The New Immigration Federalism


Author: Pratheepan Gulasekaram,S. Karthick Ramakrishnan
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110711196X
Category: Law
Page: 280
View: 7259
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This book offers an empirical analysis of recent pro- and anti-immigration lawmaking at state and local levels in the USA.

Taking local control

immigration policy activism in U.S. cities and states
Author: Monica Varsanyi
Publisher: Stanford Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: 308
View: 693
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This book explores state and local immigration policy activism from 2002 to the present. It illuminates the challenges confronting the future of immigration policy, and examines the possibility that Congress will implement comprehensive federal immigration legislation, including the legalization of the undocumented residents in the United States. This volume will also introduce and chart a future research agenda that will more deeply explore the impacts of new immigration policies on immigrant communities.

Framing Immigrants

News Coverage, Public Opinion, and Policy
Author: Chris Haynes,Jennifer Merolla,S. Karthick Ramakrishnan
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 161044860X
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 6092
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While undocumented immigration is controversial, the general public is largely unfamiliar with the particulars of immigration policy. Given that public opinion on the topic is malleable, to what extent do mass media shape the public debate on immigration? In Framing Immigrants, political scientists Chris Haynes, Jennifer Merolla, and Karthick Ramakrishnan explore how conservative, liberal, and mainstream news outlets frame and discuss undocumented immigrants. Drawing from original voter surveys, they show that how the media frames immigration has significant consequences for public opinion and has implications for the passage of new immigration policies. The authors analyze media coverage of several key immigration policy issues—including mass deportations, comprehensive immigration reform, and measures focused on immigrant children, such as the DREAM Act—to chart how news sources across the ideological spectrum produce specific “frames” for the immigration debate. In the past few years, liberal and mainstream outlets have tended to frame immigrants lacking legal status as “undocumented” (rather than “illegal”) and to approach the topic of legalization through human-interest stories, often mentioning children. Conservative outlets, on the other hand, tend to discuss legalization using impersonal statistics and invoking the rule of law. Yet, regardless of the media’s ideological positions, the authors’ surveys show that “negative” frames more strongly influence public support for different immigration policies than do positive frames. For instance, survey participants who were exposed to language portraying immigrants as law-breakers seeking “amnesty” tended to oppose legalization measures. At the same time, support for legalization was higher when participants were exposed to language referring to immigrants living in the United States for a decade or more. Framing Immigrants shows that despite heated debates on immigration across the political aisle, the general public has yet to form a consistent position on undocumented immigrants. By analyzing how the media influences public opinion, this book provides a valuable resource for immigration advocates, policymakers, and researchers.

Immigrant Integration in Federal Countries


Author: Christian Joppke,F. Leslie Seidle
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773540334
Category: Political Science
Page: 241
View: 5082
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A comparison of immigrant integration policies in seven federal countries in light of constitutional structures, ethnocultural composition and political trends.

Controversies in American Federalism and Public Policy


Author: Christopher P. Banks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351713388
Category: Law
Page: 200
View: 4766
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This interdisciplinary collection presents a scholarly treatment of how the constitutional politics of federalism affect governments and citizens, offering an accessible yet comprehensive analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court’s federalism jurisprudence and its effect on the development of national and state policies in key areas of constitutional jurisprudence. The contributors address the impact that Supreme Court federalism precedents have in setting the parameters of national law and policies that the states are often bound to respect under constitutional law, including those that relate to the scope and application of gun rights, LGBT freedoms, health care administration, anti-terrorism initiatives, capital punishment, immigration and environmental regulation, the legalization of marijuana and voting rights. Uniting scholarship in law, political science, criminology, and public administration, the chapters study the themes, principles, and politics that traditionally have been at the center of federalism research across different academic disciplines. They look at the origins, nature and effect of dual and cooperative federalism, presidential powers and administrative regulation, state sovereignty and states’ rights, judicial federalism and the advocacy of organized interests.

Illegal, Alien, Or Immigrant

The Politics of Immigration Reform
Author: Lina Newton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814758436
Category: Political Science
Page: 227
View: 4973
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While the United States cherishes its identity as a nation of immigrants, the country’s immigration policies are historically characterized by cycles of openness and xenophobia. Outbursts of anti-immigrant sentiment among political leaders and in the broader public are fueled by a debate over who is worthy of being considered for full incorporation into the nation, and who is incapable of assimilating and taking on the characteristics and responsibilities associated with being an American. In Illegal, Alien, or Immigrant, Lina Newton carefully dissects the political debates over contemporary immigration reform. Beginning with a close look at the disputes of the 1980s and 1990s, she reveals how a shift in legislator’s portrayals of illegal immigrants—from positive to overwhelmingly negative—facilitated the introduction and passing of controversial reforms. Newton’s analysis reveals how rival descriptions of immigrant groups and the flattering or disparaging myths that surround them define, shape, and can ultimately determine fights over immigration policy. Her pathbreaking findings will shed new light on the current political battles, their likely outcomes, and where to go from here.

