Labor and Legality

An Ethnography of a Mexican Immigrant Network
Author: Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199739387
Category: Social Science
Page: 164
View: 4866
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Winner of the 2011 ALLA Book Award honorable mention! Labor and Legality: An Ethnography of a Mexican Immigrant Network is an ethnography of undocumented immigrants who work as busboys at a Chicago-area restaurant. Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz introduces readers to the Lions, ten friends from Mexico committed to improving their fortunes and the lives of their families. Set in and around "Il Vino," a restaurant that could stand in for many places that employ undocumented workers, Labor and Legality reveals the faces behind the war being waged over "illegal aliens" in America. Gomberg-Muñoz focuses on how undocumented workers develop a wide range of social strategies to cultivate financial security, nurture emotional well-being, and promote their dignity and self-esteem. She also reviews the political and historical circumstances of undocumented migration, with an emphasis on post-1970 socioeconomic and political conditions in the United States and Mexico. Labor and Legality is one of several volumes in the Issues of Globalization: Case Studies in Contemporary Anthropology series, which examines the experiences of individual communities in our contemporary world. Each volume offers a brief and engaging exploration of a particular issue arising from globalization and its cultural, political, and economic effects on certain peoples or groups. Ideal for introductory anthropology courses-and as supplements for a variety of upper-level courses-these texts seamlessly combine portraits of an interconnected and globalized world with narratives that emphasize the agency of their subjects.

Beamtimes and Lifetimes


Author: Sharon Traweek
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674044444
Category: Social Science
Page: 203
View: 8374
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Cuban Color in Tourism and la Lucha

An Ethnography of Racial Meanings
Author: Lorecia Kaifa Roland
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199739660
Category: Social Science
Page: 130
View: 7940
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Cuban Color in Tourism and La Lucha: An Ethnography of Racial Meanings offers a provocative look at what it means to belong in modern socialist Cuba. Drawn from her extensive travels throughout Cuba over the past decade, author L. Kaifa Roland pulls back the curtain on a country that has remained mysterious to Americans since the mid-twentieth century. Through vivid vignettes and firsthand details, Roland exposes the lasting effects of the collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent rise of state-sponsored segregated tourism in Cuba. She demonstrates how the creation of separate spheres for locals and tourists has had two effects. First, tourism reestablished the racial apartheid that plagued pre-revolutionary Cuba. Second, it reinforced how the state's desire to maintain a socialist ideology in face of its increasing reliance on capitalist tools is at odds with the day-to-day struggles--or La Lucha--of the Cuban people. Roland uses conversations and anecdotes gleaned from a year of living among locals as a way of delving into these struggles and understanding what constitutes life in Cuba today. In exploring the intersections of race, class, and gender, she gives readers a better understanding of the common issues of status and belonging for tourists and their hosts in Cuba. Cuban Color in Tourism and La Lucha is one of several volumes in the Issues of Globalization: Case Studies in Contemporary Anthropology series, which examines the experiences of individual communities in our contemporary world. Each volume offers a brief and engaging exploration of a particular issue arising from globalization and its cultural, political, and economic effects on certain peoples or groups. Ideal for introductory anthropology courses--and as supplements for a variety of upper-level courses--these texts seamlessly combine portraits of an interconnected and globalized world with narratives that emphasize the agency of their subjects.

Brokered Homeland

Japanese Brazilian Migrants in Japan
Author: Joshua Hotaka Roth
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801488085
Category: History
Page: 161
View: 9203
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Faced with an aging workforce, Japanese firms are hiring foreign workers in ever-increasing numbers. In 1990 Japan's government began encouraging the migration of Nikkeijin (overseas Japanese) who are presumed to assimilate more easily than are foreign nationals without a Japanese connection. More than 250,000 Nikkeijin, mainly from Brazil, now work in Japan. The interactions between Nikkeijin and natives, says Joshua Hotaka Roth, play a significant role in the emergence of an increasingly multicultural Japan. He uses the experiences of Japanese Brazilians in Japan to illuminate the racial, cultural, linguistic, and other criteria groups use to distinguish themselves from one another. Roth's analysis is enriched by on-site observations at festivals, in factories, and in community centers, as well as by interviews with workers, managers, employment brokers, and government officials.Considered both "essentially Japanese" and "foreign," nikkeijin benefit from preferential immigration policy, yet face economic and political strictures that marginalize them socially and deny them membership in local communities. Although the literature on immigration tends to blame native blue-collar workers for tense relations with migrants, Roth makes a compelling case for a more complex definition of the relationships among class, nativism, and foreign labor. Brokered Homeland is enlivened by Roth's own experience: in Japan, he came to think of himself as nikkeijin, rather than as Japanese-American.

Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives


Author: Catherine Lutz,Anne Lutz Fernandez
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 0230102190
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 9389
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Carjacked is an in-depth look at our obsession with cars. While the automobile's contribution to global warming and the effects of volatile gas prices are is widely known, the problems we face every day because of our cars are much more widespread and yet much less known -- from the surprising $14,000 per year that the average family pays each year for the vehicles it owns, to the increase in rates of obesity and asthma to which cars contribute, to the 40,000 deaths and 2.5 million crash injuries each and every year. Carjacked details the complex impact of the automobile on modern society and shows us how to develop a healthier, cheaper, and greener relationship with cars.

Asking and Listening

Ethnography as Personal Adaptation
Author: Paul Bohannan,Dirk van der Elst
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478608048
Category: Social Science
Page: 107
View: 2934
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Giving students the capacity to include ethnography in their own experience! Asking and Listening is the first book to trace the changing ways in which human beings have learned to look at the Others Beyond the Gate with their strange languages and stranger customs. Not a history of ethnography so much as a chronicle of its uses and potentials, Asking and Listening examines the premises of ethnography and concerns itself with a wide range of issues such as ethnocentrism and the morass of cultural relativism, the cultures of corporations, and the meaning of ethnography for government policy. It ends with an examination of the problems in charting our tomorrows: ethnography in the information age, and for the future. Through its pragmatic analysis of cultures as storehouses of alternatives in the way universal problems can and have been approached, Asking and Listening offers students not merely the opportunity to make sense of descriptions of other peoples lifeways, but makes such ethnographic knowledge immediately useful in their own lives, choices, and career plans.

Anthropology

What Does it Mean to be Human?
Author: Robert H. Lavenda,Emily Ann Schultz
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195189766
Category: Social Science
Page: 540
View: 5871
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A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, Anthropology: What Does It Mean to Be Human? takes a question-oriented approach that illuminates major concepts for students. Structuring each chapter around an important question, the authors explore what it means to be human, incorporating answers from all four subfields of anthropology--cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology--and offering a more balanced perspective than other texts. They address central issues of the discipline, highlighting the controversies and commitments that are shaping contemporary anthropology. FEATURES: * Covers the material in fifteen concise chapters--an ideal text for a one-semester course * Addresses issues of power and inequality in the contemporary world--including racism, ethnic discrimination, nationalism, caste, and class * Incorporates cutting-edge theory and gender and feminist anthropology throughout * Takes an explicitly global approach, discussing ways in which the spread of capitalism has drastically reshaped how people everywhere live their lives * Presents new voices and alternative perspectives from nonanthropologists and indigenous peoples through "In Their Own Words" commentaries * Provides ethnographic summaries--with maps--of each society discussed at length in the text in "EthnoProfile" boxes * Integrates additional helpful pedagogical aids including key terms, a running glossary, chapter summaries, maps, and annotated suggestions for further reading * Supplemented by an Instructor's Manual and Computerized Test Bank Course Management Systems are available from your Oxford representative.

Shadowed Lives: Undocumented Immigrants in American Society


Author: Leo R. Chavez
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285402502
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 4676
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One of the few case studies of undocumented immigrants available, this insightful anthropological analysis humanizes a group of people too often reduced to statistics and stereotypes. The hardships of Hispanic migration are conveyed in the immigrants' own voices while the author's voice raises questions about power, stereotypes, settlement, and incorporation into American society. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Becoming Legal

Immigration Law and Mixed Status Families
Author: Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780190276010
Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE
Page: 208
View: 3804
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"An ethnographic study of immigration and mixed-status families"--

Scratching Out a Living

Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South
Author: Angela Stuesse
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520287215
Category: Social Science
Page: 312
View: 6004
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"What does globalization look like in the rural South? Scratching Out a Living takes readers deep into Mississippi's chicken processing communities and workplaces, where large numbers of Latin American migrants began arriving in the mid-1990s to labor alongside an established African American workforce in some of the most dangerous and lowest paid jobs in the country. Based on six years of collaboration with a local workers' center, activist anthropologist Angela Stuesse explores how Black, white, and new Latino residents have experienced and understood these transformations. Illuminating connections between the area's long history of racial inequality, the poultry industry's growth, immigrants' contested place in contemporary social relations, and workers' prospects for political mobilization, Scratching Out a Living calls for organizing strategies that bring diverse working communities together in mutual construction of a more just future"--Provided by publisher.

