The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery


Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393080827
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 2224
DOWNLOAD NOW »
“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.

Der Historiker


Author: Elizabeth Kostova
Publisher: ebook Berlin Verlag
ISBN: 3827071437
Category: Fiction
Page: 832
View: 542
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Ein junges Mädchen findet in der Bibliothek ihres Vaters ein Konvolut mit vergilbten Briefen. Das Geheimnis um den Vater und das Schicksal der Mutter verbinden sich zu einem Drama, das weit in die Vergangenheit zurückreicht. Die Briefe fragen nach der Herkunft von Vlad dem Pfähler, dem Urbild der Dracula-Legende. Eine atemberaubende Suche in Klöstern, Bibliotheken und Archiven beginnt, bei der Grausamkeiten Draculas zutage treten, die sich bis heute fortsetzen ...

American War

Roman
Author: Omar El Akkad
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104908109
Category: Fiction
Page: 32
View: 2174
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Gleich hier die kostenlose XXL-Leseprobe lesen! »American War« - das Buch der Stunde. »Ein gewaltiger Roman«, schreibt die renommierteste Literaturkritikerin der USA, Michiko Kakutani. Ein Roman über den nächsten amerikanischen Bürgerkrieg und das dramatische Schicksal einer Familie. Was wird sein, wenn die erschütternde Realität der Gegenwart - Drohnenangriffe, Folter, Selbstmordattentate und die Folgen von Umweltkatastrophen - mit aller Gewalt in die USA zurückkehrt? Vor diesem Hintergrund entfaltet Omar El Akkad mit großer erzählerischer Kraft den dramatischen Kampf der jungen Sarat Chestnut, die beschließt, mit allen Mitteln für das Überleben zu kämpfen. »American War« ist in den USA ein literarisches Ereignis, das schon jetzt mit Cormac McCarthy »Die Straße« und Philip Roth »Verschwörung gegen Amerika« verglichen wird.

Our Fiery Trial

Abraham Lincoln, John Brown, and the Civil War Era
Author: Stephen B. Oates
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9780870233975
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 5089
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this collection of ten interrelated essays, Stephen B. Oates focuses on the American Civil War era and several of its leading figures. While arguing 'the need for unflinching realism and a humanistic approach in the study of the past, ' Oates critically examines alternative interpretive practices, particularly those serving polemical, political, or mythical standards.

Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction


Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: Amer Historical Assn
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 22
View: 1695
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The study and teaching of history unexpectedly emerged as the subject of intense public debate.

The War That Forged a Nation

Why the Civil War Still Matters
Author: James M. McPherson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199375798
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 6971
DOWNLOAD NOW »
More than 140 years ago, Mark Twain observed that the Civil War had "uprooted institutions that were centuries old, changed the politics of a people, transformed the social life of half the country, and wrought so profoundly upon the entire national character that the influence cannot be measured short of two or three generations." In fact, five generations have passed, and Americans are still trying to measure the influence of the immense fratricidal conflict that nearly tore the nation apart. In The War that Forged a Nation, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James M. McPherson considers why the Civil War remains so deeply embedded in our national psyche and identity. The drama and tragedy of the war, from its scope and size--an estimated death toll of 750,000, far more than the rest of the country's wars combined--to the nearly mythical individuals involved--Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson--help explain why the Civil War remains a topic of interest. But the legacy of the war extends far beyond historical interest or scholarly attention. Here, McPherson draws upon his work over the past fifty years to illuminate the war's continuing resonance across many dimensions of American life. Touching upon themes that include the war's causes and consequences; the naval war; slavery and its abolition; and Lincoln as commander in chief, McPherson ultimately proves the impossibility of understanding the issues of our own time unless we first understand their roots in the era of the Civil War. From racial inequality and conflict between the North and South to questions of state sovereignty or the role of government in social change--these issues, McPherson shows, are as salient and controversial today as they were in the 1860s. Thoughtful, provocative, and authoritative, The War that Forged a Nation looks anew at the reasons America's civil war has remained a subject of intense interest for the past century and a half, and affirms the enduring relevance of the conflict for America today.

