Dio's Roman History


Author: Cassius Dio Cocceianus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Roman law
Page: N.A
View: 9952



Livy


Author: Livy
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 238
View: 6423



The Roman History

The Reign of Augustus
Author: Cassius Dio Cocceianus
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780140444483
Category: History
Page: 348
View: 1608

Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of Rome (27 BC�AD 14), brought peace and prosperity to his city after decades of savage civil war. This selection from Cassius Dio�s Roman History gives the fullest description of that long struggle and ultimate triumph � detailing the brutal battles and political feuds that led to the collapse of Rome�s 400-year-old republic, and Augustus� subsequent reign as emperor. Included are accounts of military campaigns from Ethiopia to Yugoslavia, and of long conflict with Antony and Cleopatra. With skill and artistry, Dio brings to life many speeches from the era � among them Augustus� damning indictment of Antony�s passion for the Egyptian queen � and provides a fascinating account of the debate between the great general Agrippa and Maecenas on the virtues of republicanism and monarchy.

Herodian

in two volumes
Author: Herodian
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Rome
Page: 6
View: 5919



Epitome of Roman history


Author: Lucius Annaeus Florus,Edward Seymour Forster
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: 9780674992542
Category: History
Page: 381
View: 9880

Florus, born apparently in Africa, lived in Spain and in Rome in Hadrian's time. He wrote, in brief pointed rhetorical style, a summary of Roman history (especially wars) in two books in order to show the greatness and decline of Roman morals. It is based chiefly on Livy. It was perhaps planned to reach his own times, but the extant work ends with Augustus's reign (30 BCE–14 CE). This Epitome is a useful rapid sketch of Roman military history. Poetry by Florus is also available in the Loeb Classical Library, in Minor Latin Poets, Volume II.

The War with Hannibal

The History of Rome from its Foundation
Author: Livy
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141963069
Category: History
Page: 720
View: 2635

In The War with Hannibal, Livy (59 BC-AD 17) chronicles the events of the Second Punic War between Rome and Carthage, until the Battle of Zama in 202 BC. He vividly recreates the immense armies of Hannibal, complete with elephants, crossing the Alps; the panic as they approached the gates of Rome; and the decimation of the Roman army at the Battle of Lake Trasimene. Yet it is also the clash of personalities that fascinates Livy, from great debates in the Senate to the historic meeting between Scipio and Hannibal before the decisive battle. Livy never hesitates to introduce both intense drama and moral lessons into his work, and here he brings a turbulent episode in history powerfully to life.

Christian Identity in Corinth

A Comparative Study of 2 Corinthians, Epictetus and Valerius Maximums
Author: V. Henry T. Nguyen
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck
ISBN: 9783161496660
Category: Religion
Page: 272
View: 4041

V. Henry T. Nguyen explores the social dynamics of Christian identity in the apostle Paul's second letter to the Corinthians. He examines Paul's approach to Christian identity in light of a large preoccupation with superficial features of identity that was prevalent in the Graceo-Roman social world.

Roman Palmyra

Identity, Community, and State Formation
Author: Andrew M. Smith II
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199861102
Category: History
Page: 293
View: 9804

This history of Roman Palmyra offers an examination of how the Palmyrenes constructed and maintained a unique identity, individually and collectively, amid progressive communal changes.

The Geography of Strabo


Author: Strabo
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Geography, Ancient
Page: N.A
View: 7106



Dio's Roman History

With an English Translation
Author: Cassius Dio Cocceianus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Rome
Page: N.A
View: 2016



Arms and Armour of the Imperial Roman Soldier


Author: Graham Summer,Raffaele D'Amato
Publisher: Frontline Books
ISBN: 1848325126
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 5421

From the Latin warriors on the Palatine Hill in the age of Romulus, to the last defenders of Constantinople in 1453 AD, the weaponry of the Roman Army was constantly evolving. Through glory and defeat, the Roman warrior adapted to the changing face of warfare. Due to the immense size of the Roman Empire, which reached from the British Isles to the Arabian Gulf, the equipment of the Roman soldier varied greatly from region to region.Through the use of materials such as leather, linen and felt, the army was able to adjust its equipment to these varied climates. Arms and Armour of the Imperial Roman Soldier sheds new light on the many different types of armour used by the Roman soldier, and combines written and artistic sources with the analysis of old and new archaeological finds. With a huge wealth of plates and illustrations, which include ancient paintings, mosaics, sculptures and coin depictions, this book gives the reader an unparalleled visual record of this fascinating period of military history. This book, the first of three volumes, examines the period from Marius to Commodus. Volume II covers the period from Commodus to Justinian, and Volume III will look at the period from Romulus to Marius.

The Middle East Under Rome


Author: Maurice Sartre
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674016835
Category: History
Page: 665
View: 8734

The ancient Middle East was the theater of passionate interaction between Phoenicians, Aramaeans, Arabs, Jews, Greeks, and Romans. At the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, and the Arabian peninsula, the area dominated by what the Romans called Syria was at times a scene of violent confrontation, but more often one of peaceful interaction, of prosperous cultivation, energetic production, and commerce--a crucible of cultural, religious, and artistic innovations that profoundly determined the course of world history. Maurice Sartre has written a long overdue and comprehensive history of the Semitic Near East (modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Israel) from the eve of the Roman conquest to the end of the third century C.E. and the dramatic rise of Christianity. Sartre's broad yet finely detailed perspective takes in all aspects of this history, not just the political and military, but economic, social, cultural, and religious developments as well. He devotes particular attention to the history of the Jewish people, placing it within that of the whole Middle East. Drawing upon the full range of ancient sources, including literary texts, Greek, Latin, and Semitic inscriptions, and the most recent archaeological discoveries, The Middle East under Rome will be an indispensable resource for students and scholars. This absorbing account of intense cultural interaction will also engage anyone interested in the history of the Middle East.

