Sisters

The Lives of America's Suffragists
Author: Jean H. Baker
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 0374707162
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 6924
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How the Personal Became Political In the Fight to Grant Women Civil Rights They forever changed America: Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Willard, Alice Paul. At their revolution's start in the 1840s, a woman's right to speak in public was questioned. By its conclusion in 1920, the victory in woman's suffrage had also encompassed the most fundamental rights of citizenship: the right to control wages, hold property, to contract, to sue, to testify in court. Their struggle was confrontational (women were the first to picket the White House for a political cause) and violent (women were arrested, jailed, and force-fed in prisons). And like every revolutionary before them, their struggle was personal. For the first time, the eminent historian Jean H. Baker tellingly interweaves these women's private lives with their public achievements, presenting these revolutionary women in three dimensions, humanized, and marvelously approachable.

Co-Whites

How and Why White Women 'Betrayed' the Struggle for Racial Equality in the United States
Author: Emeka Aniagolu
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 0761853405
Category: Social Science
Page: 337
View: 3273
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Aniagolu examines the dynamics of race and gender in the history of the United States, concluding that white American women collaborated with white American men as 'Co-Whites' or co-partners in the management and maintenance of white supremacy in the United States.

Lucretia Mott's Heresy

Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Author: Carol Faulkner
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812205008
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 6274
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Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians, urban mobs, and her fellow Quakers. In the first biography of Mott in a generation, historian Carol Faulkner reveals the motivations of this radical egalitarian from Nantucket. Mott's deep faith and ties to the Society of Friends do not fully explain her activism—her roots in post-Revolutionary New England also shaped her views on slavery, patriarchy, and the church, as well as her expansive interests in peace, temperance, prison reform, religious freedom, and Native American rights. While Mott was known as the "moving spirit" of the first women's rights convention at Seneca Falls, her commitment to women's rights never trumped her support for abolition or racial equality. She envisioned women's rights not as a new and separate movement but rather as an extension of the universal principles of liberty and equality. Mott was among the first white Americans to call for an immediate end to slavery. Her long-term collaboration with white and black women in the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was remarkable by any standards. Lucretia Mott's Heresy reintroduces readers to an amazing woman whose work and ideas inspired the transformation of American society.

Fat Shame

Stigma and the Fat Body in American Culture
Author: Amy Erdman Farrell
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814728340
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 219
View: 6729
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To be fat hasn’t always occasioned the level of hysteria that this condition receives today and indeed was once considered an admirable trait. Fat Shame: Stigma and the Fat Body in American Culture explores this arc, from veneration to shame, examining the historic roots of our contemporary anxiety about fatness. Tracing the cultural denigration of fatness to the mid 19th century, Amy Farrell argues that the stigma associated with a fat body preceded any health concerns about a large body size. Firmly in place by the time the diet industry began to flourish in the 1920s, the development of fat stigma was related not only to cultural anxieties that emerged during the modern period related to consumer excess, but, even more profoundly, to prevailing ideas about race, civilization and evolution. For 19th and early 20th century thinkers, fatness was a key marker of inferiority, of an uncivilized, barbaric, and primitive body. This idea—that fatness is a sign of a primitive person—endures today, fueling both our $60 billion “war on fat” and our cultural distress over the “obesity epidemic.” Farrell draws on a wide array of sources, including political cartoons, popular literature, postcards, advertisements, and physicians’ manuals, to explore the link between our historic denigration of fatness and our contemporary concern over obesity. Her work sheds particular light on feminisms’ fraught relationship to fatness. From the white suffragists of the early 20th century to contemporary public figures like Oprah Winfrey, Monica Lewinsky, and even the Obama family, Farrell explores the ways that those who seek to shed stigmatized identities—whether of gender, race, ethnicity or class—often take part in weight reduction schemes and fat mockery in order to validate themselves as “civilized.” In sharp contrast to these narratives of fat shame are the ideas of contemporary fat activists, whose articulation of a new vision of the body Farrell explores in depth. This book is significant for anyone concerned about the contemporary “war on fat” and the ways that notions of the “civilized body” continue to legitimate discrimination and cultural oppression.