Working the Boundaries

Race, Space, and “Illegality” in Mexican Chicago
Author: Nicholas De Genova
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822387093
Category: Social Science
Page: 348
View: 9807
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While Chicago has the second-largest Mexican population among U.S. cities, relatively little ethnographic attention has focused on its Mexican community. This much-needed ethnography of Mexicans living and working in Chicago examines processes of racialization, labor subordination, and class formation; the politics of nativism; and the structures of citizenship and immigration law. Nicholas De Genova develops a theory of “Mexican Chicago” as a transnational social and geographic space that joins Chicago to innumerable communities throughout Mexico. “Mexican Chicago” is a powerful analytical tool, a challenge to the way that social scientists have thought about immigration and pluralism in the United States, and the basis for a wide-ranging critique of U.S. notions of race, national identity, and citizenship. De Genova worked for two and a half years as a teacher of English in ten industrial workplaces (primarily metal-fabricating factories) throughout Chicago and its suburbs. In Working the Boundaries he draws on fieldwork conducted in these factories, in community centers, and in the homes and neighborhoods of Mexican migrants. He describes how the meaning of “Mexican” is refigured and racialized in relation to a U.S. social order dominated by a black-white binary. Delving into immigration law, he contends that immigration policies have worked over time to produce Mexicans as the U.S. nation-state’s iconic “illegal aliens.” He explains how the constant threat of deportation is used to keep Mexican workers in line. Working the Boundaries is a major contribution to theories of race and transnationalism and a scathing indictment of U.S. labor and citizenship policies.

My Father's Wars

Migration, Memory, and the Violence of a Century
Author: Alisse Waterston
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135127077
Category: Social Science
Page: 198
View: 3033
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* Winner: International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Outstanding Book Award 2016 * My Father’s Wars is an anthropologist's vivid account of her father's journey across continents, countries, cultures, generations, and wars. It is a daughter's moving portrait of a charming, funny, wounded and difficult man. And it is a scholar's reflection on the dramatic forces of history, the experience of exile and immigration, the legacies of culture, and the enduring power of memory. This book is for Anthropology and Sociology courses in qualitative methods, ethnography, violence, migration, and ethnicity.

Birth on the Threshold

Childbirth and Modernity in South India
Author: Cecilia Van Hollen
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 052093539X
Category: Social Science
Page: 310
View: 1265
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Even childbirth is affected by globalization—and in India, as elsewhere, the trend is away from home births, assisted by midwives, toward hospital births with increasing reliance on new technologies. And yet, as this work of critical feminist ethnography clearly demonstrates, the global spread of biomedical models of childbirth has not brought forth one monolithic form of "modern birth." Focusing on the birth experiences of lower-class women in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Birth on the Threshold reveals the complex and unique ways in which modernity emerges in local contexts. Through vivid description and animated dialogue, this book conveys the birth stories of the women of Tamil Nadu in their own voices, emphasizing their critiques of and aspirations for modern births today. In light of these stories, author Cecilia Van Hollen explores larger questions about how the structures of colonialism and postcolonial international and national development have helped to shape the form and meaning of birth for Indian women today. Ultimately, her book poses the question: How is gender—especially maternity—reconfigured as birth is transformed?

A Courtship After Marriage

Sexuality and Love in Mexican Transnational Families
Author: Jennifer S. Hirsch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520228715
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 376
View: 8580
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Since 1960 the fertility rate in Mexico has dropped to about 2.6 children per woman. Such changes are part of a transformation explored in this ethnographic study of generational and migration-related redefinitions of gender, marriage and sexuality in rural Mexico and among Mexicans in Atlanta.

The Making of a Modern Kingdom

Globalization and Change in Saudi Arabia
Author: Ann T. Jordan
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478609168
Category: Social Science
Page: 186
View: 2920
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This timely and relevant case study presents an unparalleled anthropological overview of Saudi Arabia, a nation-state of prime importance, while it builds a vital understanding of globalizationthe connectedness of the world. In its beautifully written pages, Jordan describes how a country with no modern education system and no modern technology or infrastructure developed all of these and became a first-rate world player in economics, education, and medicine in just a few short decades. After situating the work in current anthropological theory, Jordan presents a summary of the unique geography, history, and traditional cultures of the Arabian Peninsula. From there readers land in a world of traffic jams, skyscrapers, and marble shopping malls. They learn the steps of the modernization process, its effects on peoples lives, and the reasons for its success through examples from education, the oil industry, and a mini case study of a hospital. This fast-moving, eye-opening account casts a wide net. It includes multifaceted discussions of international politics and political organization, the position of women and the role of religion, the global importance of the oil industry, and the impact of the 9/11 tragedy on the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In addition to introductory cultural anthropology and Middle East survey courses, The Making of a Modern Kingdom serves as an ideal casebook with modern applicability in political and economic anthropology courses.