Unsettled Americans

Metropolitan Context and Civic Leadership for Immigrant Integration
Author: John Mollenkopf,Manuel Pastor
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501703943
Category: Social Science
Page: 344
View: 9756
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The politics of immigration have heated up in recent years as Congress has failed to adopt comprehensive immigration reform, the President has proposed executive actions, and state and local governments have responded unevenly and ambivalently to burgeoning immigrant communities in the context of a severe economic downturn. Moreover we have witnessed large shifts in the locations of immigrants and their families between and within the metropolitan areas of the United States. Charlotte, North Carolina, may be a more active and dynamic immigrant destination than Chicago, Illinois, while the suburbs are receiving ever more immigrants. The work of John Mollenkopf, Manuel Pastor, and their colleagues represents one of the first systematic comparative studies of immigrant incorporation at the metropolitan level. They consider immigrant reception in seven different metro areas, and their analyses stress the differences in capacity and response between central cities, down-at-the-heels suburbs, and outer metropolitan areas, as well as across metro areas. A key feature of case studies in the book is their inclusion of not only traditional receiving areas (New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles) but also newer ones (Charlotte, Phoenix, San Jose, and California's "Inland Empire"). Another innovative aspect is that the authors link their work to the new literature on regional governance, contribute to emerging research on spatial variations within metropolitan areas, and highlight points of intersection with the longer-term processes of immigrant integration. Contributors: Els de Graauw, CUNY; Juan De Lara, University of Southern California; Jaime Dominguez, Northwestern University; Diana Gordon, CUNY; Michael Jones-Correa, Cornell University; Paul Lewis, Arizona State University; Doris Marie Provine, Arizona State University; John Mollenkopf, CUNY; Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California; Rachel Rosner, independent consultant, Florida; Jennifer Tran, City of San Francisco

Policing Immigrants

Local Law Enforcement on the Front Lines
Author: Doris Marie Provine,Monica W. Varsanyi,Paul G. Lewis,Scott H. Decker
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022636321X
Category: Political Science
Page: 208
View: 7077
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The United States deported nearly two million illegal immigrants during the first five years of the Obama presidency—more than during any previous administration. President Obama stands accused by activists of being “deporter in chief.” Yet despite efforts to rebuild what many see as a broken system, the president has not yet been able to convince Congress to pass new immigration legislation, and his record remains rooted in a political landscape that was created long before his election. Deportation numbers have actually been on the rise since 1996, when two federal statutes sought to delegate a portion of the responsibilities for immigration enforcement to local authorities. Policing Immigrants traces the transition of immigration enforcement from a traditionally federal power exercised primarily near the US borders to a patchwork system of local policing that extends throughout the country’s interior. Since federal authorities set local law enforcement to the task of bringing suspected illegal immigrants to the federal government’s attention, local responses have varied. While some localities have resisted the work, others have aggressively sought out unauthorized immigrants, often seeking to further their own objectives by putting their own stamp on immigration policing. Tellingly, how a community responds can best be predicted not by conditions like crime rates or the state of the local economy but rather by the level of conservatism among local voters. What has resulted, the authors argue, is a system that is neither just nor effective—one that threatens the core crime-fighting mission of policing by promoting racial profiling, creating fear in immigrant communities, and undermining the critical community-based function of local policing.

Moving Matters

Paths of Serial Migration
Author: Susan Ossman
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 080478552X
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 1641
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Moving Matters is a richly nuanced portrait of the serial migrant: a person who has lived in several countries, calling each one at some point "home." The stories told here are both extraordinary and increasingly common. Serial migrants rarely travel freely—they must negotiate a world of territorial borders and legal restrictions—yet as they move from one country to another, they can use border-crossings as moments of self-clarification. They often become masters of settlement as they turn each country into a life chapter. Susan Ossman follows this diverse and growing population not only to understand how paths of serial movement produce certain ways of life, but also to illuminate an ongoing tension between global fluidity and the power of nation-states. Ultimately, her lyrical reflection on migration and social diversity offers an illustration of how taking mobility as a starting point fundamentally alters our understanding of subjectivity, politics, and social life.

Federalism and the Making of America


Author: David Brian Robertson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315394480
Category: Political Science
Page: 238
View: 7084
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? Though Americans rarely appreciate it, federalism has profoundly shaped their nation’s past, present, and future. Federalism—the division of government authority between the national government and the states—affects the prosperity, security, and daily life of every American. Some of the most spectacular political conflicts in American history have been fought on the battlefield of federalism, including states’ rights to leave the union, government power to regulate business, and responses to the problems of race, poverty, pollution, abortion, and gay rights. In the second edition of this nuanced and comprehensive text, David Brian Robertson shows that past choices shape present circumstances, and that a deep understanding of American government, public policy, political processes, and society requires an understanding of the key steps in federalism’s evolution in American history. New to the Second Edition Emphasizes that federalism is a battleground that shapes every life inAmerica. Extensively revised and updated, including new coverage of recent controversies like Ferguson, immigration, climate change, Obamacare, gay rights, the minimum wage, political polarization, voter identification, fracking, and marijuana legalization. Brings together the newest developments in history, political science, law,and related disciplines to show how federalism influences government and politics today. Includes chapter-opening vignettes that deal with contemporary cases and policy challenges. ?