America on the Eve of the Civil War


Author: Edward L. Ayers
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813930634
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 147
View: 783
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The first in a series of annual Signature Conferences sponsored by the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission, "America on the Eve of the Civil War" was held in April 2009.

American Civil War: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection [6 volumes]

The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection
Author: Spencer C. Tucker
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1851096825
Category: History
Page: 2777
View: 1156
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This expansive, multivolume reference work provides a broad, multidisciplinary examination of the Civil War period ranging from pre-Civil War developments and catalysts such as the Mexican-American War to the rebuilding of the war-torn nation during Reconstruction.

1877

America's Year of Living Violently
Author: Michael Bellesiles
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 159558594X
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 718
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In 1877, a decade after the Civil War, not only was the United States gripped by a deep depression, but the country was also in the throes of nearly unimaginable violence and upheaval marking the end of the brief period known as Reconstruction and a return to white rule across the South. In the wake of the contested presidential election of 1876, white supremacist mobs swept across the South, killing and driving out the last of the Reconstruction state governments. A strike involving millions of railroad workers turned violent as it spread from coast-to-coast, and for a moment seemed close to toppling the nation’s economic structure. In 1877, celebrated historian Michael Bellesiles reveals that the fires of that fated year also fueled a hothouse of cultural and intellectual innovation. Bellesiles relates the story of 1877 not just through dramatic events, but also through the lives of famous and little-known Americans.

Lucy Stone

An Unapologetic Life
Author: Sally G. McMillen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019938505X
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 6178
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In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century American women suffragists: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. "Historically," the inscription beneath the marble statue notes, "these three stand unique and peerless." In fact, the statue has a glaring omission: Lucy Stone. A pivotal leader in the fight for both abolition and gender equality, her achievements marked the beginning of the women's rights movement and helped to lay the groundwork for the eventual winning of women's suffrage. Yet, today most Americans have never heard of Lucy Stone. Sally McMillen sets out to address this significant historical oversight in this engaging biography. Exploring her extraordinary life and the role she played in crafting a more just society, McMillen restores Lucy Stone to her rightful place at the center of the nineteenth-century women's rights movement. Raised in a middle-class Massachusetts farm family, Stone became convinced at an early age that education was key to women's independence and selfhood, and went on to attend the Oberlin Collegiate Institute. When she graduated in 1847 as one of the first women in the US to earn a college degree, she was drawn into the public sector as an activist and quickly became one of the most famous orators of her day. Lecturing on anti-slavery and women's rights, she was instrumental in organizing and speaking at several annual national woman's rights conventions throughout the 1850s. She played a critical role in the organization and leadership of the American Equal Rights Association during the Civil War, and, in 1869, cofounded the American Woman Suffrage Association, one of two national women's rights organizations that fought for women's right to vote. Encompassing Stone's marriage to Henry Blackwell and the birth of their daughter Alice, as well as her significant friendships with Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, and others, McMillen's biography paints a complete picture of Stone's influential and eminently important life and work. Self-effacing until the end of her life, Stone did not relish the limelight the way Elizabeth Cady Stanton did, nor did she gain the many followers whom Susan B. Anthony attracted through her extensive travels and years of dedicated work. Yet her contributions to the woman's rights movement were no less significant or revolutionary than those of her more widely lauded peers. In this accessible, readable, and historically-grounded work, Lucy Stone is finally given the standing she deserves.

Achtzig Jahre und mehr


Author: Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Publisher: ein-FACH-verlag
ISBN: 3928089587
Category:
Page: 410
View: 6697
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Powers of Two

Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs
Author: Joshua Wolf Shenk
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544031598
Category: ART
Page: 339
View: 2500
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A curator and essayist surveys the inner workings of creative duos, from John Lennon and Paul McCartney to Marie and Pierre Curie to Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, and describes how their creative techniques can be adapted and used in everyday life. 50,000 first printing.