Body of Victim, Body of Warrior

Refugee Families and the Making of Kashmiri Jihadists
Author: Cabeiri deBergh Robinson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520954548
Category: Social Science
Page: 342
View: 8485
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This book provides a fascinating look at the creation of contemporary Muslim jihadists. Basing the book on her long-term fieldwork in the disputed borderlands between Pakistan and India, Cabeiri deBergh Robinson tells the stories of people whose lives and families have been shaped by a long history of political conflict. Interweaving historical and ethnographic evidence, Robinson explains how refuge-seeking has become a socially and politically debased practice in the Kashmir region and why this devaluation has turned refugee men into potential militants. She reveals the fraught social processes by which individuals and families produce and maintain a modern jihad, and she shows how Muslim refugees have forged an Islamic notion of rights—a hybrid of global political ideals that adopts the language of human rights and humanitarianism as a means to rethink refugees’ positions in transnational communities. Jihad is no longer seen as a collective fight for the sovereignty of the Islamic polity, but instead as a personal struggle to establish the security of Muslim bodies against political violence, torture, and rape. Robinson describes how this new understanding has contributed to the popularization of jihad in the Kashmir region, decentered religious institutions as regulators of jihad in practice, and turned the families of refugee youths into the ultimate mediators of entrance into militant organizations. This provocative book challenges the idea that extremism in modern Muslim societies is the natural by-product of a clash of civilizations, of a universal Islamist ideology, or of fundamentalist conversion.

Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean


Author: Harry Sanabria
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317350235
Category: Social Science
Page: 448
View: 1888
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The first single-authored comprehensive introduction to major contemporary research trends, issues, and debates on the anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. The text provides wide and historically informed coverage of key facets of Latin American and Caribbean societies and their cultural and historical development as well as the roles of power and inequality. Cymeme Howe, Visiting Assistant Professor of Cornell University writes, “The text moves well and builds over time, paying close attention to balancing both the Caribbean and Latin America as geographic regions, Spanish and non-Spanish speaking countries, and historical and contemporary issues in the field. I found the geographic breadth to be especially impressive.” Jeffrey W. Mantz of California State University, Stanislaus, notes that the contents “reflect the insights of an anthropologist who knows Latin America intimately and extensively.”

How to Think Like an Anthropologist


Author: Matthew Engelke
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400889529
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
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From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.

The broken village

coffee, migration, and globalization in Honduras
Author: Daniel R. Reichman
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801463084
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 8760
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In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United States. The small village-called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada-was once home to a thriving coffee economy. Recently, it has become dependent on migrants working in distant places like Long Island and South Dakota, who live in ways that most Honduran townspeople struggle to comprehend or explain. Reichman explores how the new "migration economy" has upended cultural ideas of success and failure, family dynamics, and local politics. During his time in La Quebrada, Reichman focused on three different strategies for social reform-a fledgling coffee cooperative that sought to raise farmer incomes and establish principles of fairness and justice through consumer activism; religious campaigns for personal morality that were intended to counter the corrosive effects of migration; and local discourses about migrant "greed" that labeled migrants as the cause of social crisis, rather than its victims. All three phenomena had one common trait: They were settings in which people presented moral visions of social welfare in response to a perceived moment of crisis. The Broken Village integrates sacred and secular ideas of morality, legal and cultural notions of justice, to explore how different groups define social progress.

Life Interrupted

Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States
Author: Denise Brennan
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822376911
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 1123
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DIVLife Interrupted introduces us to survivors of human trafficking who are struggling to get by and make homes for themselves in the United States. Having spent nearly a decade following the lives of formerly trafficked men and women, Denise Brennan recounts in close detail their flight from their abusers and their courageous efforts to rebuild their lives. At once scholarly and accessible, her book links these firsthand accounts to global economic inequities and under-regulated and unprotected workplaces that routinely exploit migrant laborers in the United States. Brennan contends that today's punitive immigration policies undermine efforts to fight trafficking. While many believe trafficking happens only in the sex trade, Brennan shows that across low-wage labor sectors—in fields, in factories, and on construction sites—widespread exploitation can lead to and conceal forced labor. Life Interrupted is a riveting account of life in and after trafficking and a forceful call for meaningful immigration and labor reform. All royalties from this book will be donated to the nonprofit Survivor Leadership Training Fund administered through the Freedom Network.