This Fiery Trial

The Speeches and Writings of Abraham Lincoln
Author: Abraham Lincoln,William E. Gienapp
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195151015
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 8402
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A revealing collection of Abraham Lincoln's best writings includes the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Rebels and Runaways

Slave Resistance in Nineteenth-Century Florida
Author: Larry Eugene Rivers
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252094034
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 8707
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This gripping study examines slave resistance and protest in antebellum Florida and its local and national impact from 1821 to 1865. Using a variety of sources, Larry Eugene Rivers discusses Florida's unique historical significance as a runaway slave haven dating back to the seventeenth century. In moving detail, Rivers illustrates what life was like for enslaved blacks whose families were pulled asunder as they relocated and how they fought back any way they could to control small parts of their own lives. Identifying slave rebellions such as the Stono, Louisiana, Denmark (Telemaque) Vesey, Gabriel, and the Nat Turner insurrections, Rivers argues persuasively that the size, scope, and intensity of black resistance in the Second Seminole War makes it the largest sustained slave insurrection in American history.

Lincoln and the Jews

A History
Author: Jonathan D. Sarna,Benjamin Shapell
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1466864613
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6731
DOWNLOAD NOW »
One hundred and fifty years after Abraham Lincoln's death, the full story of his extraordinary relationship with Jews is told here for the first time. Lincoln and the Jews: A History provides readers both with a captivating narrative of his interactions with Jews, and with the opportunity to immerse themselves in rare manuscripts and images, many from the Shapell Lincoln Collection, that show Lincoln in a way he has never been seen before. Lincoln's lifetime coincided with the emergence of Jews on the national scene in the United States. When he was born, in 1809, scarcely 3,000 Jews lived in the entire country. By the time of his assassination in 1865, large-scale immigration, principally from central Europe, had brought that number up to more than 150,000. Many Americans, including members of Lincoln's cabinet and many of his top generals during the Civil War, were alarmed by this development and treated Jews as second-class citizens and religious outsiders. Lincoln, this book shows, exhibited precisely the opposite tendency. He also expressed a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings. He befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, appointed numerous Jews to public office, had Jewish advisors and supporters starting already from the early 1850s, as well as later during his two presidential campaigns, and in response to Jewish sensitivities, even changed the way he thought and spoke about America. Through his actions and his rhetoric—replacing "Christian nation," for example, with "this nation under God"—he embraced Jews as insiders. In this groundbreaking work, the product of meticulous research, historian Jonathan D. Sarna and collector Benjamin Shapell reveal how Lincoln's remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. The volume uncovers a new and previously unknown feature of Abraham Lincoln's life, one that broadened him, and, as a result, broadened America.

Slavery's Ghost

The Problem of Freedom in the Age of Emancipation
Author: Richard Follett,Eric Foner,Walter Johnson
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421402351
Category: History
Page: 119
View: 4955
DOWNLOAD NOW »
President Abraham Lincoln freed millions of slaves in the South in 1863, rescuing them, as history tells us, from a brutal and inhuman existence and making the promise of freedom and equal rights. This is a moment to celebrate and honor, to be sure, but what of the darker, more troubling side of this story? Slavery’s Ghost explores the dire, debilitating, sometimes crushing effects of slavery on race relations in American history. In three conceptually wide-ranging and provocative essays, the authors assess the meaning of freedom for enslaved and free Americans in the decades before and after the Civil War. They ask important and challenging questions: How did slaves and freedpeople respond to the promise and reality of emancipation? How committed were white southerners to the principle of racial subjugation? And in what ways can we best interpret the actions of enslaved and free Americans during slavery and Reconstruction? Collectively, these essays offer fresh approaches to questions of local political power, the determinants of individual choices, and the discourse that shaped and defined the history of black freedom. Written by three prominent historians of the period, Slavery’s Ghost forces readers to think critically about the way we study the past, the depth of racial prejudice, and how African Americans won and lost their freedom in nineteenth-century America.

