Midnight in Broad Daylight

A Japanese American Family Caught Between Two Worlds
Author: Pamela Rotner Sakamoto
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062351958
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 1445
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Meticulously researched and beautifully written, the true story of a Japanese American family that found itself on opposite sides during World War II—an epic tale of family, separation, divided loyalties, love, reconciliation, loss, and redemption—this is a riveting chronicle of U.S.–Japan relations and the Japanese experience in America. After their father’s death, Harry, Frank, and Pierce Fukuhara—all born and raised in the Pacific Northwest—moved to Hiroshima, their mother’s ancestral home. Eager to go back to America, Harry returned in the late 1930s. Then came Pearl Harbor. Harry was sent to an internment camp until a call came for Japanese translators and he dutifully volunteered to serve his country. Back in Hiroshima, his brothers Frank and Pierce became soldiers in the Japanese Imperial Army. As the war raged on, Harry, one of the finest bilingual interpreters in the United States Army, island-hopped across the Pacific, moving ever closer to the enemy—and to his younger brothers. But before the Fukuharas would have to face each other in battle, the U.S. detonated the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, gravely injuring tens of thousands of civilians, including members of their family. Alternating between the American and Japanese perspectives, Midnight in Broad Daylight captures the uncertainty and intensity of those charged with the fighting as well as the deteriorating home front of Hiroshima—as never told before in English—and provides a fresh look at the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Intimate and evocative, it is an indelible portrait of a resilient family, a scathing examination of racism and xenophobia, an homage to the tremendous Japanese American contribution to the American war effort, and an invaluable addition to the historical record of this extraordinary time.

Midnight in Broad Daylight

A Japanese American Family Caught Between Two Worlds
Author: Pamela Rotner Sakamoto
Publisher: Harper
ISBN: 9780062351937
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 599
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"'Meticulously researched and beautifully written, the true story of a Japanese American family that found itself on opposite sides during World War II--an epic tale of family, separation, divided loyalties, love, reconciliation, loss, and redemption this is a riveting chronicle of U.S.-Japan relations and the Japanese experience in America. After their father's death, Harry, Frank, and Pierce Fukuhara--all born and raised in the Pacific Northwest--moved to Hiroshima, their mother's ancestral home. Eager to go back to America, Harry returned in the late 1930s. Then came Pearl Harbor. Harry was sent to an internment camp until a call came for Japanese translators and he dutifully volunteered to serve his country. Back in Hiroshima, his brothers Frank and Pierce became soldiers in the Japanese Imperial Army. As the war raged on, Harry, one of the finest bilingual interpreters in the United States Army, island-hopped across the Pacific, moving ever closer to the enemy--and to his younger brothers. But before the Fukuharas would have to face each other in battle, the U.S. detonated the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, gravely injuring tens of thousands of civilians, including members of their family. Alternating between the American and Japanese perspectives, Midnight in Broad Daylight captures the uncertainty and intensity of those charged with the fighting as well as the deteriorating home front of Hiroshima--as never seen before in English--and provides a fresh look at the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Intimate and evocative, it is an indelible portrait of a resilient family, a scathing examination of racism and xenophobia, an homage to the tremendous Japanese American contribution to the American war effort, and an invaluable addition to the historical record of this extraordinary time; ''Mother, I am Katsuharu. I have come home.' By the time the reader arrives at this simple, Odysseus-like declaration, she will have been tossed and transported through one of the most wrenching, inspirational--and until now unknown--true epics of World War II. Pamela Rotner Sakamoto, in her luminous, magisterial re-assembling of the lives of two Japanese brothers who found themselves on opposite sides of the great conflict, has helped shape and set the standard for a vital and necessary new genre: trans-Pacific literature. Her readers will want more'--Ron Powers, Pulitzer Prize Winner and author of Mark Twain : A Life"--From Edelweis.com.

Japanese Diplomats and Jewish Refugees

A World War II Dilemma
Author: Pamela Rotner Sakamoto
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN: 9780275961992
Category: History
Page: 188
View: 4863
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In the late 1930s and early 1940s, European Jews traveled east to seek refuge in the West. Three thousand refugees transited Japan and China, and more than 21,000 spent the war in Japanese-occupied Shanghai. This study examines the cable traffic between Japanese diplomats and the ministry headquarte

Before Internment

Essays in Prewar Japanese American History
Author: Yuji Ichioka,Gordon H. Chang,Eiichiro Azuma
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804751476
Category: History
Page: 360
View: 6193
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This book is an anthology of essays by Yuji Ichioka, the foremost authority on Japanese American history, which studies Japanese American life and politics in the interwar years.