Lincoln and New York


Author: Harold Holzer
Publisher: Philip Wilson Publishers
ISBN: 0856676691
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 277
View: 6181
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The book, based on an important exhibition at the New-York Historical Society of original artifacts, iconic images and hand-written period documents, fully traces for the first time the evolution of Lincoln’s relationship with the nation’s largest and wealthiest city. New York’s role as the Union’s prime provider of manpower, money, media coverage, and protest is vividly explored alongside Lincoln’s accompanying growth as a leader, writer, symbol of union and freedom, and, in the final instance, national martyr. Edited by award-winning Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer the book features chapters by some of the leading authorities on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War.

Twentieth Century, 1901-1940


Author: Robert F. Gorman
Publisher: Salem PressInc
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 3453
View: 2562
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Presents essays arranged in chronological order on key world events that occurred in such areas as politics, science, medicine, communications, literature, music, philosophy, and international affairs during the first forty years of the twentieth century.

Women and the U.S. Constitution, 1776-1920


Author: Jean H. Baker
Publisher: American Historical Assn.
ISBN: 0872291634
Category: Married women
Page: 57
View: 1065
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American Reference Books Annual


Author: Bohdan S. Wynar
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Reference books
Page: N.A
View: 4942
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1970- issued in 2 vols.: v. 1, General reference, social sciences, history, economics, business; v. 2, Fine arts, humanities, science and engineering.

Margaret Sanger

A Life of Passion
Author: Jean H. Baker
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429968974
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 368
View: 8591
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Undoubtedly the most influential advocate for birth control even before the term existed, Margaret Sanger ignited a movement that has shaped our society to this day. Her views on reproductive rights have made her a frequent target of conservatives and so-called family values activists. Yet lately even progressives have shied away from her, citing socialist leanings and a purported belief in eugenics as a blight on her accomplishments. In this captivating new biography, the renowned feminist historian Jean H. Baker rescues Sanger from such critiques and restores her to the vaunted place in history she once held. Trained as a nurse and midwife in the gritty tenements of New York's Lower East Side, Sanger grew increasingly aware of the dangers of unplanned pregnancy—both physical and psychological. A botched abortion resulting in the death of a poor young mother catalyzed Sanger, and she quickly became one of the loudest voices in favor of sex education and contraception. The movement she started spread across the country, eventually becoming a vast international organization with her as its spokeswoman. Sanger's staunch advocacy for women's privacy and freedom extended to her personal life as well. After becoming a wife and mother at a relatively early age, she abandoned the trappings of home and family for a globe-trotting life as a women's rights activist. Notorious for the sheer number of her romantic entanglements, Sanger epitomized the type of "free love" that would become mainstream only at the very end of her life. That she lived long enough to see the creation of the birth control pill—which finally made planned pregnancy a reality—is only fitting.

American Book Publishing Record


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 5793
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Suffragists in an Imperial Age

U.S. Expansion and the Woman Question, 1870-1929
Author: Allison L. Sneider
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199886512
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 4233
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In 1899, Carrie Chapman Catt, who succeeded Susan B. Anthony as head of the National American Women Suffrage Association, argued that it was the "duty" of U.S. women to help lift the inhabitants of its new island possessions up from "barbarism" to "civilization," a project that would presumably demonstrate the capacity of U.S. women for full citizenship and political rights. Catt, like many suffragists in her day, was well-versed in the language of empire, and infused the cause of suffrage with imperialist zeal in public debate. Unlike their predecessors, who were working for votes for women within the context of slavery and abolition, the next generation of suffragists argued their case against the backdrop of the U.S. expansionism into Indian and Mormon territory at home as well as overseas in the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii. In this book, Allison L. Sneider carefully examines these simultaneous political movements--woman suffrage and American imperialism--as inextricably intertwined phenomena, instructively complicating the histories of both.

