Sugar

The World Corrupted, from Slavery to Obesity
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Constable
ISBN: 9781472138095
Category:
Page: 352
View: 3688
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The story of sugar, and of mankind's desire for sweetness in food and drink is a compelling, though confusing story. It is also an historical story. The story of mankind's love of sweetness - the need to consume honey, cane sugar, beet sugar and chemical sweeteners - has important historical origins. To take a simple example, two centuries ago, cane sugar was vital to the burgeoning European domestic and colonial economies. For all its recent origins, today's obesity epidemic - if that is what it is - did not emerge overnight, but instead evolved from a complexity of historical forces which stretch back centuries. We can only fully understand this modern problem, by coming to terms with its genesis and history: and we need to consider the historical relationship between society and sweetness over a long historical span. This book seeks to do just that: to tell the story of how the consumption of sugar - the addition of sugar to food and drink - became a fundamental and increasingly troublesome feature of modern life. Walvin's book is the heir to Sidney Mintz's Sweetness and Power, a brilliant sociological account, but now thirty years old. In addition, the problem of sugar, and the consequent intellectual and political debate about the role of sugar, has been totally transformed in the years since that book's publication.

Sugar: A Bittersweet History


Author: Elizabeth Abbott
Publisher: The Overlook Press
ISBN: 1590207726
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 3282
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Sugar: A Bittersweet History is a compelling and surprising look at the sweet commodity, from how it Africanized the cane fields of the Caribbean to how it fuelled the Industrial Revolution and jumpstarted the fast-food revolution. The book explores the hidden stories behind this sweet product, revealing how powerful American interests deposed Queen Lili'uokalani of Hawaii, how Hitler tried to ensure a steady supply of beet sugar when enemies threatened to cut off Germany's supply of overseas cane sugar, and how South Africa established a domestic ethanol industry in the wake of anti-apartheid sugar embargos. The book follows the history of sugar to the present day, showing how sugar made eating on the run socially acceptable and played an integral role in today's fast food culture and obesity epidemic. Impressively researched and commandingly written, Sugar will forever change perceptions of this sweet treat.

Sweetness and Power

The Place of Sugar in Modern History
Author: Sidney W. Mintz
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101666641
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 1906
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A fascinating persuasive history of how sugar has shaped the world, from European colonies to our modern diets In this eye-opening study, Sidney Mintz shows how Europeans and Americans transformed sugar from a rare foreign luxury to a commonplace necessity of modern life, and how it changed the history of capitalism and industry. He discusses the production and consumption of sugar, and reveals how closely interwoven are sugar's origins as a "slave" crop grown in Europe's tropical colonies with is use first as an extravagant luxury for the aristocracy, then as a staple of the diet of the new industrial proletariat. Finally, he considers how sugar has altered work patterns, eating habits, and our diet in modern times. "Like sugar, Mintz is persuasive, and his detailed history is a real treat." -San Francisco Chronicle

The Zong

A Massacre, the Law and the End of Slavery
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300180756
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 269
View: 2560
DOWNLOAD NOW »
On November 29, 1781, Captain Collingwood of the British ship "Zong" commanded his crew to throw overboard one-third of his cargo: a shipment of Africans bound for slavery in America. The captain believed his ship was off course, and he feared there was not enough drinking water to last until landfall. This book is the first to examine in detail the deplorable killings on the "Zong," the lawsuit that ensued, how the murder of 132 slaves affected debates about slavery, and the way we remember the infamous "Zong" today. Historian James Walvin explores all aspects of the "Zong"'s voyage and the subsequent trial--a case brought to court not for the murder of the slaves but as a suit against the insurers who denied the owners' claim that their "cargo" had been necessarily jettisoned. The scandalous case prompted wide debate and fueled Britain's awakening abolition movement. Without the episode of the "Zong," Walvin contends, the process of ending the slave trade would have taken an entirely different moral and political trajectory. He concludes with a fascinating discussion of how the case of the "Zong," though unique in the history of slave ships, has come to be understood as typical of life on all such ships.

Atlas of Slavery


Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317874161
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 496
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Slavery transformed Africa, Europe and the Americas and hugely-enhanced the well-being of the West but the subject of slavery can be hard to understand because of its huge geographic and chronological span. This book uses a unique atlas format to present the story of slavery, explaining its historical importance and making this complex story and its geographical setting easy to understand.