Infamy

The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II
Author: Richard Reeves
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 0805099395
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 737
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A LOS ANGELES TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITOR'S CHOICE • Bestselling author Richard Reeves provides an authoritative account of the internment of more than 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese aliens during World War II Less than three months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and inflamed the nation, President Roosevelt signed an executive order declaring parts of four western states to be a war zone operating under military rule. The U.S. Army immediately began rounding up thousands of Japanese-Americans, sometimes giving them less than 24 hours to vacate their houses and farms. For the rest of the war, these victims of war hysteria were imprisoned in primitive camps. In Infamy, the story of this appalling chapter in American history is told more powerfully than ever before. Acclaimed historian Richard Reeves has interviewed survivors, read numerous private letters and memoirs, and combed through archives to deliver a sweeping narrative of this atrocity. Men we usually consider heroes-FDR, Earl Warren, Edward R. Murrow-were in this case villains, but we also learn of many Americans who took great risks to defend the rights of the internees. Most especially, we hear the poignant stories of those who spent years in "war relocation camps," many of whom suffered this terrible injustice with remarkable grace. Racism, greed, xenophobia, and a thirst for revenge: a dark strand in the American character underlies this story of one of the most shameful episodes in our history. But by recovering the past, Infamy has given voice to those who ultimately helped the nation better understand the true meaning of patriotism.

Daughters of the Samurai: A Journey from East to West and Back


Author: Janice P. Nimura
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393248240
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 9287
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"Nimura paints history in cinematic strokes and brings a forgotten story to vivid, unforgettable life." —Arthur Golden, author of Memoirs of a Geisha In 1871, five young girls were sent by the Japanese government to the United States. Their mission: learn Western ways and return to help nurture a new generation of enlightened men to lead Japan. Raised in traditional samurai households during the turmoil of civil war, three of these unusual ambassadors—Sutematsu Yamakawa, Shige Nagai, and Ume Tsuda—grew up as typical American schoolgirls. Upon their arrival in San Francisco they became celebrities, their travels and traditional clothing exclaimed over by newspapers across the nation. As they learned English and Western customs, their American friends grew to love them for their high spirits and intellectual brilliance. The passionate relationships they formed reveal an intimate world of cross-cultural fascination and connection. Ten years later, they returned to Japan—a land grown foreign to them—determined to revolutionize women’s education. Based on in-depth archival research in Japan and in the United States, including decades of letters from between the three women and their American host families, Daughters of the Samurai is beautifully, cinematically written, a fascinating lens through which to view an extraordinary historical moment.

Love Letter


Author: Stephen E. Price
Publisher: WestBow Press
ISBN: 1490826149
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 262
View: 2994
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Love Letter for a Japanese War Bride is Stephen E. Price's memoir of his eternal love for his first wife, Ryuko. Set primarily in postwar Japan, the story provides a window into a new world one that spawned cultural diversity, but one that was largely unprepared for and unaccepting of it. The tale chronicles the lover's perseverance as they struggle with both the US and Japanese governments to gain permission to marry. The narrative is woven into fabrics of cultures, traditions, attitudes, language and history some of which may be unfamiliar, but all of which is captivating. Above all, the unending and redemptive romance in this story captures the purest essence of love with all its twists and turns, joys and sorrows, highs and lows, and culminates in a tragic yet transcendent ending. "A remarkable memoir and love letter' that rings true on every page An intimate and heartbreaking story, beautifully told. I can think of no other work about Japan and America that reveals more poignantly how love and trust can bridge race and culture, even where the odds seem so formidably against this." John W. Dower, Ford International Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Pulitzer Prize winning author of Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II.

Desert Exile

The Uprooting of a Japanese American Family
Author: Yoshiko Uchida
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295806532
Category: Social Science
Page: 184
View: 6661
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After the attack on Pearl Harbor, everything changed for Yoshiko Uchida. Desert Exile is her autobiographical account of life before and during World War II. The book does more than relate the day-to-day experience of living in stalls at the Tanforan Racetrack, the assembly center just south of San Francisco, and in the Topaz, Utah, internment camp. It tells the story of the courage and strength displayed by those who were interned. Replaces ISBN 9780295961903

