The Birth of the Penitentiary in Latin America

Essays on Criminology, Prison Reform, and Social Control, 1830-1940
Author: Ricardo D. Salvatore,Carlos Aguirre
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292787634
Category: Social Science
Page: 303
View: 4152
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Opening a new area in Latin American studies, The Birth of the Penitentiary in Latin America showcases the most recent historical outlooks on prison reform and criminology in the Latin American context. The essays in this collection shed new light on the discourse and practice of prison reform, the interpretive shifts induced by the spread of criminological science, and the links between them and competing discourses about class, race, nation, and gender. The book shows how the seemingly clear redemptive purpose of the penitentiary project was eventually contradicted by conflicting views about imprisonment, the pervasiveness of traditional forms of repression and control, and resistance from the lower classes. The essays are unified by their attempt to view the penitentiary (as well as the variety of representations conveyed by the different reform movements favoring its adoption) as an interpretive moment, revealing of the ideology, class fractures, and contradictory nature of modernity in Latin America. As such, the book should be of interest not only to scholars concerned with criminal justice history, but also to a wide range of readers interested in modernization, social identities, and the discursive articulation of social conflict. The collection also offers an up-to-date sampling of new historical approaches to the study of criminal justice history, illuminates crucial aspects of the Latin American modernization process, and contrasts the Latin American cases with the better known European and North American experiences with prison reform.

The Birth of the Penitentiary in Latin America

Essays on Criminology, Prison Reform, and Social Control, 1830-1940
Author: Ricardo D. Salvatore,Carlos Aguirre
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292787634
Category: Social Science
Page: 303
View: 1770
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Opening a new area in Latin American studies, The Birth of the Penitentiary in Latin America showcases the most recent historical outlooks on prison reform and criminology in the Latin American context. The essays in this collection shed new light on the discourse and practice of prison reform, the interpretive shifts induced by the spread of criminological science, and the links between them and competing discourses about class, race, nation, and gender. The book shows how the seemingly clear redemptive purpose of the penitentiary project was eventually contradicted by conflicting views about imprisonment, the pervasiveness of traditional forms of repression and control, and resistance from the lower classes. The essays are unified by their attempt to view the penitentiary (as well as the variety of representations conveyed by the different reform movements favoring its adoption) as an interpretive moment, revealing of the ideology, class fractures, and contradictory nature of modernity in Latin America. As such, the book should be of interest not only to scholars concerned with criminal justice history, but also to a wide range of readers interested in modernization, social identities, and the discursive articulation of social conflict. The collection also offers an up-to-date sampling of new historical approaches to the study of criminal justice history, illuminates crucial aspects of the Latin American modernization process, and contrasts the Latin American cases with the better known European and North American experiences with prison reform.

Afterlives of Confinement

Spatial Transitions in Postdictatorship Latin America
Author: Susana Draper
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822978067
Category: Architecture
Page: 249
View: 5535
DOWNLOAD NOW »
During the age of dictatorships, Latin American prisons became a symbol for the vanquishing of political opponents, many of whom were never seen again. In the post-dictatorship era of the 1990s, a number of these prisons were repurposed into shopping malls, museums, and memorials. Susana Draper uses the phenomenon of the "opening" of prisons and detention centers to begin a dialog on conceptualizations of democracy and freedom in post-dictatorship Latin America. Focusing on the Southern Cone nations of Uruguay, Chile, and Argentina, Draper examines key works in architecture, film, and literature to peel away the veiled continuity of dictatorial power structures in ensuing consumer cultures. The afterlife of prisons became an important tool in the "forgetting" of past politics, while also serving as a reminder to citizens of the liberties they now enjoyed. In Draper's analysis, these symbols led the populace to believe they had attained freedom, although they had only witnessed the veneer of democracy--in the ability to vote and consume. In selected literary works by Roberto Bolaño, Eleuterio Fernández Huidoboro, and Diamela Eltit and films by Alejandro Agresti and Marco Bechis, Draper finds further evidence of the emptiness and melancholy of underachieved goals in the afterlife of dictatorships. The social changes that did not occur, the inability to effectively mourn the losses of a now-hidden past, the homogenizing effects of market economies, and a yearning for the promises of true freedom are thematic currents underlying much of these texts. Draper's study of the manipulation of culture and consumerism under the guise of democracy will have powerful implications not only for Latin Americanists but also for those studying neoliberal transformations globally.

