Storming Caesars Palace

How Black Mothers Fought Their Own War on Poverty
Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807050323
Category: Political Science
Page: 368
View: 9795
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It was a spring day on the Las Vegas strip in 1971 when Ruby Duncan, a former cotton picker turned hotel maid, the mother of seven, led a procession. Followed by an angry army of welfare mothers, they stormed the casino hotel Caesars Palace to protest Nevada’s decision to terminate their benefits. The demonstrations went on for weeks, garnering the protesters and their cause national attention. Las Vegas felt the pinch; tourism was cut by half. Ultimately, a federal judge ruled to reinstate benefits. It was a victory for welfare rights advocates across the country. In Storming Caesars Palace, historian Annelise Orleck tells the compelling story of how a group of welfare mothers and their supporters built one of this country’s most successful antipoverty programs. Declaring that “we can do it and do it better” these women proved that poor mothers are the real experts on poverty. In 1972 they founded Operation Life, which was responsible for all kinds of firsts for the poor in Las Vegas—the first library, medical center, daycare center, job training, and senior citizen housing. By the late 1970s, Operation Life was bringing millions of dollars into the community each year. And these women were influential in Washington, D.C.—respected and listened to by the likes of Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Ted Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter. Ultimately, in the 1980s, Ruby Duncan and her band of reformers lost their funding with the country’s move toward conservatism. But the story of their incredible struggles and triumphs still stands as an important lesson about what can be achieved when those on welfare chart their own course.

Storming Caesar's Palace

How Black Mothers Fought Their Own War on Poverty
Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807097217
Category: Social Science
Page: 376
View: 4419
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The inspirational and little-known story of welfare mothers in Las Vegas, America's Sin City, who crafted an original response to poverty-from the ground up In Storming Caesars Palace, historian Annelise Orleck tells the compelling story of how a group of welfare mothers built one of this country's most successful antipoverty programs. Declaring "We can do it and do it better," these women proved that poor mothers are the real experts on poverty. In 1972 they founded Operation Life, which was responsible for many firsts for the poor in Las Vegas-the first library, medical center, daycare center, job training, and senior citizen housing. By the late 1970s, Operation Life was bringing millions of dollars into the community. These women became influential in Washington, DC-respected and listened to by political heavyweights such as Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Ted Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter. Though they lost their funding with the country's move toward conservatism in the 1980s, their struggles and phenomenal triumphs still stand as a critical lesson about what can be achieved when those on welfare chart their own course.

Storming Caesar's Palace

How Black Mothers Fought Their Own War on Poverty
Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807050318
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 8837
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It was a spring day on the Las Vegas strip in 1971 when Ruby Duncan, a former cotton picker turned hotel maid, the mother of seven, led a procession. Followed by an angry army of welfare mothers, they stormed the casino hotel Caesars Palace to protest Nevada’s decision to terminate their benefits. The demonstrations went on for weeks, garnering the protesters and their cause national attention. Las Vegas felt the pinch; tourism was cut by half. Ultimately, a federal judge ruled to reinstate benefits. It was a victory for welfare rights advocates across the country.In Storming Caesars Palace, historian Annelise Orleck tells the compelling story of how a group of welfare mothers and their supporters built one of this country’s most successful antipoverty programs. Declaring that "we can do it and do it better" these women proved that poor mothers are the real experts on poverty. In 1972 they founded Operation Life, which was responsible for all kinds of firsts for the poor in Las Vegas--the first library, medical center, daycare center, job training, and senior citizen housing. By the late 1970s, Operation Life was bringing millions of dollars into the community each year. And these women were influential in Washington, D.C.--respected and listened to by the likes of Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Ted Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter.Ultimately, in the 1980s, Ruby Duncan and her band of reformers lost their funding with the country’s move toward conservatism. But the story of their incredible struggles and triumphs still stands as an important lesson about what can be achieved when those on welfare chart their own course.

