The Great Inka Road

Engineering an Empire
Author: Ramiro Matos,Jose Barreiro
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588345459
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 1704
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This compelling collection of essays explores the Qhapaq nan (or Great Inca Road), an extensive network of trails reaching modern-day Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina. These roads and the accompanying agricultural terraces and structures that have survived for more than six centuries are a testament to the advanced engineering and construction skills of the Inca people. The Qhapaq nan also spurred an important process of ecological and community integration across the Andean region. This book, the companion volume to a National Museum of the American Indian exhibition of the same name, features essays on six main themes: the ancestors of the Inca, Cusco as the center of the empire, road engineering, road transportation and integration, the road in the Colonial era, and the road today. Beautifully designed and featuring more than 225 full-color illustrations, The Great Inka Road is a fascinating look at this enduring symbol of the Andean peoples' strength and adaptability.

The Great Inka Road

Engineering an Empire
Author: José Barreiro,Ramiro Matos Mendieta
Publisher: Smithsonian Books
ISBN: 1588344959
Category: History
Page: 210
View: 5632
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"Accompanying a major exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian"--Dust jacket front flap.

The Inka Empire

A Multidisciplinary Approach
Author: Izumi Shimada
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477303936
Category: Social Science
Page: 392
View: 5039
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Massive yet elegantly executed masonry architecture and andenes (agricultural terraces) set against majestic and seemingly boundless Andean landscapes, roads built in defiance of rugged terrains, and fine textiles with orderly geometric designs—all were created within the largest political system in the ancient New World, a system headed, paradoxically, by a single, small minority group without wheeled vehicles, markets, or a writing system, the Inka. For some 130 years (ca. A.D. 1400 to 1533), the Inka ruled over at least eighty-six ethnic groups in an empire that encompassed about 2 million square kilometers, from the northernmost region of the Ecuador–Colombia border to northwest Argentina. The Inka Empire brings together leading international scholars from many complementary disciplines, including human genetics, linguistics, textile and architectural studies, ethnohistory, and archaeology, to present a state-of-the-art, holistic, and in-depth vision of the Inkas. The contributors provide the latest data and understandings of the political, demographic, and linguistic evolution of the Inkas, from the formative era prior to their political ascendancy to their post-conquest transformation. The scholars also offer an updated vision of the unity, diversity, and essence of the material, organizational, and symbolic-ideological features of the Inka Empire. As a whole, The Inka Empire demonstrates the necessity and value of a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates the insights of fields beyond archaeology and ethnohistory. And with essays by scholars from seven countries, it reflects the cosmopolitanism that has characterized Inka studies ever since its beginnings in the nineteenth century.

A Sacred Landscape

The Search for Ancient Peru
Author: Hugh Thomson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 330
View: 8141
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A follow-up to The White Rock brings readers to remote sites in the central highlands of ancient Incan Peru to trace the rise and fall of pre-Inca civilization through the story of the author's family's relocation to a Yucay valley farm.

Stone Offerings

Machu Picchu's Terraces of Enlightenment
Author: Mike Torrey,Marie Arana
Publisher: Lightpoint Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Architecture
Page: 143
View: 9827
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Presents a collection of photographs of the stone terraces of Machu Picchu, taken at both the summer solstice and the winter solstice, with an introduction explaining what is known of the city's history.

The Second Part of the Chronicle of Peru


Author: Pedro de Cieza de León
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Incas
Page: 247
View: 7207
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The Complete Illustrated History of the Inca Empire

A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of the Incas and Other Ancient Peoples of South America, with More Than 1000 Photographs
Author: David M. Jones
Publisher: Lorenz Books
ISBN: 9780754823582
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 847
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This is a comprehensive encyclopedia of the Incas and other ancient people of South America with more than 1000 photographs. It provides an exploration of the political and social history, art, architecture and mythology of the lost cultures of the Andes. It presents an in-depth history of the ancient people of South America including the Paracas, Chavin, Nazca, Moche, Wari, Lambayeque-Sipan, Tiwanaku, Chimu and Inca. Discover the breathtaking developments in Andean art, from the mysterious lines etched in the Nazca desert to the lovely temples erected at Kotosh, La Galgada and Aspero. Over 1000 colour photographs, paintings, artefacts, maps and artworks bring the ancient cultures of the South America to vivid life. The history of the Incas fascinates the modern world. This groundbreaking book separates fact from fiction, exploring the native people of Peru and the Andes, their mythologies and ancient belief systems, and the amazing beauty of Inca art and architecture. It opens with the culture and history of its many kingdoms and their mythological rituals and beliefs. The second half of the book focuses on the day-to-day lives of ordinary people and the beautiful art they created, such as ceramics, gold- and silverwork and fabrics. This authoritative volume combines over 1000 striking illustrations with lively and engaging text.

