Rethinking Juvenile Justice


Author: Elizabeth S Scott,Laurence D Steinberg
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674043367
Category: Law
Page: 378
View: 5538
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What should we do with teenagers who commit crimes? In this book, two leading scholars in law and adolescent development argue that juvenile justice should be grounded in the best available psychological science, which shows that adolescence is a distinctive state of cognitive and emotional development. Although adolescents are not children, they are also not fully responsible adults.

Rethinking Juvenile Justice


Author: Elizabeth S Scott,Laurence D Steinberg
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674030862
Category: Law
Page: 370
View: 2130
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What should we do with teenagers who commit crimes? In this book, two leading scholars in law and adolescent development argue that juvenile justice should be grounded in the best available psychological science, which shows that adolescence is a distinctive state of cognitive and emotional development. Although adolescents are not children, they are also not fully responsible adults.

A Return to Justice

Rethinking our Approach to Juveniles in the System
Author: Ashley Nellis
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442227672
Category: Law
Page: 156
View: 1079
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Juveniles who commit crimes often find themselves in court systems that do not account for their young age, but it wasn’t always this way. The original aim of a separate juvenile justice system was to treat young offenders as the children they were, considering their unique child status and amenability for reform. Now, after years punishing young offenders as if they were adults, slowly the justice system is making changes that would allow the original vision for juvenile justice to finally materialize. In its original design, the founders focused on treating youth offenders separately from adults and with a different approach. The hallmarks of this approach appreciated the fact that youth cannot fully understand the consequences of their actions and are therefore worthy of reduced culpability. The original design for youth justice prioritized brief and confidential contact with the juvenile justice system, so as to avoid the stigma that would otherwise mar a youth’s chances for success upon release. Rehabilitation was seen as the priority, and efforts to redirect wayward youth were to be implemented when possible and appropriate. The original tenets of the juvenile justice system were slowly dismantled and replaced with a system more like the adult criminal justice system, one which takes no account of age. In recent years, the tide has turned again. The number of incarcerated youth has been cut in half nationally. In addition, juvenile justice practices are increasingly guided by scholarship in adolescent development that confirms important differences between youth and adults. And, states and localities are choosing to invest in evidence based approaches to juvenile crime prevention and intervention rather than in facilities to lock up errant youth. This book assesses the strategies and policies that have produced these important shifts in direction. Important contributing factors include the declining incidence of youth-committed crime, advances in adolescent brain science, nationwide budgetary concerns, focused advocacy with policymakers and practitioners, and successful public education campaigns that address extreme sanctions for youth such as solitary confinement and life sentences without the possibility of parole. Yet more needs to be done. The U.S. Supreme Court has recently voiced its unfaltering conclusion that children are different from adults in a series of landmark cases. The question now is how to take advantage of the opportunity for juvenile justice reform of the kind that would reorient the juvenile justice system to its original intent both in policy and practice, and would return to a system that treats children as children. Using case examples throughout, Nellis offers a compelling history and shows how we might continue on the road to reform.

Justice for Kids

Keeping Kids Out of the Juvenile Justice System
Author: Nancy E. Dowd
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814744087
Category: Law
Page: 323
View: 471
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Children and youth become involved with the juvenile justice system at a significant rate. While some children move just as quickly out of the system and go on to live productive lives as adults, other children become enmeshed in the system, developing deeper problems and or transferring into the adult criminal justice system. Justice for Kids is a volume of work by leading academics and activists that focuses on ways to intervene at the earliest possible point to rehabilitate and redirect—to keep kids out of the system—rather than to punish and drive kids deeper. Justice for Kids presents a compelling argument for rethinking and restructuring the juvenile justice system as we know it. This unique collection explores the system’s fault lines with respect to all children, and focuses in particular on issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation that skew the system. Most importantly, it provides specific program initiatives that offer alternatives to our thinking about prevention and deterrence, with an ultimate focus on keeping kids out of the system altogether.

