealing artifacts like Josephine Baker’s banana skirt and William Howard Taft’s underpants. Together, they present a road map to the varying scales, angles and methods of transnational analysis that shed light on American politics, empire, gender, and the operation of power in everyday life. Contributors: Brooke L. Blower, Boston University; Mark Philip Bradley, University of Chicago; Nick Cullather, Indiana University; Brian DeLay, University of California–Berkeley; Matthew Pratt Guterl, Brown University; Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor; Fredrik Logevall, Cornell University; Mary A. Renda, Mount Holyoke College; Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University; Andrew J. Rotter, Colgate University; Brian Rouleau, Texas A&M University; Naoko Shibusawa, Brown University

Specters of Mother India

The Global Restructuring of an Empire
Author: Mrinalini Sinha
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822387972
Category: History
Page: 386
View: 2012
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Specters of Mother India tells the complex story of one episode that became the tipping point for an important historical transformation. The event at the center of the book is the massive international controversy that followed the 1927 publication of Mother India, an exposé written by the American journalist Katherine Mayo. Mother India provided graphic details of a variety of social ills in India, especially those related to the status of women and to the particular plight of the country’s child wives. According to Mayo, the roots of the social problems she chronicled lay in an irredeemable Hindu culture that rendered India unfit for political self-government. Mother India was reprinted many times in the United States, Great Britain, and India; it was translated into more than a dozen languages; and it was reviewed in virtually every major publication on five continents. Sinha provides a rich historical narrative of the controversy surrounding Mother India, from the book’s publication through the passage in India of the Child Marriage Restraint Act in the closing months of 1929. She traces the unexpected trajectory of the controversy as critics acknowledged many of the book’s facts only to overturn its central premise. Where Mayo located blame for India’s social backwardness within the beliefs and practices of Hinduism, the critics laid it at the feet of the colonial state, which they charged with impeding necessary social reforms. As Sinha shows, the controversy became a catalyst for some far-reaching changes, including a reconfiguration of the relationship between the political and social spheres in colonial India and the coalescence of a collective identity for women.

The Columbia Guide to Asian American History


Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231505957
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 3064
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Offering a rich and insightful road map of Asian American history as it has evolved over more than 200 years, this book marks the first systematic attempt to take stock of this field of study. It examines, comments, and questions the changing assumptions and contexts underlying the experiences and contributions of an incredibly diverse population of Americans. Arriving and settling in this nation as early as the 1790s, with American-born generations stretching back more than a century, Asian Americans have become an integral part of the American experience; this cleverly organized book marks the trajectory of that journey, offering researchers invaluable information and interpretation. Part 1 offers a synoptic narrative history, a chronology, and a set of periodizations that reflect different ways of constructing the Asian American past. Part 2 presents lucid discussions of historical debates—such as interpreting the anti-Chinese movement of the late 1800s and the underlying causes of Japanese American internment during World War II—and such emerging themes as transnationalism and women and gender issues. Part 3 contains a historiographical essay and a wide-ranging compilation of book, film, and electronic resources for further study of core themes and groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hmong, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and others.

We Band of Angels

The Untold Story of the American Women Trapped on Bataan
Author: Elizabeth Norman
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0307799573
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 5413
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In the fall of 1941, the Philippines was a gardenia-scented paradise for the American Army and Navy nurses stationed there. War was a distant rumor, life a routine of easy shifts and dinners under the stars. On December 8 all that changed, as Japanese bombs began raining down on American bases in Luzon, and this paradise became a fiery hell. Caught in the raging battle, the nurses set up field hospitals in the jungles of Bataan and the tunnels of Corregidor, where they tended to the most devastating injuries of war, and suffered the terrors of shells and shrapnel. But the worst was yet to come. After Bataan and Corregidor fell, the nurses were herded into internment camps where they would endure three years of fear, brutality, and starvation. Once liberated, they returned to an America that at first celebrated them, but later refused to honor their leaders with the medals they clearly deserved. Here, in letters, diaries, and riveting firsthand accounts, is the story of what really happened during those dark days, woven together in a deeply affecting saga of women in war. Praise for We Band of Angels “Gripping . . . a war story in which the main characters never kill one of the enemy, or even shoot at him, but are nevertheless heroes . . . Americans today should thank God we had such women.”—Stephen E. Ambrose “Remarkable and uplifting.”—USA Today “[Elizabeth M. Norman] brings a quiet, scholarly voice to this narrative. . . . In just a little over six months these women had turned from plucky young girls on a mild adventure to authentic heroes. . . . Every page of this history is fascinating.”—Carolyn See, The Washington Post “Riveting . . . poignant and powerful.”—The Dallas Morning News Winner of the Lavinia Dock Award for historical scholarship, the American Academy of Nursing National Media Award, and the Agnes Dillon Randolph Award

