The History of Human Rights

From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era
Author: Micheline R. Ishay
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520256415
Category: History
Page: 450
View: 6246

"This well-written book, chock-full of knowledge, presents a history of the idea, or ideas, of human rights through the prism of the author's thoughtful views on key controversies that bedevil human rights discourse to this day."--Professor Sir Nigel Rodley, Chair, University of Essex Human Rights Centre; Member, (UN) Human Rights Committee

The History of Human Rights

From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era
Author: Micheline Ishay
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520934911
Category: Social Science
Page: 480
View: 4019

Micheline Ishay recounts the dramatic struggle for human rights across the ages in a book that brilliantly synthesizes historical and intellectual developments from the Mesopotamian Codes of Hammurabi to today's era of globalization. As she chronicles the clash of social movements, ideas, and armies that have played a part in this struggle, Ishay illustrates how the history of human rights has evolved from one era to the next through texts, cultural traditions, and creative expression. Writing with verve and extraordinary range, she develops a framework for understanding contemporary issues from the debate over globalization to the intervention in Kosovo to the climate for human rights after September 11, 2001. The only comprehensive history of human rights available, the book will be essential reading for anyone concerned with humankind's quest for justice and dignity. Ishay structures her chapters around six core questions that have shaped human rights debate and scholarship: What are the origins of human rights? Why did the European vision of human rights triumph over those of other civilizations? Has socialism made a lasting contribution to the legacy of human rights? Are human rights universal or culturally bound? Must human rights be sacrificed to the demands of national security? Is globalization eroding or advancing human rights? As she explores these questions, Ishay also incorporates notable documents—writings, speeches, and political statements—from activists, writers, and thinkers throughout history.

The History of Human Rights

From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era
Author: Micheline Ishay
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520234970
Category: Social Science
Page: 450
View: 3472

"A definitive account of the history of human rights told from the perspective of those struggling to obtain them. Using the Enlightenment, industrialization, war, national self-determination, and globalization as lenses through which to look at their evolution, Ishay brings both historical context and conceptual acuity to modern debates about the role of human rights in a multicultural world. Her encompassing and compassionate approach issues in a book equally valuable to scholars, students, and citizens."--Benjamin Barber, University of Maryland, author of Jihad vs. McWorld "This well-written book, chock-full of knowledge, presents a history of the idea, or ideas, of human rights through the prism of the author's thoughtful views on key controversies that bedevil human rights discourse to this day."--Professor Sir Nigel Rodley, Chair, University of Essex Human Rights Centre; Member, (UN) Human Rights Committee "The first account of human rights as embedded in the history of political theory, relating it to the basic issues of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity. Erudite and non-dogmatic, Ishay reaches beyond individual human rights to issues of economic, cultural and national rights, and shows how the campaign for human rights was instrumental in bringing down oppressive regimes in the last decades... Humane and generous in its approach, brilliant in its conception and presentation."--Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice


Author: Jack Donnelly
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801467497
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 5276

In the third edition of his classic work, revised extensively and updated to include recent developments on the international scene, Jack Donnelly explains and defends a richly interdisciplinary account of human rights as universal rights. He shows that any conception of human rights-and the idea of human rights itself-is historically specific and contingent. Since publication of the first edition in 1989, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice has justified Donnelly's claim that "conceptual clarity, the fruit of sound theory, can facilitate action. At the very least it can help to unmask the arguments of dictators and their allies."

The Sociology of Human Rights


Author: Mark Frezzo
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745686680
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 7505

Long the arena of philosophers, legal scholars, and political scientists, the interdisciplinary study of human rights has recently seen an influx of sociologists. Why is this so, and how do sociologists contribute to our understanding of human rights in the contemporary world? In this landmark new text, Mark Frezzo explores the sociological perspective on human rights, which he shows to be uniquely placed to illuminate the economic, political, social, and cultural conditions under which human rights norms and laws are devised, interpreted, implemented, and enforced. Sociologists treat human rights not as immutable attributes but as highly contested claims that vary across historical time and geographic space, and investigate how human rights can serve either to empower or to constrain social actors, from large societies to small communities and identity groups. Frezzo guides readers through the scholarly, pedagogical, and practical applications of a sociological view of major debates such as foundationalism vs. social constructionism, universalism vs. particularism, globalism vs. localism, and collective vs. individual rights. This cutting-edge text will appeal to students of sociology, political science, law, development, and social movements, and all interested in the nature, scope, and applicability of human rights in the twenty-first century.

The Human Rights Revolution

An International History
Author: Akira Iriye,Petra Goedde,William I. Hitchcock
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195333144
Category: History
Page: 353
View: 2654

This volume explores the place of human rights in history, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented, with case studies focusing on the 1940s through the present.

