Rome's Gothic Wars

From the Third Century to Alaric
Author: Michael Kulikowski
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139458094
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8522
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Rome's Gothic Wars is a concise introduction to research on the Roman Empire's relations with one of the most important barbarian groups of the ancient world. The book uses archaeological and historical evidence to look not just at the course of events, but at the social and political causes of conflict between the empire and its Gothic neighbours. In eight chapters, Michael Kulikowski traces the history of Romano-Gothic relations from their earliest stage in the third century, through the development of strong Gothic politics in the early fourth century, until the entry of many Goths into the empire in 376 and the catastrophic Gothic war that followed. The book closes with a detailed look at the career of Alaric, the powerful Gothic general who sacked the city of Rome in 410.

American Book Publishing Record


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 1856
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Julian the Apostate


Author: Glen Warren Bowersock
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674488823
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 135
View: 5222
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This portrayal of one of antiquity's most enigmatic figures offers a vivid and compact assessment of the Apostate's life and reign. Proceeding directly from an evaluation of the ancient sources - the testimony of friends and enemies of Julian as well as the writings of the emperor himself - the author traces Julian's youth, his years as the commander of the Roman forces in Gaul, and his emergence as sole ruler in the course of a dramatic march to Constantinople. In Bowersock's analysis of Julian's religious revolution, the emperor's ardent espousal of a lost cause is seen to have made intolerable demands upon pagans, Jews, and Christians alike.

Roman History: Late Antiquity: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide


Author: Oxford University Press
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199802913
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 30
View: 8463
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This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Classics, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of classics. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

Constantine: Roman Emperor, Christian Victor


Author: Paul Stephenson
Publisher: The Overlook Press
ISBN: 1468303007
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 5895
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A fascinating survey of the life and enduring legacy of perhaps the greatest and most unjustly ignored of the Roman emperors-written by a richly gifted historian. In 312 A.D., Constantine-one of four Roman emperors ruling a divided empire-marched on Rome to establish his control. On the eve of the battle, a cross appeared to him in the sky with an exhortation, "By this sign conquer." Inscribing the cross on the shields of his soldiers, Constantine drove his rivals into the Tiber and claimed the imperial capital for himself. Under Constantine, Christianity emerged from the shadows, its adherents no longer persecuted. Constantine united the western and eastern halves of the Roman Empire. He founded a new capital city, Constantinople. Thereafter the Christian Roman Empire endured in the East, while Rome itself fell to the barbarian hordes. Paul Stephenson offers a nuanced and deeply satisfying account of a man whose cultural and spiritual renewal of the Roman Empire gave birth to the idea of a unified Christian Europe underpinned by a commitment to religious tolerance.

The Day of the Barbarians

The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire
Author: Alessandro Barbero
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9780802718976
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 3986
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On August 9, 378 AD, at Adrianople in the Roman province of Thrace (now western Turkey), the Roman Empire began to fall. Two years earlier, an unforeseen flood of refugees from the East Germanic tribe known as the Goths had arrived at the Empire's eastern border, seeking admittance. Though usually successful in dealing with barbarian groups, in this instance the Roman authorities failed. Gradually coalesced into an army led by Fritigern, the barbarian horde inflicted on Emperor Valens the most disastrous defeat suffered by the Roman army since Hannibal's victory at Cannae almost 600 years earlier. The Empire did not actually fall for another century, but some believe this battle signaled nothing less than the end of the ancient world and the start of the Middle Ages. With impeccable scholarship and narrative flair, renowned historian Alessandro Barbero places the battle in its historical context, chronicling the changes in the Roman Empire, west and east, the cultural dynamics at its borders, and the extraordinary administrative challenge in holding it together. Vividly recreating the events leading to the clash, he brings alive leaders and common soldiers alike, comparing the military tactics and weaponry of the barbarians with those of the disciplined Roman army as the battle unfolded on that epic afternoon. Narrating one of the turning points in world history, The Day of the Barbarians is military history at its very best.

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire


Author: Edward Gibbon
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Byzantine Empire
Page: N.A
View: 863
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The Conquests of Alexander the Great


Author: Waldemar Heckel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107394651
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 2436
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In this book, Waldemar Heckel traces the rise and eventual fall of one of the most successful military commanders in history. In 325 BCE, Alexander and his conquering army prepared to return home, after overcoming everything in their path: armies, terrain, climate, all invariably hostile. Little did they know that within two years their beloved king would be dead and their labours seemingly wasted. Tracing the rise and eventual fall of one of the most successful military commanders in history, Heckel engagingly and with great detail shows us how Alexander earned his appellation, The Great.

The Gothic War

Rome's Final Conflict in the West
Author: Torsten Cumberland Jacobsen
Publisher: Westholme Publishing
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 370
View: 9280
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Traces the efforts of the emperor Justinian to recapture areas of the Western Roman Empire that had been lost to invading barbarians in preceding centuries, discussing the long campaigns for Italy and the three sieges of Rome that left the city a ruin.