New World Strategy

A Military Policy for America's Future
Author: Harry G. Summers
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780684812083
Category: History
Page: 270
View: 422
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Reviews American foreign policy, examining events in Bosnia, Haiti, and Rwanda, and recommends a new national role

Cinema, Transnationalism, and Colonial India

Entertaining the Raj
Author: Babli Sinha
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113676500X
Category: History
Page: 158
View: 4652
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Through the lens of cinema, this book explores the ways in which the United States, Britain and India impacted each other politically, culturally and ideologically. It argues that American films of the 1920s posited alternative notions of whiteness and the West to that of Britain, which stood for democracy and social mobility even at a time of virulent racism. The book examines the impact that the American cinema has on Indian filmmakers of the period, who were integrating its conventions with indigenous artistic traditions to articulate an Indian modernity. It considers the way American films in the 1920s presented an orientalist fantasy of Asia, which occluded the harsh realities of anti-Asian sentiment and legislation in the period as well as the exciting engagement of anti-imperial activists who sought to use the United States as the base of a transnational network. The book goes on to analyse the American ‘empire films’ of the 1930s, which adapted British narratives of empire to represent the United States as a new global paradigm. Presenting close readings of films, literature and art from the era, the book engages cinema studies with theories of post-colonialism and transnationalism, and provides a novel approach to the study of Indian cinema.

American Military Intervention in Unconventional War

From the Philippines to Iraq
Author: W. Bert
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230337813
Category: History
Page: 266
View: 5540
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A study of the major U.S. military interventions in unconventional war, this book looks at four wars that occurred while the U.S. was a superpower in the post-war WW II period and one in the Philippines in 1898.

Vietnam

A History
Author: Stanley Karnow
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 071265965X
Category: United States
Page: 768
View: 7851
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This monumental narrative clarifies, analyses and demystifies the terrible ordeal of the Vietnam war. Free of ideological bias, profound in its understanding and compassionate in its portrayal of humanity, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with the participants - French, American, Vietnamese, Chinese: diplomats, military commanders, high government officials, journalists, nurses, workers and soldiers. The Vietnam war was the most convulsive tragedy of recent times. This is its definitive history.

Twelve American Wars

Nine of Them Avoidable
Author: Eugene G. Windchy
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 1491730544
Category: History
Page: 446
View: 8130
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Eugene G. Windchy, author of Tonkin Gulf (“Superb investigative reporting”—NY Times), lays bare the tricks, errors, and secret plans that have taken the American people into avoidable wars. Our nation's greatest catastrophe was the Civil War, in which more than 620,000 people died. The war began when Southerners fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina. Windchy reports that the rebels had an opportunity to take the fort peacefully. Why did they open fire? We find out who made the final decision and why. World War I was a “war to make the world safe for democracy.” Instead, it gave birth to totalitarian Fascist and Communist regimes. World War II was a continuation of World War I, and that was followed by America's anti-Communist struggles in Korea and Vietnam. Today there are Communist countries with nuclear missiles aimed at American territory. We are still trying to cope with the effects of World War I, the greatest crime in modern history. How did the Great War begin? The history books tell us that it was sparked by an assassination. A young Serb shot an Austrian archduke, and Austria's retaliation on Serbia led to war between two great European alliances. Germany has received most of the blame for having promised to back up its Austrian ally. Twelve American Wars reveals that the archduke's assassination was a Serbian plot guided by Russian officials. The textbooks fail to mention that a month later there was another assassination. The silencing of a anti-war French politician covered up years of secret war planning by France and Russia. How did the United States get involved? One factor was the outrage provoked by the sinking of the huge passenger liner Lusitania, a British ship with Americans on board.Twelve American Wars presents overwhelming evidence that the British Admiralty, headed by Winston Churchill, deliberately put the Lusitania at risk, hoping to bring the United States into the war. Contrary to what we hear from Mexicans, the United States did not steal California from Mexico in the Mexican War of 1846 to 1848. Native Californians, called “Californios,” had expelled their last Mexican governor in 1845. Eugene Windchy's book is full of surprising facts. He believes that policy makers hoping to prevent war need to know the truth about our past wars, not just the politically acceptable stories in the textbooks.