We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now

The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages
Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807081779
Category: HISTORY
Page: 288
View: 529
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"The story of low-wage workers rising up around the world to demand respect and a living wage. We Are All Fast Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages traces the evolution of a new global labor movement sparked and sustained by low-wage workers from Manila to Manhattan, from Baja California to Bangladesh, from Capetown to Cambodia. This is an up close and personal look at globalization and its costs, as seen through the eyes and told whenever possible through the words of low-wage workers themselves: the berry pickers and small farmers, fast food servers, retail cashiers, garment workers, hotel housekeepers, home health care aides, airport workers and adjunct professors who are fighting for respect, safety and a living wage. The result of 140 interviews by award-winning historian Annelise Orleck, and with original photographs by Liz Cooke, this is a powerful look at neo-liberalism and its damages, a story of resistance and rebellion, a reflection on hope and change as it rises from the bottom up"--

The War on Poverty

A New Grassroots History, 1964-1980
Author: Annelise Orleck,Lisa Gayle Hazirjian
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820331015
Category: History
Page: 503
View: 4539
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Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty has long been portrayed as the most potent symbol of all that is wrong with big government. Conservatives deride the War on Poverty for corruption and the creation of “poverty pimps,” and even liberals carefully distance themselves from it. Examining the long War on Poverty from the 1960s onward, this book makes a controversial argument that the programs were in many ways a success, reducing poverty rates and weaving a social safety net that has proven as enduring as programs that came out of the New Deal. The War on Poverty also transformed American politics from the grass roots up, mobilizing poor people across the nation. Blacks in crumbling cities, rural whites in Appalachia, Cherokees in Oklahoma, Puerto Ricans in the Bronx, migrant Mexican farmworkers, and Chinese immigrants from New York to California built social programs based on Johnson's vision of a greater, more just society. Contributors to this volume chronicle these vibrant and largely unknown histories while not shying away from the flaws and failings of the movement—including inadequate funding, co-optation by local political elites, and blindness to the reality that mothers and their children made up most of the poor. In the twenty-first century, when one in seven Americans receives food stamps and community health centers are the largest primary care system in the nation, the War on Poverty is as relevant as ever. This book helps us to understand the turbulent era out of which it emerged and why it remains so controversial to this day.

Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945


Author: Beth Tompkins Bates
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807875360
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 4913
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Between World War I and World War II, African Americans' quest for civil rights took on a more aggressive character as a new group of black activists challenged the politics of civility traditionally embraced by old-guard leaders in favor of a more forceful protest strategy. Beth Tompkins Bates traces the rise of this new protest politics--which was grounded in making demands and backing them up with collective action--by focusing on the struggle of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) to form a union in Chicago, headquarters of the Pullman Company. Bates shows how the BSCP overcame initial opposition from most of Chicago's black leaders by linking its union message with the broader social movement for racial equality. As members of BSCP protest networks mobilized the black community around the quest for manhood rights and economic freedom, they broke down resistance to organized labor even as they expanded the boundaries of citizenship to include equal economic opportunity. By the mid-1930s, BSCP protest networks gained platforms at the national level, fusing Brotherhood activities first with those of the National Negro Congress and later with the March on Washington Movement. Lessons learned during this era guided the next generation of activists, who carried the black freedom struggle forward after World War II.

A Fabric of Defeat

The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948
Author: Bryant Simon
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807864494
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 7960
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In this book, Bryant Simon brings to life the politics of white South Carolina millhands during the first half of the twentieth century. His revealing and moving account explores how this group of southern laborers thought about and participated in politics and public power. Taking a broad view of politics, Simon looks at laborers as they engaged in political activity in many venues--at the polling station, on front porches, and on the shop floor--and examines their political involvement at the local, state, and national levels. He describes the campaign styles and rhetoric of such politicians as Coleman Blease and Olin Johnston (himself a former millhand), who eagerly sought the workers' votes. He draws a detailed picture of mill workers casting ballots, carrying placards, marching on the state capital, writing to lawmakers, and picketing factories. These millhands' politics reflected their public and private thoughts about whiteness and blackness, war and the New Deal, democracy and justice, gender and sexuality, class relations and consumption. Ultimately, the people depicted here are neither romanticized nor dismissed as the stereotypically racist and uneducated "rednecks" found in many accounts of southern politics. Southern workers understood the political and social forces that shaped their lives, argues Simon, and they developed complex political strategies to deal with those forces.