Philosophy of Human Rights

Theory and Practice
Author: David Boersema
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429977948
Category: Philosophy
Page: 458
View: 2653

Combining the sustained, coherent perspective of an authored text with diverse, authoritative primary readings, Philosophy of Human Rights provides the context and commentary students need to comprehend challenging rights concepts. Clear, accessible writing, thoughtful consideration of primary source documents, and practical, everyday examples pertinent to students' lives enhance this core textbook for courses on human rights and political philosophy. The first part of the book explores theoretical aspects, including the nature, justification, content, and scope of rights. With an emphasis on contemporary issues and debates, the second part applies these theories to practical issues such as political discourse, free expression, the right to privacy, children's rights, and victims' rights. The third part of the book features the crucial documents that are referred to throughout the book, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the African Charter on Human Rights and Peoples' Rights, and many more.

Human Rights in the Twentieth Century


Author: Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139494104
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8762

Has there always been an inalienable 'right to have rights' as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.

Human Rights

A Primer
Author: Judith Blau,Alberto Moncada
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317258002
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 452

In an era of globalization and greater connectivity, human rights have come to the fore. Human rights depend on treaties but also increasingly on local and national laws and grassroots activism. The authors provide a basic introduction to human rights, and they unveil long-standing yet intensifying obstacles to attaining them-most notably the opposing logics of capitalism and of solidarity and collective struggles. They suggest ways to overcome these contradictions and create greater participation by the U.S. in the international community.

Human Rights and Private Wrongs

Constructing Global Civil Society
Author: Alison Brysk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136073949
Category: Political Science
Page: 168
View: 4182

Human Rights and Private Wrongs breaks new ground by considering a series of fascinating issues that are normally ignored by human rights specialists because they are too "private" to consider as policy issues: children's labor migration; refugee policy towards unaccompanied minors; financial matters of investor and business responsibility; and complex questions involving access to the benefits of pharmaceutical research, transnational organ trafficking, and the control over genetic research.

The Evolution of International Human Rights

Visions Seen
Author: Paul Gordon Lauren
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812209915
Category: Political Science
Page: 432
View: 8134

This widely acclaimed and highly regarded book, used extensively by students, scholars, policymakers, and activists, now appears in a new third edition. Focusing on the theme of visions seen by those who dreamed of what might be, Lauren explores the dramatic transformation of a world patterned by centuries of human rights abuses into a global community that now boldly proclaims that the way governments treat their own people is a matter of international concern—and sets the goal of human rights "for all peoples and all nations." He reveals the truly universal nature of this movement, places contemporary events within their broader historical contexts, and explains the relationship between individual cases and larger issues of human rights with insight. This new edition incorporates material from recently declassified documents and the most recent scholarship relating to the creation of the new Human Rights Council and its Universal Periodic Review, the International Criminal Court, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), terrorism and torture, the impact of globalization and modern technology, and activists in NGOs devoted to human rights. It provides perceptive assessments of the process of change, the power of visions and visionaries, politics and political will, and the evolving meanings of sovereignty, security, and human rights themselves.

Just Violence

Torture and Human Rights in the Eyes of the Police
Author: Rachel Wahl
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503601021
Category: Education
Page: 264
View: 4473

Police who engage in torture are condemned by human rights activists, the media, and people across the world who shudder at their brutality. Stark revelations about torture by American forces at places like Guantanamo Bay have stoked a fascination with torture and debates about human rights. Yet despite this interest, the public knows little about the officers who actually commit such violence. How do the police understand what they do? How do their beliefs inform their responses to education and activism against torture? Just Violence reveals the moral perspective of perpetrators and how they respond to human rights efforts. Through interviews with law enforcers in India, Rachel Wahl uncovers the beliefs that motivate officers who use and support torture, and how these beliefs shape their responses to international human rights norms. Although on the surface Indian officers' subversion of human rights may seem to be a case of "local culture" resisting global norms, officers see human rights as in keeping with their religious and cultural traditions—and view Western countries as the primary human rights violators. However, the police do not condemn the United States for violations; on the contrary, for Indian police, Guantanamo Bay justifies torture in New Delhi. This book follows the attempts of human rights workers to both persuade and coerce officers into compliance. As Wahl explains, current human rights strategies can undermine each other, leaving the movement with complex dilemmas regarding whether to work with or against perpetrators.

