Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits

Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America's Culture
Author: Chip Colwell
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022629904X
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 7880
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Who owns the past and the objects that physically connect us to history? And who has the right to decide this ownership, particularly when the objects are sacred or, in the case of skeletal remains, human? Is it the museums that care for the objects or the communities whose ancestors made them? These questions are at the heart of Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits, an unflinching insider account by a leading curator who has spent years learning how to balance these controversial considerations. Five decades ago, Native American leaders launched a crusade to force museums to return their sacred objects and allow them to rebury their kin. Today, hundreds of tribes use the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to help them recover their looted heritage from museums across the country. As senior curator of anthropology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Chip Colwell has navigated firsthand the questions of how to weigh the religious freedom of Native Americans against the academic freedom of scientists and whether the emptying of museum shelves elevates human rights or destroys a common heritage. This book offers his personal account of the process of repatriation, following the trail of four objects as they were created, collected, and ultimately returned to their sources: a sculpture that is a living god, the scalp of a massacre victim, a ceremonial blanket, and a skeleton from a tribe considered by some to be extinct. These specific stories reveal a dramatic process that involves not merely obeying the law, but negotiating the blurry lines between identity and morality, spirituality and politics. Things, like people, have biographies. Repatriation, Colwell argues, is a difficult but vitally important way for museums and tribes to acknowledge that fact—and heal the wounds of the past while creating a respectful approach to caring for these rich artifacts of history.

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits

Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America's Culture
Author: Chip Colwell,John Stephen Colwell
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022629899X
Category: Art
Page: 348
View: 2542
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Introduction -- Resistance: war gods -- Only after night fall -- Keepers of the sky -- Magic relief -- Tribal resolution -- All things will eat themselves up -- This far away -- Regret: a scalp from Sand Creek -- I have come to kill Indians -- The Bones Bill -- We are going back home -- Indian trophies -- Ac.35b -- A wound of the soul -- Reluctance: killer whale flotilla robe -- Masterless things -- Chief Shakes -- Johnson v. Chilkat Indian Village -- Cranes' last stand -- The weight was heavy -- Our culture is not dying -- Respect: Calusa skulls -- The hardest cases -- Long since completely disappeared -- Unidentifiable -- Their place of understanding -- Timeless limbo -- Before we just gave up -- Conclusion

Native Fashion Now

North American Indian Style
Author: Karen Kramer,Jay Calderin,Madeleine M. Kropa,Jessica R. Metcalfe
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9783791354699
Category: Fashion design
Page: 144
View: 3442
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Celebrating Native American design as an important force in the world of contemporary fashion, this book features beautiful, innovative, and surprising looks from Native American artists. Mainstream American fashion has always been influenced by Native American design, and that's because Native artists have always created exquisite clothing, jewelry, and accessories of their own. But it's only recently that Native designers themselves have started to break into the fashion industry in a big way. Current Native fashion is both wearable and beautiful and, as this volume reveals, increasingly fashion-forward. Divided into sections according to the designers' personal styles, the book showcases the work of dozens of fashion designers, from Virgil Ortiz to Patricia Michaels to Jamie Okuma. The book even includes a few Native-influenced pieces by non-Native designers like Isaac Mizrahi and Ralph Lauren. Native Fashion Now designers have dressed presidents' wives and been finalists on Project Runway, sold their work around the world, and seen it acquired by museums and private collectors. With examples that range from haute couture to casual streetwear, from evening gowns to beaded boots, and from skateboards to umbrellas, Native Fashion Now demonstrates the extraordinary range and talent of designers who honor important cultural traditions while creating breathtaking of-the-moment fashion.

Spirited Encounters

American Indians Protest Museum Policies and Practices
Author: Karen Coody Cooper
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759110892
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 207
View: 5383
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During the twentieth century, American Indians across North America organized protests against traditional museum treatment of Native materials and the Native community. In response, museums began to change their methods. Spirited Encounters provides a foundation for understanding museums, examines how museums collect Native materials, and explores protest as a fully American process of addressing grievances. Now that museums and American Indians are working together in the processes of repatriation, this book can help each side understand the other more fully.