Slavery in Small Things

Slavery and Modern Cultural Habits
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119166209
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 1090
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Slavery in Small Things: Slavery and Modern Cultural Habits isthe first book to explore the long-range cultural legacy of slavery through commonplace daily objects. Offers a new and original approach to the history of slavery by an acknowledged expert on the topic Traces the relationship between slavery and modern cultural habits through an analysis of commonplace objects that include sugar, tobacco, tea, maps, portraiture, print, and more Represents the only study that utilizes common objects to illustrate the cultural impact and legacy of the Atlantic slave trade Makes the topic of slavery accessible to a wider public audience

Sugar Changed the World

A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science
Author: Marc Aronson,Marina Tamar Budhos
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780618574926
Category: Cooking
Page: 166
View: 6308
DOWNLOAD NOW »
When an award-winning husband-and-wife team discovered that they each had sugar in their family histories, they were inspired to trace the panoramic story of the sweet substance and its important role in shaping world history. Includes songs, oral histories, maps, a timeline, source notes and over 80 archival illustrations.

Bittersweet

The Story of Sugar
Author: Peter Macinnis
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 1741766559
Category: Science
Page: 216
View: 1072
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"Lively and entertaining: a splendid saga for the general reader." -Kirkus Reviews "Covers a tremendous amount of information. . . . [A] lighthearted but serious look." -Choice A chronicle of the discovery and development of sugar around the world.

The People's Game

The History of Football Revisited
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 178057777X
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 3795
DOWNLOAD NOW »
At the beginning of the twentieth century, soccer was widely accepted as the most popular game in the western world. In the space of a few decades, it had become the best-supported team game in Britain, watched and played by more boys and men than any other sport. Yet here was a game with strong traditional folk roots and a history that stretched back to the late Middle Ages. In the course of the nineteenth century, football was transformed, mainly within the British public schools, to become the codified and disciplined game of urban working men. The passion for the game spread from one town to another, a passion that, though familiar today, was new in the years after 1870. Thereafter, the game rapidly spread to much of the world: to Europe, South America and a host of other societies. This book tells the story of the rise of this remarkable British game and the way it became the game of the masses across the world. In the wealth of literature about football published in recent years, no other book provides so concise and colourful an account as The People's Game.

Making the Black Atlantic

Britain and the African Diaspora
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474292909
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 3096
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The British role in the shaping of the African diaspora was central: the British carried more Africans across the Atlantic than any other nation and their colonial settlements in the Caribbean and North America absorbed vast numbers of Africans. The crops produced by those slaves helped to lay the foundations for Western material well-being, and their associated cultural habits helped to shape key areas of Western sociability that survive to this day. Britain was also central in the drive to end slavery, in her own possessions and elsewhere in the world. Making the Black Atlantic presents a coherent story of Britain's role in the African diaspora, its origins, progress, and transformation.

The Slave Trade


Author: James Walvin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500289174
Category: History
Page: 144
View: 2556
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Chronicles the Atlantic slave trade, including discussions on slave trading between European and African countries before 1700, the products made using slave labor, plantation life, the abolitionist movement, and legacy.

Milk!

A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1632863847
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 3039
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestselling Cod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization. Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.

Pepper: A History of the World's Most Influential Spice


Author: Marjorie Shaffer
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250021006
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 3867
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Filled with anecdotes and fascinating information, "a spicy read indeed." (Mark Pendergrast, author of Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How it Transformed the World) The perfect companion to Mark Kurlansky's Salt: A World History, Pepper illuminates the rich history of pepper for a popular audience. Vivid and entertaining, it describes the part pepper played in bringing the Europeans, and later the Americans, to Asia and details the fascinating encounters they had there. As Mark Pendergrast, author of Uncommon Grounds, said, "After reading Marjorie Shaffer's Pepper, you'll reconsider the significance of that grinder or shaker on your dining room table. The pursuit of this wizened berry with the bite changed history in ways you've never dreamed, involving extraordinary voyages, international trade, exotic locales, exploitation, brutality, disease, extinctions, and rebellions, and featuring a set of remarkable characters." From the abundance of wildlife on the islands of the Indian Ocean, which the Europeans used as stepping stones to India and the East Indies, to colorful accounts of the sultan of Banda Aceh entertaining his European visitors with great banquets and elephant fights, this fascinating book reveals the often surprising story behind one of mankind's most common spices.

Sweet and Low

A Family Story
Author: Rich Cohen
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466806842
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6495
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Sweet and Low is the amazing, bittersweet, hilarious story of an American family and its patriarch, a short-order cook named Ben Eisenstadt who, in the years after World War II, invented the sugar packet and Sweet'N Low, converting his Brooklyn cafeteria into a factory and amassing the great fortune that would destroy his family. It is also the story of immigrants to the New World, sugar, saccharine, obesity, and the health and diet craze, played out across countries and generations but also within the life of a single family, as the fortune and the factory passed from generation to generation. The author, Rich Cohen, a grandson (disinherited, and thus set free, along with his mother and siblings), has sought the truth of this rancorous, colorful history, mining thousands of pages of court documents accumulated in the long and sometimes corrupt life of the factor, and conducting interviews with members of his extended family. Along the way, the forty-year family battle over the fortune moves into its titanic phase, with the money and legacy up for grabs. Sweet and Low is the story of this struggle, a strange comic farce of machinations and double dealings, and of an extraordinary family and its fight for the American dream.