Burning Books and Leveling Libraries

Extremist Violence and Cultural Destruction
Author: Rebecca Knuth
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275990077
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 233
View: 5638

In her previous book Libricide, Knuth focused on book destruction by authoritarian regimes: Nazis, Serbs in Bosnia, Iraqis in Kuwait, Maoists during the Cultural Revolution in China, and the Chinese Communists in Tibet. But authoritarian governments are not the only perpetrators. Extremists of all stripes--through terrorism, war, ethnic cleansing, genocide, and other forms of mass violence--are also responsible for widespread cultural destruction, as she demonstrates in this new book. Whether the product of passion or of a cool-headed decision to use ideas to rationalize excess, the decimation of the world's libraries has occurred throughout the 20th century, and there is no end in sight. Cultural destruction is, therefore, of increasing concern to the library community, educators, human rights and civil rights activists, and caring citizens.

The Human Rights Reader

Major Political Essays, Speeches, and Documents from Ancient Times to the Present
Author: Micheline Ishay
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415951607
Category: Political Science
Page: 559
View: 2967

'The Human Rights Reader' explores the changing concept and practice of human rights through the writings of religious humanists, major legal documents, political speeches, and key theoretical approaches. This second edition contains new sections on globalisation and the war on terrorism.

A World Made New

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 0375760466
Category: History
Page: 333
View: 8687

A new book on the beloved first lady chronicles the achievement she was most proud of--the Universal Declaration of Human Rights--and describes her intensive efforts to forge this powerful document in the turbulent period following World War II. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.

Civil Society, Second Edition

The Critical History of an Idea
Author: John R. Ehrenberg
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479871621
Category: Political Science
Page: 352
View: 8739

In the absence of noble public goals, admired leaders, and compelling issues, many warn of a dangerous erosion of civil society, which includes families, religious organizations, and all other NGOs. Are they right? What are the roots and implications of their insistent alarm? How can public life be enriched in a period marked by fraying communities, widespread apathy, and unprecedented levels of contempt for politics? How should we be thinking about civil society? Civil Society: The Critical History of an Idea provides a comprehensive discussion and analysis of two and a half millennia of Western political theory, as well as how civil society might be understood in the future. John Ehrenberg analyzes both the usefulness and the limitations of civil society and maps the political and theoretical evolution of the concept and its employment in academic and public discourse. From Aristotle and the Enlightenment philosophers to Black Lives Matter and the Occupy movement, Ehrenberg provides an indispensable analysis of the possibilities of what this increasingly important idea can, and cannot, offer to contemporary political affairs. In this new, second edition Ehrenberg brings the historical overview up to present day, specifically considering how major events such as 9/11, the global financial crisis, economic inequality, and rapidly advancing technologies alter and shape our relationship to contemporary civil society. Civic engagement, political participation, and volunteerism in contemporary life has faded, he argues, and in order to bring civil society—and all its virtues—back to the fore, we need to counter the suffocating inequality that has taken hold in recent years. Thorough and accessible, Civil Society gives a sweeping overview of a foundational part of political life. Instructor's Guide

International Human Rights and International Education


Author: Thomas Buergenthal,Judith Torney-Purta
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: International education
Page: 211
View: 6711



Inventing Human Rights: A History


Author: Lynn Hunt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393069723
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 5671

“A tour de force.”—Gordon S. Wood, New York Times Book Review How were human rights invented, and how does their tumultuous history influence their perception and our ability to protect them today? From Professor Lynn Hunt comes this extraordinary cultural and intellectual history, which traces the roots of human rights to the rejection of torture as a means for finding the truth. She demonstrates how ideas of human relationships portrayed in novels and art helped spread these new ideals and how human rights continue to be contested today.

International Human Rights Law

Returning to Universal Principles
Author: Mark Gibney
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442249110
Category: Law
Page: 174
View: 5617

This clear and compelling text offers a vastly different approach to human rights. Arguing that not only are human rights universal, but so are the obligations to protect these rights, Mark Gibney concludes that there is a moral and legal imperative to return to the universal principles human rights were founded on.

Globalization and Human Rights


Author: Alison Brysk
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520936280
Category: Social Science
Page: 321
View: 2878

In this landmark volume, Alison Brysk has assembled an impressive array of scholars to address new questions about globalization and human rights. Is globalization generating both problems and opportunities? Are new problems replacing or intensifying state repression? How effective are new forms of human rights accountability? These essays include theoretical analyses by Richard Falk, Jack Donnelly, and James Rosenau. Chapters on sex tourism, international markets, and communications technology bring new perspectives to emerging issues. The authors investigate places such as the Dominican Republic, Nigeria, and the Philippines. The contemporary world is defined by globalization. While global human rights standards and institutions have been established, assaults on human dignity continue. These essays identify the new challenges to be faced, and suggest new ways to remedy the costs of globalization.