Naamiwan's Drum

The Story of a Contested Repatriation of Anishinaabe Artefacts
Author: Maureen Matthews
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 144262244X
Category: Social Science
Page: 356
View: 5052
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Naamiwan’s Drum follows the story of a famous Ojibwe medicine man, his gifted grandson, and remarkable water drum. This drum, and forty other artefacts, were given away by a Canadian museum to an American Anishinaabe group that had no family or community connections to the collection. Many years passed before the drum was returned to the family and only of the artefacts were ever returned to the museum. Maureen Matthews takes us through this astonishing set of events from multiple perspectives, exploring community and museum viewpoints, visiting the ceremonial group leader in Wisconsin, and finally looking back from the point of view of the drum. The book contains a powerful Anishinaabe interpretive perspective on repatriation and on anthropology itself. Containing fourteen beautiful colour illustrations, Naamiwan’s Drum is a compelling account of repatriation as well as a cautionary tale for museum professionals.

Contesting Knowledge

Museums and Indigenous Perspectives
Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803219482
Category: Social Science
Page: 362
View: 2978
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The essays in section 1 consider ethnography's influence on how Europeans represent colonized peoples. Section 2 essays analyze curatorial practices, emphasizing how exhibitions must serve diverse masters rather than solely the curator's own creativity and judgment, a dramatic departure from past museum culture and practice. Section 3 essays consider tribal museums that focus on contesting and critiquing colonial views of American and Canadian history while serving the varied needs of the indigenous communities.

Exhibiting Religion

Colonialism and Spectacle at International Expositions, 1851-1893
Author: John P. Burris
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813920832
Category: Religion
Page: 211
View: 1455
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"A chronicle of the emergence and development of religion as a field of intellectual inquiry, Exhibiting Religion: Colonialism and Spectacle at International Expositions, 1851-1893 is an extensive survey of world's fairs from the inaugural Great Exhibition in London to the Chicago Columbian Exposition and World's Parliament of Religions. As the first broad gatherings of people from across the world, these events were pivotal forums in which the central elements of a field of religion came into contact with one another."--BOOK JACKET.

Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique


Author: Matthew Liebmann
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759112353
Category: History
Page: 274
View: 6073
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In recent years, postcolonial theories have emerged as one of the significant paradigms of contemporary academia, affecting disciplines throughout the humanities and social sciences. These theories address the complex processes if colonialism on culture and society—with repect to both the colonizers and the colonized—to help us understand the colonial experience in its entirety. The contributors to Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique present critical syntheses of archaeological and postcolonial studies by examining both Old and New World case studies, and they ask what the ultimate effect of postcolonial theorizing will be on the practice of archaeology in the twenty-first century.

Accomplishing NAGPRA

Perspectives on the Intent, Impact, and Future of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act
Author: Sangita Chari,Jaime M. N. Lavallee
Publisher: First Peoples
ISBN: 9780870717208
Category: History
Page: 293
View: 7873
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"More than one million cultural items - and the remains of nearly forty thousand Native Americans - have been repatriated since the 1990 passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The act, which addresses long-standing claims by federally recognized tribes, requires museums and federal agencies to return requested Native American cultural items to lineal descendants, culturally affiliated Indian tribes, and Native Hawai'an organizations. Drawing on case studies, personal reflections, historical documents, and statistics, Accomplishing NAGPRA reveals the day-to-day reality of implementing the act. The volume examines the grassroots, practical application of NAGPRA throughout the United States, reflecting the viewpoints of tribes, museums, federal agencies, attorneys, academics, and others invested in the landmark act"--Unedited summary from book cover.