The Borders of Punishment

Migration, Citizenship, and Social Exclusion
Author: Katja Franko Aas,Mary Bosworth
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191648132
Category: Law
Page: 336
View: 5462
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Borders of Punishment: Migration, Citizenship, and Social Exclusion critically assesses the relationship between immigration control, citizenship, and criminal justice. It reflects on the theoretical and methodological challenges posed by mass mobility and its control and for the first time, sets out a particular sub-field within criminology, the criminology of mobility. Drawing together leading international scholars with newer researchers, the book systematically outlines why criminology and criminal justice should pay more attention to issues of immigration and border control. Contributors consider how 'traditional' criminal justice institutions such as the criminal law, police, and prisons are being shaped and altered by immigration, as well as examining novel forms of penality (such as deportation and detention facilities), which have until now seldom featured in criminological studies and textbooks. In so doing, the book demonstrates that mobility and its control are matters that ought to be central to any understanding of the criminal justice system. Phenomena such as the controversial use of immigration law for the purposes of the war on terror, closed detention centres, deportation, and border policing, raise in new ways some of the fundamental and enduring questions of criminal justice and criminology: What is punishment? What is crime? What should be the normative and legal foundation for criminalization, for police suspicion, for the exclusion from the community, and for the deprivation of freedom? And who is the subject of rights within a society and what is the relevance of citizenship to criminal justice?

City at the Center of the World

Space, History, and Modernity in Quito
Author: Ernesto Capello
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822977435
Category: History
Page: 290
View: 3752
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this original cultural history, Ernesto Capello analyzes the formation of memory, myth, and modernity through the eyes of Quito's diverse populations. By employing Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of chronotopes, Capello views the configuration of time and space in narratives that defined Quito's identity and its place in the world. To Capello, these tropes began to crystallize at the end of the nineteenth century, serving as a tool for distinct groups who laid claim to history for economic or political gain during the upheavals of modernism.

ILAS newsletter


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 7682
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Cultures of Confinement

A History of the Prison in Africa, Asia, and Latin America
Author: Frank Dikötter,Ian Brown
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501721267
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 1443
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Prisons are on the increase from the United States to China, as ever-larger proportions of humanity find themselves behind bars. While prisons now span the world, we know little about their history in global perspective. Rather than interpreting the prison's proliferation as the predictable result of globalization, Cultures of Confinement underlines the fact that the prison was never simply imposed by colonial powers or copied by elites eager to emulate the West, but was reinvented and transformed by a host of local factors, its success being dependent on its very flexibility. Complex cultural negotiations took place in encounters between different parts of the world, and rather than assigning a passive role to Latin America, Asia, and Africa, the authors of this book point out the acts of resistance or appropriation that altered the social practices associated with confinement. The prison, in short, was understood in culturally specific ways and reinvented in a variety of local contexts examined here for the first time in global perspective.

NACLA Report on the Americas


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Latin America
Page: N.A
View: 9277
DOWNLOAD NOW »


The Emancipation of Prisoners

A Socio-Historical Analysis of the Dutch Prison Experience
Author: Herman Franke
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 365
View: 9365
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Compared with most European countries, The Netherlands sends few of its convicted criminals to prison, and those who are imprisoned have more rights and better treatment than their European counterparts. In this seminal study, criminologist Herman Franke presents the 'Dutch case'. Examining imprisonment in The Netherlands from the end of the eighteenth century to the modern day, he gives a close historical and sociological analysis of the changing trends in the Dutch penal system, revealing the limitations of existing literature on the origins of imprisonment. He concludes that the work of Foucault, Ignatieff, Rothman and Rusch, and Kirchheimer fails to explain long-term developments that are typical of Western prison systems, and provides a sociological interpretation of these changes.

Punishment and Social Structure


Author: Georg Rusche,Otto Kirchheimer
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 9781412832526
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 5866
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Why are certain methods of punishment adopted or rejected in a given social situation? To what extent is the development of penal methods determined by basic social relations? The answers to these questions are complex, and go well beyond the thesis that institutionalized punishment is simply for the protection of society. While today's punishment of offenders often incorporates aspects of psychology, psychiatry, and sociology, at one time there was a more pronounced difference in criminal punishment based on class and economics. Punishment and Social Structure originated from an article written by Georg Rusche in 1933 entitled "Labor Market and Penal Sanction: Thoughts on the Sociology of Criminal Justice." Originally published in Germany by the Frankfurt Institute of Social Research, this article became the germ of a theory of criminology that laid the groundwork for all subsequent research in this area. Rusche and Kirchheimer look at crime from an historical perspective, and correlate methods of punishment with both temporal cultural values and economic conditions. The authors classify the history of crime into three primary eras: the early Middle Ages, in which penance and fines were the predominant modes of punishment; the later Middle Ages, in which harsh corporal punishment and capital punishment moved to the forefront; and the seventeenth century, in which the prison system was more fully developed. They also discuss more recent forms of penal practice, most notably under the constraints of a fascist state. The majority of the book was translated from German into English, and then reshaped by Rusche's co-author, Otto Kirchheimer, with whom Rusche actually had little discussion. While the main body of Punishment and Social Structure are Rusche's ideas, Kirchheimer was responsible for bringing the book more up-to-date to include the Nazi and fascist era. Punishment and Social Structure is a pioneering work that sets a paradigm for the study of crime and punishment.

The Hispanic American Historical Review


Author: James Alexander Robertson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Electronic journals
Page: N.A
View: 6784
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Includes "Bibliographical section".