The Train to Crystal City

FDR's Secret Prisoner Exchange Program and America's Only Family Internment Camp During World War II
Author: Jan Jarboe Russell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451693680
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 2771
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The New York Times bestselling dramatic and never-before-told story of a secret FDR-approved American internment camp in Texas during World War II: “A must-read….The Train to Crystal City is compelling, thought-provoking, and impossible to put down” (Star-Tribune, Minneapolis). During World War II, trains delivered thousands of civilians from the United States and Latin America to Crystal City, Texas. The trains carried Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and their American-born children. The only family internment camp during the war, Crystal City was the center of a government prisoner exchange program called “quiet passage.” Hundreds of prisoners in Crystal City were exchanged for other more ostensibly important Americans—diplomats, businessmen, soldiers, and missionaries—behind enemy lines in Japan and Germany. “In this quietly moving book” (The Boston Globe), Jan Jarboe Russell focuses on two American-born teenage girls, uncovering the details of their years spent in the camp; the struggles of their fathers; their families’ subsequent journeys to war-devastated Germany and Japan; and their years-long attempt to survive and return to the United States, transformed from incarcerated enemies to American loyalists. Their stories of day-to-day life at the camp, from the ten-foot high security fence to the armed guards, daily roll call, and censored mail, have never been told. Combining big-picture World War II history with a little-known event in American history, The Train to Crystal City reveals the war-time hysteria against the Japanese and Germans in America, the secrets of FDR’s tactics to rescue high-profile POWs in Germany and Japan, and above all, “is about identity, allegiance, and home, and the difficulty of determining the loyalties that lie in individual human hearts” (Texas Observer).

Japanese Roses

A Novel of the Japanese American Internment
Author: Theresa Lorella
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781484849798
Category: Fiction
Page: 290
View: 3856
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December 7, 1941: The Miramoto family's second generation is torn apart, separated in the United States and Japan. After Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, their lives would change forever. Kimiko Miramoto must find a way to survive alone in Japan, the enemy's country, without being a traitor to her own. In America, Maggie, Akio, and Akio's Caucasian wife, Rose Marie, are labeled enemies of the United States. Taken from their homes, imprisoned, and separated in different internment camps, their hopes, dreams, and loyalty to their beloved country are put to the ultimate test. Japanese Roses tells the story of one Japanese-American family's incredible struggle to survive, caught in the tides of World War II and conflicted by national loyalty, forced to endure unspeakable betrayal and injustice. Spanning the years of the war for the Pacific, Japanese Roses tells the story not only of one family, but of the struggles of all Japanese Americans during a time when they were labeled the enemy both in their own country and the country of their parents. Alternating between the eyes of Maggie, Rose Marie, and Kimiko, the story moves from the streets of Seattle as the bombs are dropped in Pearl Harbor, to the prison camps that lined America's West Coast, to the devastation of Hiroshima as the war drew to a close. While all three women are separated by the war, they share one goal: They want to go home. But will their homes even exist in the aftermath of the of the war? And will they all reach that place once the last bombs are dropped?

Inside America's Concentration Camps

Two Centuries of Internment and Torture
Author: James L. Dickerson
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1569767483
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 5580
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Exploring the history and tragedy of concentration camps that were built, staged, and filled with adults and children under the orders of the U.S. government, this vivid narrative brings the stories of victims and flaws of American government to life. Beginning in the 1830s with the imprisonment of Native Americans, this investigation details the camps that reappeared during World War II with the round-up of Japanese Americans, German Americans, Italian Americans, and Jews fleeing Nazi Germany, as well as more recently during the Bush administration with the construction of new concentration camps in Cuba. The moving personal experiences of those imprisoned in the camps, including accounts of how the U.S. government removed children of Japanese ancestry from orphanages only to replace them in camps, are revealed within this eye-opening history. Both heartbreaking and inspirational, this authoritative record of survival suggests a call to action for those who read it.

Looking Like the Enemy

My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps
Author: Mary Matusda Gruenewald,Maureen R. Michelson
Publisher: Newsage Press
ISBN: 9780939165582
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 253
View: 5990
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Mary Matsuda is a typical 16-year-old girl living on Vashon Island, Washington with her family. On December 7, 1942, the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor, and Mary's life changes forever. Mary and her brother, Yoneichi, are U.S. citizens, but they are imprisoned, along with their parents, in a Japanese-American internment camp. Mary endures an indefinite sentence behind barbed wire in crowded, primitive camps, struggling for survival and dignity. Mary wonders if they will be killed, or if they will one day return to their beloved home and berry farm. The author tells her story with the passion and spirit of a girl trying to make sense of this terrible injustice to her and her family. Mary captures the emotional and psychological essence of what it was like to grow up in the midst of this profound dislocation, questioning her Japanese and her American heritage. Few other books on this subject come close to the emotional power, raw honesty, and moral significance of this memoir. This personal story provides a touchstone for the young student learning about World War II and this difficult chapter in U.S. history.