Yutopian

Archaeology, Ambiguity, and the Production of Knowledge in Northwest Argentina
Author: Joan M. Gero
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292772025
Category: Social Science
Page: 396
View: 3813
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Around 400 BCE, inhabitants of the Southern Andes took up a sedentary lifestyle that included the practice of agriculture. Settlements were generally solitary or clustered structures with walled agricultural fields and animal corrals, and the first small villages appeared in some regions. Surprisingly, people were also producing and circulating exotic goods: polychrome ceramics, copper and gold ornaments, bronze bracelets and bells. To investigate the apparent contradiction between a lack of social complexity and the broad circulation of elaborated goods, archaeologist Joan Gero co-directed a binational project to excavate the site of Yutopian, an unusually well-preserved Early Formative village in the mountains of Northwest Argentina. In Yutopian, Gero describes how archaeologists from the United States and Argentina worked with local residents to uncover the lifeways of the earliest sedentary people of the region. Gero foregounds many experiential aspects of archaeological fieldwork that are usually omitted in the archaeological literature: the tedious labor and constraints of time and personnel, the emotional landscape, the intimate ethnographic settings and Andean people, the socio-politics, the difficult decisions and, especially, the role that ambiguity plays in determining archaeological meanings. Gero's unique approach offers a new model for the site report as she masterfully demonstrates how the decisions made in conducting any scientific undertaking play a fundamental role in shaping the knowledge produced in that project.

Enduring Conquests

Rethinking the Archaeology of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in the Americas
Author: Matthew Liebmann,Melissa Scott Murphy
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691410
Category: History
Page: 325
View: 6872
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Repatriation Reader

Who Owns American Indian Remains?
Author: Devon Abbott Mihesuah
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803206311
Category: History
Page: 335
View: 2040
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Offers various opinions on the ethical, legal, and cultural issues regarding the rights and interests of Native Americans, including discussion on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.

Colonized Through Art

American Indian Schools and Art Education, 1889-1915
Author: Marinella Lentis
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803255446
Category: Art
Page: 450
View: 3237
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"An examination of government-controlled schools' use of art education as a process for assimilating American Indian children at the turn of the twentieth century."--Provided by publisher.

The Changing Presentation of the American Indian

Museums and Native Cultures
Author: W. Richard West
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295997478
Category: Social Science
Page: 119
View: 2860
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Museums--along with books, newspapers, and Wild West shows in the 19th century, movies and television in the 20th--have shaped our perceptions of American Indians. This book brings together six prominent museum professionals--Native and non-Native--to examine the ways in which Indians and their cultures have been represented by museums in North America and to present new directions museums are already taking. Traditional museum exhibitions of Native American art and culture often represented only the past, ignoring the living Native voice. Today, museums have begun to incorporate Native perspectives in their displays. Even more dramatic is the growth in the number of Indian-run museums. These essays explore the relationships being forged between museums and Native communities to create new techniques for presenting Native American culture. This publication will serve to stimulate the discussions and analyses that can lead to new partnerships and collaborations.

Grave Injustice

The American Indian Repatriation Movement and NAGPRA
Author: Kathleen Sue Fine-Dare
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803206274
Category: Social Science
Page: 250
View: 1824
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Grave Injustice is the powerful story of the ongoing struggle of Native Americans to repatriate the objects and remains of their ancestors that were appropriated, collected, manipulated, sold, and displayed by Europeans and Americans. Anthropologist Kathleen S. Fine-Dare focuses on the history and culture of both the impetus to collect and the movement to repatriate Native American remains. Using a straightforward historical framework and illuminating case studies, Fine-Dare first examines the changing cultural reasons for the appropriation of Native American remains. She then traces the succession of incidents, laws, and changing public and Native attitudes that have shaped the repatriation movement since the late nineteenth century. Her discussion and examples make clear that the issue is a complex one, that few clear-cut heroes or villains make up the history of the repatriation movement, and that little consensus about policy or solutions exists within or beyond academic and Native communities. The concluding chapters of this history take up the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), which Fine-Dare considers as a legal and cultural document. This highly controversial federal law was the result of lobbying by American Indian and Native Hawaiian peoples to obtain federal support for the right to bring back to their communities the human remains and associated objects that are housed in federally funded institutions all over the United States. Grave Injustice is a balanced introduction to a longstanding and complicated problem that continues to mobilize and threatens to divide Native Americans and the scholars who work with and write about them.

The Ethics of Archaeology

Philosophical Perspectives on Archaeological Practice
Author: Chris Scarre,Geoffrey Scarre
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139447726
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 5477
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The question of ethics and their role in archaeology has stimulated one of the discipline's liveliest debates. In this collection of essays, first published in 2006, an international team of archaeologists, anthropologists and philosophers explore the ethical issues archaeology needs to address. Marrying the skills and expertise of practitioners from different disciplines, the collection produces interesting insights into many of the ethical dilemmas facing archaeology today. Topics discussed include relations with indigenous peoples; the professional standards and responsibilities of researchers; the role of ethical codes; the notion of value in archaeology; concepts of stewardship and custodianship; the meaning and moral implications of 'heritage'; the question of who 'owns' the past or the interpretation of it; the trade in antiquities; the repatriation of skeletal material; and treatment of the dead. This important collection is essential reading for all those working in the field of archaeology, be they scholar or practitioner.