List of Publications


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Latin America
Page: N.A
View: 6765
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Guide to International Legal Research


Author: George Washington University Law School International Law Review
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 3827
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Crime, Histoire & Sociétés


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Crime
Page: N.A
View: 4654
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Crime, Histoire Et Sociétés


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Criminal justice, Administration of
Page: N.A
View: 7460
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Radicals, Reformers, and Reactionaries

The Prisoner's Dilemma and the Collapse of Democracy in Latin America
Author: Youssef Cohen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226112718
Category: Political Science
Page: 200
View: 5720
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Latin American democracies of the sixties and seventies, most theories hold, collapsed because they had become incompatible with the structural requirements of capitalist development. In this groundbreaking application of game theory to political phenomena, Youssef Cohen argues that structural conditions in Latin American countries did not necessarily preclude the implementation of social and economic reforms within a democratic framework. Focusing on the experiences of Chile and Brazil, Cohen argues that what thwarted democratic reforms in Latin America was a classic case of prisoner's dilemma. Moderates on the left and the right knew the benefits of coming to a mutual agreement on socio-economic reforms. Yet each feared that, if it cooperated, the other side could gain by colluding with the radicals. Unwilling to take this risk, moderate groups in both countries splintered and joined the extremists. The resulting disorder opened the way for military control. Cohen further argues that, in general, structural explanations of political phenomena are inherently flawed; they incorrectly assume that beliefs, preferences, and actions are caused by social, political, and economic structures. One cannot explain political outcomes, Cohen argues, without treating beliefs and preferences as partly independent from structures, and as having a causal force in their own right.

Smoldering Ashes

Cuzco and the Creation of Republican Peru, 1780-1840
Author: Charles F. Walker
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 9780822322931
Category: Political Science
Page: 348
View: 3250
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In Smoldering Ashes Charles F. Walker interprets the end of Spanish domination in Peru and that country’s shaky transition to an autonomous republican state. Placing the indigenous population at the center of his analysis, Walker shows how the Indian peasants played a crucial and previously unacknowledged role in the battle against colonialism and in the political clashes of the early republican period. With its focus on Cuzco, the former capital of the Inca Empire, Smoldering Ashes highlights the promises and frustrations of a critical period whose long shadow remains cast on modern Peru. Peru’s Indian majority and non-Indian elite were both opposed to Spanish rule, and both groups participated in uprisings during the late colonial period. But, at the same time, seething tensions between the two groups were evident, and non-Indians feared a mass uprising. As Walker shows, this internal conflict shaped the many struggles to come, including the Tupac Amaru uprising and other Indian-based rebellions, the long War of Independence, the caudillo civil wars, and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation. Smoldering Ashes not only reinterprets these conflicts but also examines the debates that took place—in the courts, in the press, in taverns, and even during public festivities—over the place of Indians in the republic. In clear and elegant prose, Walker explores why the fate of the indigenous population, despite its participation in decades of anticolonial battles, was little improved by republican rule, as Indians were denied citizenship in the new nation—an unhappy legacy with which Peru still grapples. Informed by the notion of political culture and grounded in Walker’s archival research and knowledge of Peruvian and Latin American history, Smoldering Ashes will be essential reading for experts in Andean history, as well as scholars and students in the fields of nationalism, peasant and Native American studies, colonialism and postcolonialism, and state formation.

A history of prison and confinement in Africa


Author: Florence Bernault,Janet Lee Roitman
Publisher: African Writers Series
ISBN: 9780325071251
Category: History
Page: 287
View: 1900
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Over the last 30 years, a substantial literature on the history of American and European prisons has developed. This collection is among the first in English to construct a history of prisons in Africa. Topics include precolonial punishments, living conditions in prisons and mining camps, ethnic mapping, contemporary refugee camps, and the political use of prison from the era of the slave trade to the Rwandan genocide of 1994.

The cultural lives of capital punishment

comparative perspectives
Author: Austin Sarat,Christian Boulanger
Publisher: Stanford Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: 342
View: 8529
DOWNLOAD NOW »
How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity? After centuries during which capital punishment was a normal and self-evident part of criminal punishment, it has now taken on a life of its own in various arenas far beyond the limits of the penal sphere. In this volume, the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty, we need to know more about the "cultural lives"—past and present—of the state’s ultimate sanction. They undertake this “cultural voyage” comparatively—examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea—arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment “lives” or “dies” in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition. Contributors: Sangmin Bae Christian Boulanger Julia Eckert Agata Fijalkowski Evi Girling Virgil K.Y. Ho David T. Johnson Botagoz Kassymbekova Shai Lavi Jürgen Martschukat Alfred Oehlers Judith Randle Judith Mendelsohn Rood Austin Sarat Patrick Timmons Nicole Tarulevicz Louise Tyler

The Invention of International Crime

A Global Issue in the Making, 1881–1914
Author: P. Knepper
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230251129
Category: History
Page: 254
View: 1011
DOWNLOAD NOW »
We live in the age of international crime but when did it begin? This book examines the period when crime became an international issue (1881-1914), exploring issues such as 'world-shrinking' changes in transportation, communication and commerce, and concerns about alien criminality, white slave trading and anarchist outrages.