An Unfinished Revolution

Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln
Author: Robin Blackburn,Abraham Lincoln,Karl Marx
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844677222
Category: History
Page: 260
View: 1387
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The impact of the American Civil War on Karl Marx, and Karl Marx on America. Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln exchanged letters at the end of the Civil War. Although they were divided by far more than the Atlantic Ocean, they agreed on the cause of “free labor” and the urgent need to end slavery. In his introduction, Robin Blackburn argues that Lincoln’s response signaled the importance of the German American community and the role of the international communists in opposing European recognition of the Confederacy. The ideals of communism, voiced through the International Working Men’s Association, attracted many thousands of supporters throughout the US, and helped spread the demand for an eight-hour day. Blackburn shows how the IWA in America—born out of the Civil War—sought to radicalize Lincoln’s unfinished revolution and to advance the rights of labor, uniting black and white, men and women, native and foreign-born. The International contributed to a profound critique of the capitalist robber barons who enriched themselves during and after the war, and it inspired an extraordinary series of strikes and class struggles in the postwar decades. In addition to a range of key texts and letters by both Lincoln and Marx, this book includes articles from the radical New York-based journal Woodhull and Claflin’s Weekly, an extract from Thomas Fortune’s classic work on racism Black and White, Frederick Engels on the progress of US labor in the 1880s, and Lucy Parson’s speech at the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World.

Battles for Freedom

The Use and Abuse of American History
Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1784537691
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 2934
DOWNLOAD NOW »
For almost four decades, Eric Foner, one of America's most distinguished historians, has introduced readers of his journalism to unknown or forgotten characters in American history, methodically unearthing the hidden history of American radicalism. In this collection of polemical pieces, Foner expounds on the relevance of Abraham Lincoln's legacy in the age of Obama and on the need for another era of Reconstruction. In addition to articles in which Foner calls out politicians and the powerful for their abuse and misuse of American history, Foner assesses some of his fellow leading historians of the late 20th century, including Richard Hofstadter, Howard Zinn and Eric Hobsbawm. Foner ends with an open letter to Bernie Sanders analysing the great tradition of radicalism that he has spent his career studying and which, he argues, Americans of progressive disposition should seek to celebrate and retrieve

Journal of the Civil War Era

Summer 2014 Issue
Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469615983
Category: History
Page: 203
View: 5762
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 2 June 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Tom Watson Brown Book Award John Fabian Witt Civil War Historians and the Laws of War Articles Chandra Manning Working for Citizenship in Civil War Contraband Camps Michael F. Conlin The Dangerous Isms and the Fanatical Ists: Antebellum Conservatives in the South and the North Confront the Modernity Conspiracy Nicholas Guyatt "An Impossible Idea?" The Curious Career of Internal Colonization Review Essay John Craig Hammond Slavery, Sovereignty, and Empires: North American Borderlands and the American Civil War, 1660-1860 Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Jill Ogline Titus An Unfinished Struggle: Sesquicentennial Interpretations of Slavery and Emancipation

A Wicked War

Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico
Author: Amy S. Greenberg
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307960919
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 9558
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Often forgotten and overlooked, the U.S.-Mexican War featured false starts, atrocities, and daring back-channel negotiations as it divided the nation, paved the way for the Civil War a generation later, and launched the career of Abraham Lincoln. Amy S. Greenberg’s skilled storytelling and rigorous scholarship bring this American war for empire to life with memorable characters, plotlines, and legacies. When President James K. Polk compelled a divided Congress to support his war with Mexico, it was the first time that the young American nation would engage another republic in battle. Caught up in the conflict and the political furor surrounding it were Abraham Lincoln, then a new congressman; Polk, the dour president committed to territorial expansion at any cost; and Henry Clay, the aging statesman whose presidential hopes had been frustrated once again, but who still harbored influence and had one last great speech up his sleeve. Beyond these illustrious figures, A Wicked War follows several fascinating and long-neglected characters: Lincoln’s archrival John Hardin, whose death opened the door to Lincoln’s rise; Nicholas Trist, gentleman diplomat and secret negotiator, who broke with his president to negotiate a fair peace; and Polk’s wife, Sarah, whose shrewd politicking was crucial in the Oval Office. This definitive history of the 1846 conflict paints an intimate portrait of the major players and their world. It is a story of Indian fights, Manifest Destiny, secret military maneuvers, gunshot wounds, and political spin. Along the way it captures a young Lincoln mismatching his clothes, the lasting influence of the Founding Fathers, the birth of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and America’s first national antiwar movement. A key chapter in the creation of the United States, it is the story of a burgeoning nation and an unforgettable conflict that has shaped American history.