New Mexico and the Pimería Alta

The Colonial Period in the American Southwest
Author: John G. Douglass,William Graves
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607325748
Category: Social Science
Page: 452
View: 671
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Focusing on the two major areas of the Southwest that witnessed the most intensive and sustained colonial encounters, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta compares how different forms of colonialism and indigenous political economies resulted in diverse outcomes for colonists and Native peoples. Taking a holistic approach and studying both colonist and indigenous perspectives through archaeological, ethnohistorical, historical, and landscape data, contributors examine how the processes of colonialism played out in the American Southwest. Although these broad areas—New Mexico and southern Arizona/northern Sonora—share a similar early colonial history, the particular combination of players, sociohistorical trajectories, and social relations within each area led to, and were transformed by, markedly diverse colonial encounters. Understanding these different mixes of players, history, and social relations provides the foundation for conceptualizing the enormous changes wrought by colonialism throughout the region. The presentations of different cultural trajectories also offer important avenues for future thought and discussion on the strategies for missionization and colonialism. The case studies tackle how cultures evolved in the light of radical transformations in cultural traits or traditions and how different groups reconciled to this change. A much needed up-to-date examination of the colonial era in the Southwest, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta demonstrates the intertwined relationships between cultural continuity and transformation during a time of immense change and highlights contemporary thought on the colonial experience. Contributors: Joseph Aguilar, Jimmy Arterberry, Heather Atherton, Dale Brenneman, J. Andrew Darling, John G. Douglass, B. Sunday Eiselt, Severin Fowles, William M. Graves, Lauren Jelinek, Kelly L. Jenks, Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa, Phillip O. Leckman, Matthew Liebmann, Kent G. Lightfoot, Lindsay Montgomery, Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, Robert Preucel, Matthew Schmader, Thomas E. Sheridan, Colleen Strawhacker, J. Homer Thiel, David Hurst Thomas, Laurie D. Webster

Bone Rooms


Author: Samuel J. Redman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674969731
Category: Science
Page: 405
View: 2067
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In the bone rooms of the Smithsonian Institution and other museums in the late nineteenth century, a scientific revolution was unfolding, as collectors engaged in a global competition to recover the best human skeletons, mummies, fossils. Study of these remains led to the discrediting of racial theory and the search for human origins and evolution.

Good Friday on the Rez

A Pine Ridge Odyssey
Author: David Hugh Bunnell
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 1250112532
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 4154
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Good Friday on the Rez introduces readers to places and people that author, writer, and entrepreneur David Bunnell encounters during his one day, 280-mile road trip from his boyhood Nebraska hometown to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to visit his longtime friend, Vernell White Thunder, a full-blooded Oglala Lakota, descendant of a long line of prominent chiefs and medicine men. This captivating narrative is part memoir and part history. Bunnell shares treasured memories of his time living on and teaching at the reservation. Sometimes raw and sometimes uplifting, Bunnell looks back to expose the difficult life and experiences faced by the descendants of Crazy Horse, Red Cloud, and Sitting Bull while also illuminating their courageous resiliency. Substantive and at times disturbing, Bunnell reflects back to his time on the rez during the violent 70s when he smuggled food to radical Indians at Wounded Knee. Peppered with Vernell White Thunder’s spellbinding stories of growing up in a one-room log house with his medicine man grandfather, Bunnell’s begs the reader to join in on the poignant conversations about present-day Native Americans. Good Friday on the Rez is a dramatic page-turner, an incredible true story that tracks the torment and miraculous resurrection of Native American pride, spirituality, and culture—how things got to be the way they are, where they are going, and why we should care.

Slavery in the Age of Reason

Archaeology at a New England Farm
Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572335653
Category: Social Science
Page: 284
View: 8764
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"Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.