From Preachers to Suffragists

Woman's Rights and Religious Conviction in the Lives of Three Nineteenth-century American Clergywomen
Author: Beverly Ann Zink-Sawyer
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 9780664226152
Category: Religion
Page: 246
View: 3360
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Examines the lives and writings of three nineteenth-century clergywomen including Antoinette Brown Blackwell, Olympia Brown, and Anna Howard Shaw, who viewed the suffrage movement as an extension of their ministries, citing their pivotal contributions to women's rights. Original.

American Christianities

A History of Dominance and Diversity
Author: Catherine A. Brekus,W. Clark Gilpin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807869147
Category: Religion
Page: 544
View: 5631
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From the founding of the first colonies until the present, the influence of Christianity, as the dominant faith in American society, has extended far beyond church pews into the wider culture. Yet, at the same time, Christians in the United States have disagreed sharply about the meaning of their shared tradition, and, divided by denominational affiliation, race, and ethnicity, they have taken stances on every side of contested public issues from slavery to women's rights. This volume of twenty-two original essays, contributed by a group of prominent thinkers in American religious studies, provides a sophisticated understanding of both the diversity and the alliances among Christianities in the United States and the influences that have shaped churches and the nation in reciprocal ways. American Christianities explores this paradoxical dynamic of dominance and diversity that are the true marks of a faith too often perceived as homogeneous and monolithic. Contributors: Catherine L. Albanese, University of California, Santa Barbara James B. Bennett, Santa Clara University Edith Blumhofer, Wheaton College Ann Braude, Harvard Divinity School Catherine A. Brekus, University of Chicago Divinity School Kristina Bross, Purdue University Rebecca L. Davis, University of Delaware Curtis J. Evans, University of Chicago Divinity School Tracy Fessenden, Arizona State University Kathleen Flake, Vanderbilt University Divinity School W. Clark Gilpin, University of Chicago Divinity School Stewart M. Hoover, University of Colorado at Boulder Jeanne Halgren Kilde, University of Minnesota David W. Kling, University of Miami Timothy S. Lee, Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University Dan McKanan, Harvard Divinity School Michael D. McNally, Carleton College Mark A. Noll, University of Notre Dame Jon Pahl, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia Sally M. Promey, Yale University Jon H. Roberts, Boston University Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University

Eleanor Marx

A Life
Author: Rachel Holmes
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408843234
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 528
View: 9479
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Unrestrained by convention, lion-hearted and free, Eleanor Marx (1855-98) was an exceptional woman. Hers was the first English translation of Flaubert's Mme Bovary. She pioneered the theatre of Henrik Ibsen. She was the first woman to lead the British dock workers' and gas workers' trades unions. For years she worked tirelessly for her father, Karl Marx, as personal secretary and researcher. Later she edited many of his key political works, and laid the foundations for his biography. But foremost among her achievements was her pioneering feminism. For her, sexual equality was a necessary precondition for a just society. Drawing strength from her family and their wide circle, including Friedrich Engels and Wilhelm Liebknecht, Eleanor Marx set out into the world to make a difference ? her favourite motto: 'Go ahead!' With her closest friends - among them, Olive Schreiner, Havelock Ellis, George Bernard Shaw, Will Thorne and William Morris - she was at the epicentre of British socialism. She was also the only Marx to claim her Jewishness. But her life contained a deep sadness: she loved a faithless and dishonest man, the academic, actor and would-be playwright Edward Aveling. Yet despite the unhappiness he brought her, Eleanor Marx never wavered in her political life, ceaselessly campaigning and organising until her untimely end, which ? with its letters, legacies, secrets and hidden paternity ? reads in part like a novel by Wilkie Collins, and in part like the modern tragedy it was. Rachel Holmes has gone back to original sources to tell the story of the woman who did more than any other to transform British politics in the nineteenth century, who was unafraid to live her contradictions.