The Queer Sixties


Author: Patricia Juliana Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136683682
Category: Art
Page: 300
View: 4889
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The Queer Sixties assembles an impressive group of cultural critics to go against the grain of 1960s studies, and proposes new and different ways of the last decade before the closet doors swung open. Imbued with the zeitgeist of the 60s, this playful and powerful collection rescues the persistence of the queer imaginary.

Spirit of Rebellion

Labor and Religion in the New Cotton South
Author: Jarod Roll
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252077032
Category: History
Page: 266
View: 4429
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'Spirit of Rebellion' documents an alternative tradition of American protest by linking working-class political movements to grassroots religious revivals. It reveals how ordinary rural citizens in the south used available resources and their shared faith to defend their agrarian livlihoods amid political and economic upheaval.

Sexual Reckonings


Author: Susan K. Cahn
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674029143
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 3848
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Sexual Reckonings is the fascinating tale of adolescent girls coming of age in the South during the most explosive decades for the region. Focusing on the period from 1920 to 1960, Susan Cahn reveals how both the life of the South and the meaning of adolescence underwent enormous political, economic, and social shifts.

Hine Sight

Black Women and the Re-construction of American History
Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253211248
Category: History
Page: 290
View: 4256
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"The history of African American women has become an important topic in the intellectual life of this country in the last fifteen years; and Darlene Clark Hine has been one of those most responsible for bringing the subject to its current level of importance." —from the Foreword by John Hope Franklin "In this absolutely needed collection of essays by one of the leading American historians of our generation, the richly intertwined community-making and self-making that shaped the historical experience of African American women shines out like a beacon." —Susan M. Reverby, Luella LaMer Associate Professor for Women's Studies, Wellesley College

The Battle for Welfare Rights

Politics and Poverty in Modern America
Author: Felicia Ann Kornbluh
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812240054
Category: Political Science
Page: 287
View: 4485
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"This is the most sophisticated study of welfare rights organizing to date. It engages with grassroots and high politics, social history and social thought. . . . While other books focus on ideas, structures, movement history, or poor women, Kornbluh does it all with insight and verve."--Eileen Boris, University of California, Santa Barbara

Casino Women

Courage in Unexpected Places
Author: Susan Chandler,Jill B. Jones
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080146269X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 240
View: 2389
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Based on extended interviews with maids, cocktail waitresses, cooks, laundry workers, dealers, pit bosses, and vice presidents, Casino Women is a pioneering look at the female face of corporate gaming.

Rethinking American Women's Activism


Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135089051
Category: History
Page: 244
View: 2878
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In this enthralling narrative, Annelise Orleck chronicles the history of the American women's movement from the nineteenth century to the present. Starting with an incisive introduction that calls for a reconceptualization of American feminist history to encompass multiple streams of women's activism, she weaves the personal with the political, vividly evoking the events and people who participated in our era's most far-reaching social revolutions. In short, thematic chapters, Orleck enables readers to understand the impact of women's activism, and highlights how feminism has flourished through much of the past century within social movements that have too often been treated as completely separate. Showing that women’s activism has taken many forms, has intersected with issues of class and race, and has continued during periods of backlash, Rethinking American Women’s Activism is a perfect introduction to the subject for anyone interested in women’s history and social movements.

Caring for America

Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State
Author: Eileen Boris,Jennifer Klein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199939055
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 447
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In this sweeping narrative history from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America rethinks both the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work and chronicles how home care workers eventually became one of the most vibrant forces in the American labor movement. Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein demonstrate the ways in which law and social policy made home care a low-waged job that was stigmatized as welfare and relegated to the bottom of the medical hierarchy. For decades, these front-line caregivers labored in the shadows of a welfare state that shaped the conditions of the occupation. Disparate, often chaotic programs for home care, which allowed needy, elderly, and disabled people to avoid institutionalization, historically paid poverty wages to the African American and immigrant women who constituted the majority of the labor force. Yet policymakers and welfare administrators linked discourses of dependence and independence-claiming that such jobs would end clients' and workers' "dependence" on the state and provide a ticket to economic independence. The history of home care illuminates the fractured evolution of the modern American welfare state since the New Deal and its race, gender, and class fissures. It reveals why there is no adequate long-term care in America. Caring for America is much more than a history of social policy, however; it is also about a powerful contemporary social movement. At the front and center of the narrative are the workers-poor women of color-who have challenged the racial, social, and economic stigmas embedded in the system. Caring for America traces the intertwined, sometimes conflicting search of care providers and receivers for dignity, self-determination, and security. It highlights the senior citizen and independent living movements; the civil rights organizing of women on welfare and domestic workers; the battles of public sector unions; and the unionization of health and service workers. It rethinks the strategies of the U.S. labor movement in terms of a growing care work economy. Finally, it makes a powerful argument that care is a basic right for all and that care work merits a living wage.