The Japanese Internment Camps

A History Perspectives Book
Author: Rachel A. Bailey
Publisher: Cherry Lake
ISBN: 1624317200
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 32
View: 5258
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This book relays the factual details of the Japanese internment camps in the United States during World War II. The narrative provides multiple accounts of the event, and readers learn details through the point of view of a child at an internment camp, a Japanese-American soldier, and a worker at the Manzanar War Relocation Center. The text offers opportunities to compare and contrast various perspectives in the text while gathering and analyzing information about a historical event.

A Daughter of the Samurai


Author: Etsu Inagaki Sugimoto
Publisher: Olympia Press
ISBN: 1608726509
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 314
View: 2660
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Born into a high-ranking samurai family at the onset of the Meiji period, Etsu Sugimoto's own life mirrored the radical shifts her country faced. Originally destined to be a priestess, she instead became the arranged bride of a Japanese merchant in Cincinnati, later returning to Japan with her daughters as the nation modernized swiftly.

Unbroken

A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
Author: Laura Hillenbrand
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0812974492
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 500
View: 9655
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Relates the story of a U.S. airman who survived when his bomber crashed into the sea during World War II, spent forty-seven days adrift in the ocean before being rescued by the Japanese Navy, and was held as a prisoner until the end of the war.

Only what We Could Carry

The Japanese American Internment Experience
Author: Lawson Fusao Inada
Publisher: Heyday
ISBN: 9781890771300
Category: History
Page: 439
View: 8123
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Personal documents, art, propoganda, and stories express the Japanese American experience in internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Eve of a Hundred Midnights

The Star-Crossed Love Story of Two WWII Correspondents and Their Epic Escape Across the Pacific
Author: Bill Lascher
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062375229
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 2629
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The unforgettable true story of two married journalists on an island-hopping run for their lives across the Pacific after the Fall of Manila during World War II—a saga of love, adventure, and danger. On New Year’s Eve, 1941, just three weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese were bombing the Philippine capital of Manila, where journalists Mel and Annalee Jacoby had married just a month earlier. The couple had worked in China as members of a tight community of foreign correspondents with close ties to Chinese leaders; if captured by invading Japanese troops, they were certain to be executed. Racing to the docks just before midnight, they barely escaped on a freighter—the beginning of a tumultuous journey that would take them from one island outpost to another. While keeping ahead of the approaching Japanese, Mel and Annalee covered the harrowing war in the Pacific Theater—two of only a handful of valiant and dedicated journalists reporting from the region. Supported by deep historical research, extensive interviews, and the Jacobys’ personal letters, Bill Lascher recreates the Jacobys’ thrilling odyssey and their love affair with the Far East and one another. Bringing to light their compelling personal stories and their professional life together, Eve of a Hundred Midnights is a tale of an unquenchable thirst for adventure, of daring reportage at great personal risk, and of an enduring romance that blossomed in the shadow of war.

The Boys in the Bunkhouse

Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland
Author: Dan Barry
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062372157
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 3326
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With this Dickensian tale from America’s heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives. In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom. Drawing on exhaustive interviews, Dan Barry dives deeply into the lives of the men, recording their memories of suffering, loneliness and fleeting joy, as well as the undying hope they maintained despite their traumatic circumstances. Barry explores how a small Iowa town remained oblivious to the plight of these men, analyzes the many causes for such profound and chronic negligence, and lays out the impact of the men’s dramatic court case, which has spurred advocates—including President Obama—to push for just pay and improved working conditions for people living with disabilities. A luminous work of social justice, told with compassion and compelling detail, The Boys in the Bunkhouse is more than just inspired storytelling. It is a clarion call for a vigilance that ensures inclusion and dignity for all.

The Children of Willesden Lane

A True Story of Hope and Survival During World War II (Young Readers Edition)
Author: Mona Golabek,Lee Cohen
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 0316554871
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 224
View: 8864
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Fourteen-year-old Lisa Jura was a musical prodigy who hoped to become a concert pianist. But when Hitler's armies advanced on pre-war Vienna, Lisa's parents were forced to make a difficult decision. Able to secure passage for only one of their three daughters through the Kindertransport, they chose to send gifted Lisa to London for safety. As she yearned to be reunited with her family while she lived in a home for refugee children on Willesden Lane, Lisa's music became a beacon of hope. A memoir of courage, survival, and the power of music to uplift the human spirit, this compelling tribute to one special young woman and the lives she touched will both educate and inspire young readers. Featuring line art throughout and B&W photos.