The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation

African Americans and the Fight for Freedom
Author: Glenn David Brasher
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807882526
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 913
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war--the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher's unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential manpower and provided intelligence that shaped the campaign's military tactics and strategy and that their activities helped to convince many Northerners that emancipation was a military necessity. Drawing on the voices of Northern soldiers, civilians, politicians, and abolitionists as well as Southern soldiers, slaveholders, and the enslaved, Brasher focuses on the slaves themselves, whose actions showed that they understood from the outset that the war was about their freedom. As Brasher convincingly shows, the Peninsula Campaign was more important in affecting the decision for emancipation than the Battle of Antietam.

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad


Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393244385
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 5594
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Gateway to Freedom

The Hidden History of America's Fugitive Slaves
Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191057827
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 6931
DOWNLOAD NOW »
When slavery was a routine part of life in America's South, a secret network of activists and escape routes enabled slaves to make their way to freedom in what is now Canada. The 'underground railroad' has become part of folklore, but one part of the story is only now coming to light. In New York, a city whose banks, business and politics were deeply enmeshed in the slave economy, three men played a remarkable part, at huge personal risk. In Gateway to Freedom, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner tells the story of Sydney Howard Gay, an abolitionist newspaper editor; Louis Napoleon, furniture polisher; and Charles B. Ray, a black minister. Between 1830 and 1860, with the secret help of black dockworkers, the network led by these three men helped no fewer than 3,000 fugitives to liberty. The previously unexamined records compiled by Gay offer a portrait of fugitive slaves who passed through New York City — where they originated, how they escaped, who helped them in both North and South, and how they were forwarded to freedom in Canada.

Who Freed the Slaves?

The Fight over the Thirteenth Amendment
Author: Leonard L. Richards
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022620894X
Category: History
Page: 322
View: 6540
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In the popular imagination, slavery in the United States ended with Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. The Proclamation may have been limited—freeing only slaves within Confederate states who were able to make their way to Union lines—but it is nonetheless generally seen as the key moment, with Lincoln’s leadership setting into motion a train of inevitable events that culminated in the passage of an outright ban: the Thirteenth Amendment. The real story, however, is much more complicated—and dramatic—than that. With Who Freed the Slaves?, distinguished historian Leonard L. Richards tells the little-known story of the battle over the Thirteenth Amendment, and of James Ashley, the unsung Ohio congressman who proposed the amendment and steered it to passage. Taking readers to the floor of Congress and the back rooms where deals were made, Richards brings to life the messy process of legislation—a process made all the more complicated by the bloody war and the deep-rooted fear of black emancipation. We watch as Ashley proposes, fine-tunes, and pushes the amendment even as Lincoln drags his feet, only coming aboard and providing crucial support at the last minute. Even as emancipation became the law of the land, Richards shows, its opponents were already regrouping, beginning what would become a decades-long—and largely successful—fight to limit the amendment’s impact. Who Freed the Slaves? is a masterwork of American history, presenting a surprising, nuanced portrayal of a crucial moment for the nation, one whose effects are still being felt today.

The Republic of Nature

An Environmental History of the United States
Author: Mark Fiege
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295804149
Category: History
Page: 520
View: 1195
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/

Our Lincoln

New Perspectives on Lincoln and His World
Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393337051
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 9604
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A volume of original essays on the sixteenth president includes James M. McPherson's evaluation of his politics and wartime strategies, Sean Wilentz's perspectives on Lincoln's party politics, and Eric Foner's assessment of his views on slavery and race. 15,000 first printing.