How East Asians View Democracy


Author: Yun-han Chu,Larry Diamond,Andrew J. Nathan,Doh Chull Shin
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231517831
Category: Political Science
Page: 328
View: 8479
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East Asian democracies are in trouble, their legitimacy threatened by poor policy performance and undermined by nostalgia for the progrowth, soft-authoritarian regimes of the past. Yet citizens throughout the region value freedom, reject authoritarian alternatives, and believe in democracy. This book is the first to report the results of a large-scale survey-research project, the East Asian Barometer, in which eight research teams conducted national-sample surveys in five new democracies (Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Thailand, and Mongolia), one established democracy (Japan), and two nondemocracies (China and Hong Kong) in order to assess the prospects for democratic consolidation. The findings present a definitive account of the way in which East Asians understand their governments and their roles as citizens. Contributors use their expert local knowledge to analyze responses from a set of core questions, revealing both common patterns and national characteristics in citizens' views of democracy. They explore sources of divergence and convergence in attitudes within and across nations. The findings are sobering. Japanese citizens are disillusioned. The region's new democracies have yet to prove themselves, and citizens in authoritarian China assess their regime's democratic performance relatively favorably. The contributors to this volume contradict the claim that democratic governance is incompatible with East Asian cultures but counsel against complacency toward the fate of democracy in the region. While many forces affect democratic consolidation, popular attitudes are a crucial factor. This book shows how and why skepticism and frustration are the ruling sentiments among today's East Asians.

The Coldest Winter


Author: David Halberstam
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 0330540165
Category: History
Page: 736
View: 386
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Up until now, the Korean War has been the black hole of modern American history. The Coldest Winter changes that, giving readers a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. He charts the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu, and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides astonishingly vivid and nuanced portraits of all the major figures -- Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway. At the heart of the book are the individual stories of the soldiers on the front lines who were left to deal with the consequences of the dangerous misjudgments and competing agendas of powerful men. We meet them, follow them, and see some of the most dreadful battles in history through their eyes. As ever, Halberstam was concerned with the extraordinary courage and resolve of people asked to bear an extraordinary burden. Contemporary history in its most literary and luminescent form, The Coldest Winter provides crucial perspective on the Vietnam War and the events of today.

Conduct Under Fire

Four American Doctors and Their Fight for Life as Prisoners of the Japanese, 1941-1945
Author: John A. Glusman
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101117842
Category: History
Page: 608
View: 7194
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The fierce, bloody battles of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines are legendary in the annals of World War II. Those who survived faced the horrors of life as prisoners of the Japanese. In Conduct Under Fire, John A. Glusman chronicles these events through the eyes of his father, Murray, and three fellow navy doctors captured on Corregidor in May 1942. Here are the dramatic stories of the fall of Bataan, the siege of “the Rock,” and the daily struggles to tend the sick, wounded, and dying during some of the heaviest bombardments of World War II. Here also is the desperate war doctors and corpsmen waged against disease and starvation amid an enemy that viewed surrender as a disgrace. To survive, the POWs functioned as a family. But the ties that bind couldn’t protect them from a ruthless counteroffensive waged by American submarines or from the B-29 raids that burned Japan’s major cities to the ground. Based on extensive interviews with American, British, Australian, and Japanese veterans, as well as diaries, letters, and war crimes testimony, this is a harrowing account of a brutal clash of cultures, of a race war that escalated into total war. Like Flags of Our Fathers and Ghost Soldiers, Conduct Under Fire is a story of bravery on the battlefield and ingenuity behind barbed wire, one that reveals the long shadow the war cast on the lives of those who fought it.

The contested state

American foreign policy and regime change in the Philippines
Author: Amy Blitz
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780847699353
Category: Political Science
Page: 237
View: 9315
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From a scholar's first-hand account of the fall of Marcos comes The Contested State, an inquiry into the international causes and consequences of civil war, the different types of regimes that emerge from such conflict, and the implications for American foreign policy. Tracing the battle for control of the Philippines back to the Spanish era, The Contested State presents a historical, transnational picture of regime change, offering insights into the broader transnational issues that are increasingly important in an ever more globalized world.