Builders of the Hoosac Tunnel


Author: Cliff Schexnayder, PE
Publisher: Peter E. Randall Publisher
ISBN: 1942155085
Category: History
Page: 668
View: 4264
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The Smithsonian Institution's Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology is located in the bowels of the National Museum of American History. Cliff was one of the fortunate who, having received a Dibner Library Resident Scholar award, spent many an hour on the other side of those secreted doors. It was an experience rather like that of C. S. Lewis's Lucy, who climbed into the wardrobe and discovered a magical land. He met no White Witch, but the experience produced this book - the result of a wonderful adventurous journey. Builders of the Hoosac Tunnel traces the interactions between those who worked to bore the five-mile Hoosac railroad tunnel and those who hindered its construction. From the railroad stockholders, to the Canadian brothers who achieved daylight through the mountain, the story follows the evolution of American Civil Engineering.

Ancient People of the Andes


Author: Michael A. Malpass
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501703935
Category: Social Science
Page: 312
View: 7489
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In Ancient People of the Andes, Michael A. Malpass describes the prehistory of western South America from initial colonization to the Spanish Conquest. All the major cultures of this region, from the Moche to the Inkas, receive thoughtful treatment, from their emergence to their demise or evolution. No South American culture that lived prior to the arrival of Europeans developed a writing system, making archaeology the only way we know about most of the prehispanic societies of the Andes. The earliest Spaniards on the continent provided first-person accounts of the latest of those societies, and, as descendants of the Inkas became literate, they too became a source of information. Both ethnohistory and archaeology have limitations in what they can tell us, but when we are able to use them together they are complementary ways to access knowledge of these fascinating cultures. Malpass focuses on large anthropological themes: why people settled down into agricultural communities, the origins of social inequalities, and the evolution of sociopolitical complexity. Ample illustrations, including eight color plates, visually document sites, societies, and cultural features. Introductory chapters cover archaeological concepts, dating issues, and the region's climate. The subsequent chapters, divided by time period, allow the reader to track changes in specific cultures over time.

Raven Brings the Light


Author: Roy Henry Vickers,Robert Budd
Publisher: Harbour Publishing
ISBN: 1550176617
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 40
View: 9016
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In a time when darkness covered the land, a boy named Weget is born who is destined to bring the light. With the gift of a raven's skin that allows him to fly as well as transform, Weget turns into a bird and journeys from Haida Gwaii into the sky. There he finds the Chief of the Heavens who keeps the light in a box. By transforming himself into a pine needle, clever Weget tricks the Chief and escapes with the daylight back down to Earth. Vividly portrayed through the art of Roy Henry Vickers, Weget's story has been passed down for generations. The tale has been traced back at least 3,000 years by archeologists who have found images of Weget's journey in petroglyphs on the Nass and Skeena rivers. This version of the story originates from one told to the author by Chester Bolton, Chief of the Ravens, from the village of Kitkatla around 1975.

Turn Right at Machu Picchu

Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time
Author: Mark Adams
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101535400
Category: Travel
Page: 352
View: 9238
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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! What happens when an unadventurous adventure writer tries to re-create the original expedition to Machu Picchu? In 1911, Hiram Bingham III climbed into the Andes Mountains of Peru and “discovered” Machu Picchu. While history has recast Bingham as a villain who stole both priceless artifacts and credit for finding the great archeological site, Mark Adams set out to retrace the explorer’s perilous path in search of the truth—except he’d written about adventure far more than he’d actually lived it. In fact, he’d never even slept in a tent. Turn Right at Machu Picchu is Adams’ fascinating and funny account of his journey through some of the world’s most majestic, historic, and remote landscapes guided only by a hard-as-nails Australian survivalist and one nagging question: Just what was Machu Picchu?

Encyclopedia of the Incas


Author: Gary Urton,Adriana von Hagen
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0759123632
Category: History
Page: 334
View: 8732
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This A-to-Z encyclopedia offers students and non-specialist readers a broad introduction to the fascinating civilization of the Incas. Brief narrative entries, based on archaeological research and historical records, explore Inca settlements, culture, society, celebrations, and achievements—the texture and scope of the Inca Empire.

Machu Picchu

Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas
Author: Richard L. Burger,Lucy C. Salazar
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300097638
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 8642
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Details the status of contemporary research on Incan civilization, and addresses mysteries of the founding and abandonment of Machu Picchu, charting its archaeological history from 1911 to the present.

The Inka Road System


Author: John Hyslop
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 377
View: 8162
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Lost City

The Discovery of Machu Picchu
Author: Ted Lewin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101652772
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
View: 9471
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Caldecott Honor-winner Ted Lewin takes readers on a thrilling journey to the wilds of Peru in this story of Hiram Bingham, who, in 1911, carved a treacherous path through snake-filled jungles and across perilous mountains in search of Vilcapampa, the lost city of the Incas. Guided the last steps by a young Quechua boy, however, he discovered not the rumored lost city, but the ruins of Machu Picchu, a city totally unknown to the outside world, and one of the wonders of the world.