Women and Social Protest


Author: Guida West,Rhoda Lois Blumberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195065176
Category: Political Science
Page: 406
View: 2829
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Drawing on the work of sociologists, political scientists, historians, and experts in women's studies, Women and Social Protest explores four types of social protest--economic; racial, ethnic, and nationalistic; social nuturing and humanistic; and women's rights--considering a wealth of data from different eras and case studies from around the world. One of the first books to examine this important topic in detail, this book is an invaluable contribution to the expanding field of social political theory.

Common Sense and a Little Fire, Second Edition

Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965
Author: Annelise Orleck
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469635925
Category: Social Science
Page: 424
View: 6631
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Over twenty years after its initial publication, Annelise Orleck's Common Sense and a Little Fire continues to resonate with its harrowing story of activism, labor, and women's history. Orleck traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely made more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe to the radical ferment of New York's Lower East Side and the gaslit tenements where young workers studied together. Orleck paints a compelling picture of housewives' food and rent protests, of grim conditions in the garment shops, of factory-floor friendships that laid the basis for a mass uprising of young women garment workers, and of the impassioned rallies working women organized for suffrage. Featuring a new preface by the author, this new edition reasserts itself as a pivotal text in twentieth-century labor history.

Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950


Author: Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393335321
Category: History
Page: 646
View: 5582
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A history of the effort to promote social justice throughout the American South in the decades prior to the civil rights movement documents the contributions of people from all walks of life, in an account that places key events against a backdrop of national and global events. Reprint.

Race and the War on Poverty

From Watts to East L.A.
Author: Robert Bauman
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806185201
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 5128
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President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty did more than offer aid to needy Americans; in some cities, it also sparked both racial conflict and cooperation. Race and the War on Poverty examines the African American and Mexican American community organizations in Los Angeles that emerged to implement War on Poverty programs. It explores how organizers applied democratic vision and political savvy to community action, and how the ongoing African American, Chicano, and feminist movements in turn shaped the contours of the War on Poverty’s goals, programs, and cultural identity. Robert Bauman describes how the Watts riots of 1965 accelerated the creation of a black community-controlled agency, the Watts Labor Community Action Committee. The example of the WLCAC, combined with a burgeoning Chicano movement, inspired Mexican Americans to create The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU) and the Chicana Service Action Center. Bauman explores the connections that wove together the War on Poverty, the Watts revolt, and local movements in ways that empowered the participants economically, culturally, and politically. Although heated battles over race and other cultural issues sometimes derailed the programs, these organizations produced lasting positive effects for the communities they touched. Despite Nixon-era budget cuts and the nation’s turn toward conservatism, the War on Poverty continues to be fought today as these agencies embrace the changing politics, economics, and demographics of Los Angeles. Race and the War on Poverty shows how the struggle to end poverty evolved in ways that would have surprised its planners, supporters, and detractors—and that what began as a grand vision at the national level continues to thrive on the streets of the community.

Community Based Corrections


Author: Leanne Fiftal Alarid
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1305633725
Category: Education
Page: 448
View: 2804
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Objective, comprehensive, and up-to-date, the eleventh edition of best-selling COMMUNITY-BASED CORRECTIONS provides an excellent introduction to the theory, procedures, evidence-based practices, and personnel involved in community-based corrections. Students learn about the supervision techniques and treatment programs that constitute alternatives to incarceration, and which are designed to meet the level of risk and needs of each individual. These include probation, parole, electronic monitoring, house arrest, residential facilities, restitution, fines, and other options. Coverage of theories related to community correctional goals includes discussion of specific deterrence; rehabilitation through risk, needs, and responsivity; and restorative justice. Input from professionals in the field gives students invaluable insight into real-world practice. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.