A Thirst for Empire

How Tea Shaped the Modern World
Author: Erika Rappaport
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884853
Category: History
Page: 568
View: 7895
DOWNLOAD NOW »
How the global tea industry influenced the international economy and the rise of mass consumerism Tea has been one of the most popular commodities in the world. Over centuries, profits from its growth and sales funded wars and fueled colonization, and its cultivation brought about massive changes—in land use, labor systems, market practices, and social hierarchies—the effects of which are with us even today. A Thirst for Empire takes a vast and in depth historical look at how men and women—through the tea industry in Europe, Asia, North America, and Africa—transformed global tastes and habits and in the process created our modern consumer society. As Erika Rappaport shows, between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries the boundaries of the tea industry and the British Empire overlapped but were never identical, and she highlights the economic, political, and cultural forces that enabled the British Empire to dominate—but never entirely control—the worldwide production, trade, and consumption of tea. Rappaport delves into how Europeans adopted, appropriated, and altered Chinese tea culture to build a widespread demand for tea in Britain and other global markets and a plantation-based economy in South Asia and Africa. Tea was among the earliest colonial industries in which merchants, planters, promoters, and retailers used imperial resources to pay for global advertising and political lobbying. The commercial model that tea inspired still exists and is vital for understanding how politics and publicity influence the international economy. An expansive and original global history of imperial tea, A Thirst for Empire demonstrates the ways that this fluid and powerful enterprise helped shape the contemporary world.

Black Ivory

Slavery in the British Empire
Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631229605
Category: History
Page: 346
View: 1057
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The terrible story of African slavery in the British colonies of the West Indies and North America is told with clarity and compassion in this classic history.

Bananas

How the United Fruit Company Shaped the World
Author: Peter Chapman
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 0802192009
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 252
View: 346
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this compelling history of the United Fruit Company, Financial Times writer Peter Chapman weaves a dramatic tale of big business, deceit, and violence, exploring the origins of arguably one of the most controversial global corporations ever, and the ways in which their pioneering example set the precedent for the institutionalized greed of today’s multinational companies. The story has its source in United Fruit’s nineteenth-century beginnings in the jungles of Costa Rica. What follows is a damning examination of the company’s policies: from the marketing of the banana as the first fast food, to the company’s involvement in an invasion of Honduras, a massacre in Colombia, and a bloody coup in Guatemala. Along the way the company fostered covert links with U.S. power brokers such as Richard Nixon and CIA operative Howard Hunt, manipulated the press in new, and stoked the revolutionary ire of Che Guevara and Fidel Castro. From the exploited banana republics of Central America to the concrete jungle of New York City, Peter Chapman’s Bananas is a lively and insightful cultural history of the coveted yellow fruit, as well as a gripping narrative about the infamous rise and fall of the United Fruit Company.

Magic Bean

The Rise of Soy in America
Author: Matthew Roth
Publisher: Culture America (Hardcover)
ISBN: 9780700626335
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 553
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Magic Bean traces the paths by which the soybean--as a crop, food, and idea--made its way into American farming, bodies, and culture over the course of the twentieth century. Along the way, it shows that its coming was by no means predictable, even as its consequences have been important.

Sugar

A Global History
Author: Andrew F. Smith
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1780234783
Category: Cooking
Page: 128
View: 9352
DOWNLOAD NOW »
It’s no surprise that sugar has been on our minds for millennia. First cultivated in New Guinea around 8,000 B.C.E., this addictive sweetener has since come to dominate our appetites—whether in candy, desserts, soft drinks, or even pasta sauces—for better and for worse. In this book, Andrew F. Smith offers a fascinating history of this simultaneously beloved and reviled ingredient, holding its incredible value as a global commodity up against its darker legacies of slavery and widespread obesity. As Smith demonstrates, sugar’s past is chockfull of determined adventurers: relentless sugar barons and plantation owners who worked alongside plant breeders, food processors, distributors, and politicians to build a business based on our cravings. Exploring both the sugarcane and sugar beet industries, he tells story after story of those who have made fortunes and those who have met demise all because of sugar’s simple but profound hold on our palates. Delightful and surprisingly action-packed, this book offers a layered and definitive tale of sugar and the many people who have been caught in its spell—from barons to slaves, from chefs to the countless among us born with that insatiable devil, the sweet tooth.

Britain's Slave Empire


Author: James Walvin
Publisher: Tempus Pub Limited
ISBN: 9780752444277
Category: History
Page: 212
View: 6215
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The history of how the Africa Trade formed the backbone of the British Empire. The British Empire carried more Africans into bondage across the Americas than any other nation.