Imperial Triumph

The Roman World from Hadrian to Constantine
Author: Michael Kulikowski
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781846683718
Category:
Page: 386
View: 4691
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Imperial Triumph presents the history of Rome at the height of its imperial power. Beginning with the reign of Hadrian in Rome and ending with the death of Julian the Apostate on campaign in Persia, it offers an intimate account of the twists and often deadly turns of imperial politics in which successive emperors rose and fell with sometimes bewildering rapidity. Yet, despite this volatility, the Romans were able to see off successive attacks by Parthians, Germans, Persians and Goths and to extend and entrench their position as masters of Europe and the Mediterranean. This books shows how they managed to do it.Professor Michael Kulikowski describes the empire's cultural integration in the second century, the political crises of the third when Rome's Mediterranean world became subject to the larger forces of Eurasian history, and the remaking of Roman imperial institutions in the fourth century under Constantine and his son Constantius II. The Constantinian revolution, Professor Kulikowski argues, was the pivot on which imperial fortunes turned - and the beginning of the parting of ways between the eastern and western empires.This sweeping account of one of the world's greatest empires at its magnificent peak is incisive, authoritative and utterly gripping.

The Classical Review


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Classical philology
Page: N.A
View: 5977
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The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World


Author: Edward Shepherd Creasy
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1329919904
Category: History
Page: 252
View: 5809
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Edward Creasy's 1851 military analysis of fifteen world battles is a classic of its genre. Appearing between Clausewitz's On War (1832) and Ardant Du Picq's Battle Studies (composed c.1870), The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo is essential reading for military historians.

Music and the Making of a New South


Author: Gavin James Campbell
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807863351
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 4873
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Startled by rapid social changes at the turn of the twentieth century, citizens of Atlanta wrestled with fears about the future of race relations, the shape of gender roles, the impact of social class, and the meaning of regional identity in a New South. Gavin James Campbell demonstrates how these anxieties were played out in Atlanta's popular musical entertainment. Examining the period from 1890 to 1925, Campbell focuses on three popular musical institutions: the New York Metropolitan Opera (which visited Atlanta each year), the Colored Music Festival, and the Georgia Old-Time Fiddlers' Convention. White and black audiences charged these events with deep significance, Campbell argues, turning an evening's entertainment into a struggle between rival claimants for the New South's soul. Opera, spirituals, and fiddling became popular not just because they were entertaining, but also because audiences found them flexible enough to accommodate a variety of competing responses to the challenges of making a New South. Campbell shows how attempts to inscribe music with a single, public, fixed meaning were connected to much larger struggles over the distribution of social, political, cultural, and economic power. Attitudes about music extended beyond the concert hall to simultaneously enrich and impoverish both the region and the nation that these New Southerners struggled to create.

Conquerors of the Roman Empire: The Vandals


Author: Simon MacDowall
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 147388022X
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 6852
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On 31 December AD 406, a group of German tribes crossed the Rhine, pierced the Roman defensive limes and began a rampage across Roman Gaul, sacking cities such as Metz, Arras and Strasbourg. Foremost amongst them were the Vandals and their search for a new homeland took them on the most remarkable odyssey. The Romans were unable to stop them and their closest allies, the Alans, marching the breadth of Gaul, crossing the Pyrenees and making themselves masters of Spain. However, this Kingdom of the Vandals and Alans soon came under intense pressure from Rome’s Visigothic allies. In 429, under their new king, Gaiseric, they crossed the straits of Gibraltar to North Africa. They quickly overran this rich Roman province and established a stable kingdom. Taking to the seas they soon dominated the Western Mediterranean and raided Italy, famously sacking Rome itself in 455. Eventually, however, they were utterly conquered by Belisarius in 533 and vanished from history. Simon MacDowall narrates and analyses these events, with particular focus on the evolution of Vandal armies and warfare.

The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Rome


Author: Paul Erdkamp
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521896290
Category: History
Page: 625
View: 3521
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Rome was the largest city in the ancient world. As the capital of the Roman Empire, it was clearly an exceptional city in terms of size, diversity and complexity. While the Colosseum, imperial palaces and Pantheon are among its most famous features, this volume explores Rome primarily as a city in which many thousands of men and women were born, lived and died. The thirty-one chapters by leading historians, classicists and archaeologists discuss issues ranging from the monuments and the games to the food and water supply, from policing and riots to domestic housing, from death and disease to pagan cults and the impact of Christianity. Richly illustrated, the volume introduces groundbreaking new research against the background of current debates and is designed as a readable survey accessible in particular to undergraduates and non-specialists.

Ethnische Identität im Entstehungsprozess des spanischen Westgotenreiches


Author: Manuel Koch
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 311025851X
Category: History
Page: 466
View: 3234
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In the past the ethnic duality of the Visigoths and the Hispano-Romans has been seen as one of the main characteristics in the formation of the Spanish Visigothic kingdom. This study shows that, instead of an ethnic division of the population, a Gothic identity, which was above all politically defined, was already applied to the entire population in the 6th century, and that overall it had less effect than is generally assumed.

History of European morals from Augustus to Charlemagne


Author: William Edward Hartpole Lecky
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Ethics
Page: N.A
View: 2525
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Gymnasium


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Classical education
Page: N.A
View: 3614
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How The Irish Saved Civilization

The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe
Author: Thomas Cahill
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1444719750
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 9686
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Ireland played the central role in maintaining European culture when the dark ages settled on Europe in the fifth century: as Rome was sacked by Visigoths and its empire collapsed, Ireland became 'the isle of saints and scholars' that enabled the classical and religious heritage to be saved. In his compelling and entertaining narrative, Thomas Cahill tells the story of how Irish monks and scrines copied the mauscripts of both pagan and Christian writers, including Homer and Aristotle, while libraries on the continent were lost forever. Bringing the past and its characters to life, Cahill captures the sensibility of the unsung Irish who relaunched civilisation.

A Guide to the Study and Use of Military History


Author: John E. Jessup
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 9780160873263
Category: Military history
Page: 507
View: 9237
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