The First New Chronicle and Good Government

On the History of the World and the Incas up to 1615
Author: Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292779267
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 2341
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One of the most fascinating books on pre-Columbian and early colonial Peru was written by a Peruvian Indian named Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala. This book, The First New Chronicle and Good Government, covers pre-Inca times, various aspects of Inca culture, the Spanish conquest, and colonial times up to around 1615 when the manuscript was finished. Now housed in the Royal Library, Copenhagen, Denmark, and viewable online at www.kb.dk/permalink/2006/poma/info/en/frontpage.htm, the original manuscript has 1,189 pages accompanied by 398 full-page drawings that constitute the most accurate graphic depiction of Inca and colonial Peruvian material culture ever done. Working from the original manuscript and consulting with fellow Quechua- and Spanish-language experts, Roland Hamilton here provides the most complete and authoritative English translation of approximately the first third of The First New Chronicle and Good Government. The sections included in this volume (pages 1–369 of the manuscript) cover the history of Peru from the earliest times and the lives of each of the Inca rulers and their wives, as well as a wealth of information about ordinances, age grades, the calendar, idols, sorcerers, burials, punishments, jails, songs, palaces, roads, storage houses, and government officials. One hundred forty-six of Guaman Poma's detailed illustrations amplify the text.

Madcap May

Mistress of Myth, Men, and Hope
Author: Richard Kurin
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588343278
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 1667
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May Yohe was a popular entertainer from humble American origins who married and then abandoned a wealthy English Lord who owned the fabled Hope diamond--one of the most valuable objects in the world and now exhibited at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. May was a romantic who had numerous lovers and at least three husbands--though the tabloids rumored twelve. One included the playboy son of the Mayor of New York. May separated from him--twice--and cared for her next husband, a South African war hero and invalid whom she later shot. Crossing the paths of Ethel Barrymore, Boris Karloff, Oscar Hammerstein, Teddy Roosevelt, Consuelo Vanderbilt, and the Prince of Wales, May Yohe was a foul-mouthed, sweet-voiced showgirl who drew both the praise and rebuke of Nobel laureate George Bernard Shaw. Nicknamed "Madcap May," she was a favorite of the press. In later years she faced several maternity claims and a law suit which she won. She was hospitalized in an insane asylum and escaped. She ran a rubber plantation in Singapore, a hotel in New Hampshire, and a chicken farm in Los Angeles. When all else failed, she washed floors in a Seattle shipyard, and during the Depression held a job as a government clerk. Shortly before her death, she fought, successfully, to regain her lost U.S. citizenship. How was this woman, May Yohe, able to charm her way to international repute, live an impossible life, and also find the strength to persevere in light of the losses she suffered--in wealth, citizenship, love, and sanity? Madcap May, assembled from her writings and historical interviews, archival records, newspaper stories, scrapbooks, photographs, playbills, theatrical reviews, souvenirs, and silent film, tells her heretofore lost story.

The Invisibility Cloak


Author: Ge Fei
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1681370212
Category: Fiction
Page: 120
View: 4358
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An NYRB Classics Original The hero of The Invisibility Cloak lives in contemporary Beijing—where everyone is doing their best to hustle up the ladder of success while shouldering an ever-growing burden of consumer goods—and he’s a loser. Well into his forties, he’s divorced (and still doting on his ex), childless, and living with his sister (her husband wants him out) in an apartment at the edge of town with a crack in the wall the wind from the north blows through while he gets by, just, by making customized old-fashioned amplifiers for the occasional rich audio-obsessive. He has contempt for his clients and contempt for himself. The only things he really likes are Beethoven and vintage speakers. Then an old friend tips him off about a special job—a little risky but just don’t ask too many questions—and can it really be that this hopeless loser wins? This provocative and seriously funny exercise in the social fantastic by the brilliantly original Ge Fei, one of China’s finest living writers, is among the most original works of fiction to come out of China in recent years. It is sure to appeal to readers of Haruki Murakami and other fabulists of contemporary irreality.

Ancient Nasca Settlement and Society


Author: Helaine Silverman
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 9780877458166
Category: History
Page: 202
View: 7157
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CD-ROM contains: Tables -- Spreadsheets -- Maps -- Supplemental texts -- Site descriptions.

Lost City of the Incas


Author: Hiram Bingham
Publisher: Phoenix
ISBN: 0297865331
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 550
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First published in the 1950s, this is a classic account of the discovery in 1911 of the lost city of Machu Picchu. In 1911 Hiram Bingham, a pre-historian with a love of exotic destinations, set out to Peru in search of the legendary city of Vilcabamba, capital city of the last Inca ruler, Manco Inca. With a combination of doggedness and good fortune he stumbled on the perfectly preserved ruins of Machu Picchu perched on a cloud-capped ledge 2000 feet above the torrent of the Urubamba River. The buildings were of white granite, exquisitely carved blocks each higher than a man. Bingham had not, as it turned out, found Vilcabamba, but he had nevertheless made an astonishing and memorable discovery, which he describes in his bestselling book LOST CITY OF THE INCAS.