Dress and Personal Appearance in Late Antiquity

The Clothing of the Middle and Lower Classes
Author: Faith Pennick Morgan
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004353461
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 8108

Dress and Personal Appearance in Late Antiquity. The Clothing of the Middle and Lower Classes examines written, art historical and archaeological evidence to understand the way that cloth and clothing was made, embellished, cared for and recycled during this period.

The People’s Zion

Southern Africa, the United States, and a Transatlantic Faith-Healing Movement
Author: Joel Cabrita
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674985761
Category: History
Page: 340
View: 2344

In The People’s Zion, Joel Cabrita tells the transatlantic story of Southern Africa’s largest popular religious movement, Zionism. It began in Zion City, a utopian community established in 1900 just north of Chicago. The Zionist church, which promoted faith healing, drew tens of thousands of marginalized Americans from across racial and class divides. It also sent missionaries abroad, particularly to Southern Africa, where its uplifting spiritualism and pan-racialism resonated with urban working-class whites and blacks. Circulated throughout Southern Africa by Zion City’s missionaries and literature, Zionism thrived among white and black workers drawn to Johannesburg by the discovery of gold. As in Chicago, these early devotees of faith healing hoped for a color-blind society in which they could acquire equal status and purpose amid demoralizing social and economic circumstances. Defying segregation and later apartheid, black and white Zionists formed a uniquely cosmopolitan community that played a key role in remaking the racial politics of modern Southern Africa. Connecting cities, regions, and societies usually considered in isolation, Cabrita shows how Zionists on either side of the Atlantic used the democratic resources of evangelical Christianity to stake out a place of belonging within rapidly-changing societies. In doing so, they laid claim to nothing less than the Kingdom of God. Today, the number of American Zionists is small, but thousands of independent Zionist churches counting millions of members still dot the Southern African landscape.

The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus

In Seven Volumes
Author: Dionysius (Halicarnassensis),Earnest Cary,Edward Spelman
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 3323



A Loeb Classical Library Reader


Author: N.A
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: 9780674996168
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 234
View: 6473

This selection of lapidary nuggets drawn from thirty-three of antiquity's major authors includes poetry, dialogue, philosophical writing, history, descriptive reporting, satire, and fiction--giving a glimpse at the wide range of arts and sciences, thought and styles, of Greco-Roman culture. The selections span twelve centuries, from Homer to Saint Jerome. The texts and translations are reproduced as they appear in Loeb volumes. The Loeb Classical Library is the only existing series of books which, through original text and facing English translation, gives access to all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. The Loeb Classical Library Reader offers a unique sampling of this treasure trove. In these pages you will find, for example: Odysseus tricking the Cyclops in order to escape from the giant's cave; Zeus creating the first woman, Pandora, cause of mortals' hardships ever after; the Athenian general Nicias dissuading his countrymen from invading Sicily; Socrates, condemned to die, saying farewell; a description of Herod's fortified palace at Masada; Cicero's thoughts on what we owe our fellow men; Livy's description of the rape of the Sabine women; Manilius on the signs of the zodiac; Pliny's observation of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE. Here you can enjoy looking in on people, real and imaginary, who figure prominently in ancient history, and on notable events. Here, too, you can relish classical poetry and comedy, and get a taste of the ideas characteristic of the splendid culture to which we are heir.

Appian's Roman History


Author: Apiano
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 617
View: 6338

Appian (Appianus) was a Greek official of Alexandria. He saw the Jewish rebellion of 116 CE, and later became a Roman citizen and advocate and received the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died during the reign of Antoninus Pius who was emperor 138?161 CE. Honest admirer of the Roman empire though ignorant of the institutions of the earlier Roman republic, he wrote, in the simple 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', in fact conquests, from the beginnings to the times of Trajan (emperor 98?117 CE). Eleven have come down to us complete, or nearly so, namely those on the Spanish, Hannibalic, Punic, Illyrian, Syrian, and Mithridatic wars, and five books on the Civil Wars. They are valuable records of military history. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Appian is in four volumes.

The History of Rome


Author: Livy
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Rome
Page: N.A
View: 3849



Books for College Libraries: Language and literature


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780838901786
Category: Academic libraries
Page: N.A
View: 1444



Suetonius

Julius, Augustus, Tiberius, Gaius, Caligula
Author: Suetonius,John Carew Rolfe
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 507
View: 8585

Suetonius (C. Suetonius Tranquillus, born ca. 70 CE), son of a military tribune, was at first an advocate and a teacher of rhetoric, but later became the emperor Hadrian's private secretary, 119–121. He dedicated to C. Septicius Clarus, prefect of the praetorian guard, his Lives of the Caesars. After the dismissal of both men for some breach of court etiquette, Suetonius apparently retired and probably continued his writing. His other works, many known by title, are now lost except for part of the Lives of Illustrious Men (of letters). Friend of Pliny the Younger, Suetonius was a studious and careful collector of facts, so that the extant lives of the emperors (including Julius Caesar the dictator) to Domitian are invaluable. His plan in Lives of the Caesars is: the emperor's family and early years; public and private life; death. We find many anecdotes, much gossip of the imperial court, and various details of character and personal appearance. Suetonius's account of Nero's death is justly famous. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Suetonius is in two volumes. Both volumes were revised throughout in 1997-98, and a new Introduction added.