(In)justice for Juveniles

Rethinking the Best Interests of the Child
Author: Ira M. Schwartz
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780669149630
Category: Political Science
Page: 184
View: 7664
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Criticizes the current juvenile criminal justice system, discusses the incarceration of youths under the guise of psychiatric treatment, and suggests ways to improve the system

A Kind and Just Parent

The Children of Juvenile Court
Author: William Ayers
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807044032
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 206
View: 507
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A teacher in a detention center school describes his experiences with Chicago's juvenile court system and the difficulties of the children who pass through it

Developing Restorative Justice Jurisprudence

Rethinking Responses to Criminal Wrongdoing
Author: Assoc Prof Tony Foley
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409465357
Category: Law
Page: 262
View: 4160
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What are the requirements for a just response to criminal wrongdoing? Drawing on comparative and empirical analysis of existing models of global practice, this book offers an approach aimed at restricting the current limitations of criminal justice process and addressing the current deficiencies. Putting restoration squarely alongside other aims of justice responses, the author argues that only when restorative questions are taken into account can institutional responses be truly said to be just. Using the three primary jurisdictions of Australia, New Zealand and Canada, the book presents the leading examples of restorative justice practices incorporated in mainstream criminal justice systems from around the world. In conclusion, the work provides a fresh insight into how today’s criminal law might develop in order to bring restoration directly into the mix for tomorrow. This book will be of interest to undergraduates, postgraduate researchers and lecturers, as well as lawyers who work in the field of criminal law, criminologists, social scientists and philosophers interested in ideas of wrongdoing and criminal justice responses to criminal offending.

Children, Social Science, and the Law


Author: Bette L. Bottoms,Margaret Bull Kovera,Bradley D. McAuliff
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521664066
Category: Law
Page: 495
View: 2563
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This book provides cutting-edge information available on topics such as child abuse, children's eyewitness testimony, divorce and custody, juvenile crime, and children's rights.

Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores


Author: Dominique DuBois Gilliard
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830887733
Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE
Page: N.A
View: 9154
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The United States has more people locked up in jails, prisons, and detention centers than any other country in the history of the world. Exploring the history and foundations of mass incarceration, Dominique Gilliard examines Christianity's role in its evolution and expansion, assessing justice in light of Scripture, and showing how Christians can pursue justice that restores and reconciles.

The War on Kids

How American Juvenile Justice Lost Its Way
Author: Cara H. Drinan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190605553
Category: Law
Page: 232
View: 2385
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In 2003, when Terrence Graham was sixteen, he and three other teens attempted to rob a barbeque restaurant in Jacksonville, Florida. Though they left with no money, and no one was seriously injured, Terrence was sentenced to die in prison for his involvement in that crime. As shocking as Terrence's sentence sounds, it is merely a symptom of contemporary American juvenile justice practices. In the United States, adolescents are routinely transferred out of juvenile court and into adult criminal court without any judicial oversight. Once in adult court, children can be sentenced without regard for their youth. Juveniles are housed in adult correctional facilities, they may be held in solitary confinement, and they experience the highest rates of sexual and physical assault among inmates. Until 2005, children convicted in America's courts were subject to the death penalty; today, they still may be sentenced to die in prison-no matter what efforts they make to rehabilitate themselves. America has waged a war on kids. In The War on Kids, Cara Drinan reveals how the United States went from being a pioneer to an international pariah in its juvenile sentencing practices. Academics and journalists have long recognized the failings of juvenile justice practices in this country and have called for change. Despite the uncertain political climate, there is hope that recent Supreme Court decisions may finally make those calls a reality. The War on Kids seizes upon this moment of judicial and political recognition that children are different in the eyes of the law. Drinan chronicles the shortcomings of juvenile justice by drawing upon social science, legal decisions, and first-hand correspondence with Terrence and others like him-individuals whose adolescent errors have cost them their lives. At the same time, The War on Kids maps out concrete steps that states can take to correct the course of American juvenile justice.

City of Courts

Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago
Author: Michael Willrich
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521794039
Category: History
Page: 332
View: 9471
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This 2003 book looks at contesting concepts of crime, and social justice in nineteenth-century industrial America.

The Juvenile Justice System in India

From Welfare to Rights
Author: Ved Kumari
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780198065777
Category: Law
Page: 406
View: 2553
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The book explores socio-legal and human rights dimensions of Juvenile Justice System (JJS) in India. Addressing the issue from a wide range of perspectives--sociological, demographic, legislative, judicial, and interventionist--The Juvenile Justice System in India attempts a macro level examination of these issues in a multidimensional perspective. The study identifies the nature, scope, and structure of JJS, and analyzes and identifies the stumbling blocks in its development in India. The author draws together various strands of complex and diverse issues where substantive and procedural lacunae relating to JJS is debated and measures suggested. The Juvenile Justice System in India provides a comparative analysis of provisions of earlier enactment for evolving a comprehensive and integrated Juvenile Justice System in view of the vision and concerns of the lawmakers as also the pattern of implementation under the earlier legislation.

What Children Need


Author: Jane Waldfogel
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674044784
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 288
View: 6760
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What do children need to grow and develop? And how can their needs be met when parents work? Emphasizing the importance of parental choice, quality of care, and work opportunities, economist Jane Waldfogel guides readers through the maze of social science research evidence to offer comprehensive answers and a vision for change. Drawing on the evidence, Waldfogel proposes a bold new plan to better meet the needs of children in working families, from birth through adolescence, while respecting the core values of choice, quality, and work: Allow parents more flexibility to take time off work for family responsibilities; Break the link between employment and essential family benefits; Give mothers and fathers more options to stay home in the first year of life; Improve quality of care from infancy through the preschool years; Increase access to high-quality out-of-school programs for school-aged children and teenagers.

The School-to-Prison Pipeline

Structuring Legal Reform
Author: Catherine Y. Kim,Daniel J. Losen,Damon T. Hewitt
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814763685
Category: Law
Page: 229
View: 400
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Examines the relationship between the law and the school-to-prison pipeline, argues that law can be an effective weapon in the struggle to reduce the number of children caught, and discusses the consequences on families and communities.

Stubborn Children

Controlling Delinquency in the United States, 1640-1981
Author: John R. Sutton
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520084520
Category: History
Page: 299
View: 1611
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John Sutton provides a fascinating account of the changing patterns of reform aimed at the control of children in the United States. He focuses on a series of watershed reforms--from colonial Puritan strategies of child control to the nineteenth-century refuge and reformatory movements, to the juvenile court and the recent movement for deinstitutionalization.

Juvenile Justice in Europe

Past, Present and Future
Author: Barry Goldson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351761218
Category:
Page: 264
View: 6561
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At a time when Europe is witnessing major cultural, social, economic and political challenges and transformations, this book brings together leading researchers and experts to consider a range of pressing questions relating to the historical origins, contemporary manifestations and future prospects for juvenile justice. Questions considered include: How has the history of juvenile justice evolved across Europe and how might the past help us to understand the present and signal the future? What do we know about contemporary juvenile crime trends in Europe and how are nation states responding? Is punitivity and intolerance eclipsing child welfare and pedagogical imperatives, or is ‘child-friendly justice’ holding firm? How might we best understand both the convergent and the divergent patterning of juvenile justice in a changing and reformulating Europe? How is juvenile justice experienced by identifiable constituencies of children and young people both in communities and in institutions? What impacts are sweeping austerity measures, together with increasing mobilities and migrations, imposing? How can comparative juvenile justice be conceptualised and interpreted? What might the future hold for juvenile justice in Europe at a time of profound uncertainty and flux? This book is essential reading for students, tutors and researchers in the fields of criminology, history, law, social policy and sociology, particularly those engaged with childhood and youth studies, human rights, comparative juvenile/youth justice, youth crime and delinquency and criminal justice policy in Europe.

The Challenge of Crime

Rethinking Our Response
Author: Henry S. Ruth,Kevin R. Reitz
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674008915
Category: Law
Page: 374
View: 9837
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AmericaÆs modern encounter with crime is beautifully rendered here, focusing on the gap between reliable information and public policy that has plagued the nationÆs attempts to grapple with its crime problem.

Why Children Follow Rules

Legal Socialization and the Development of Legitimacy
Author: Tom R. Tyler,Rick Trinker
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190644141
Category: Law
Page: 280
View: 4640
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Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Legal socialization & the elements of legitimacy -- General approaches to legal socialization -- Legal socialization across the life course -- Models of legal socialization -- Developing values and attitudes about the law -- The development and legal competency -- Neurological development and legal competency -- Socialization across the spheres of childhood -- Legal socialization in the family -- Legal socialization in the school -- Legal socialization in the juvenile justice system -- Conclusion & final thoughts -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice


Author: David S. Tanenhaus
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479834440
Category: Law
Page: 256
View: 8569
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This is a hopeful but complicated era for those with ambitions to reform the juvenile courts and youth-serving public institutions in the United States. As advocates plea for major reforms, many fear the public backlash in making dramatic changes. Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice provides a look at the recent trends in juvenile justice as well as suggestions for reforms and policy changes in the future. Should youth be treated as adults when they break the law? How can youth be deterred from crime? What factors should be considered in how youth are punished?What role should the police have in schools? This essential volume, edited by two of the leading scholars on juvenile justice, and with contributors who are among the key experts on each issue, the volume focuses on the most pressing issues of the day: the impact of neuroscience on our understanding of brain development and subsequent sentencing, the relationship of schools and the police, the issue of the school-to-prison pipeline, the impact of immigration, the privacy of juvenile records, and the need for national policies—including registration requirements--for juvenile sex offenders. Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice is not only a timely collection, based on the most current research, but also a forward-thinking volume that anticipates the needs for substantive and future changes in juvenile justice.