Immigration and Politics in the New Europe

Reinventing Borders
Author: Gallya Lahav
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521535304
Category: Law
Page: 316
View: 2571
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Includes statistics.

Comparative Federalism

Constitutional Arrangements and Case Law
Author: Francesco Palermo,Karl Kössler
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1509901515
Category: Law
Page: 504
View: 6469
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This is the first comprehensive book that explores the subject of federalism from the perspective of comparative constitutional law, whilst simultaneously placing a strong emphasis on how federal systems work in practice. This focus is reflected in the book's two most innovative elements. First, it analyses from a comparative point of view how government levels exercise their powers and interact in several highly topical policy areas like social welfare, environmental protection or migrant integration. Second, the book incorporates case law boxes discussing seminal judgments from federal systems worldwide and thus demonstrates the practical impact of constitutional jurisprudence on policymakers and citizens alike. "This is simply the best analysis of contemporary federalism currently available. It is comprehensive in its coverage, thorough in its analysis, and persuasive in its conclusions. Every student of federalism, from novice to expert, will find benefit from this volume.†? Professor G Alan Tarr, Rutgers University "Wading through the thicket of the multiple forms that the federal idea has taken in the contemporary world, this remarkably comprehensive treatise backed by case law fills a long-awaited gap in the literature on comparative federalism. It combines a mastery of the literature on federal theory with a critical understanding of how it plays out in practice. Outstanding in the breadth of its scope, this magisterial survey will serve as a work of reference for generations of scholars who seek to understand how federalism works in developed as well as developing countries.†? Professor Balveer Arora, Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi "This book is an extraordinarily handy work of reference on the diverse federal-type systems of the world. It handles both shared principles and differences of perspective, structure or practice with confidence and ease. It will become a standard work for scholars and practitioners working in the field.†? Professor Cheryl Saunders, The University of Melbourne "This is a remarkable book – for its sheer breadth of scope, combining detail of practice with analysis of federal principles, and for its fresh look at federalism. With great erudition, drawing on world scholarship and the practice of federalism across the globe, Palermo and Kössler magnificently traverse from the ancient roots of federalism to the contemporary debates on ethno-cultural dimensions and participatory democracy. The book sets a new benchmark for the study of comparative federalism, providing new insights that are bound to influence practice in an era where federal arrangements are expected to deliver answers to key governance and societal challenges.†? Professor Nico Steytler, University of the Western Cape

Civil Rights in Public Service


Author: Phillip J. Cooper
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317516370
Category: Political Science
Page: 628
View: 4685
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Promises of justice and equality made in the U.S. Constitution, numerous Amendments, and decisions of the Supreme Court are hallmarks of American civil rights. Yet the realities of inequality remain facts of modern life for too many Native Americans, African Americans, and Latino Americans, even though state-mandated racial segregation has been outlawed for years. Women still face a variety of forms of discrimination—some subtle and others more overt. There remain many laws that treat people differently because of sexual orientation. People with disabilities are supposed to be protected by a variety of statutes, but many of these policies remain unfulfilled promises. These are just some of the many challenges of civil rights that persist in a nation that proudly points to the words above the entrance to the U.S. Supreme Court that read "Equal Justice Under Law." This text is for current and future public service professionals —whether they are in government agencies, in nonprofit organizations that provide social services for government, or contractors who operate as state actors—who increasingly serve diverse communities with a range of complex challenges, while working and managing within organizations that, fortunately, are themselves more diverse than ever before. For those who work and serve in such settings, civil rights is not an abstract academic study, but a critically important and very practical fact of daily life. This book may also be used on civil rights law, policy, and public administration courses, and each chapter ends with a section on ‘Issues for Policy and Practice’ to guide an examination of key public policy hurdles in the fight for civil rights as well as the implications for public service practice. Through an engaging exploration of edited court cases, legislation, and speeches, the reader is encouraged to think critically about civil rights law and policy pertaining to African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos/Latinas, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities, to learn what civil rights require, but also to come to a more empathetic understanding of how different groups of people experience civil rights and the unique challenges they face.

Understanding Immigration Law


Author: Kevin R. Johnson,Raquel Aldana,Bill Ong Hing,Leticia Saucedo
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 0769881971
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 5212
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The Second Edition of Understanding Immigration Law lays out the basics of U.S. immigration law in an accessible way to newcomers to the field. It offers background about the intellectual, historical, and constitutional foundations of U.S. immigration law. The eBook also identifies the factors that have historically fueled migration to the United States, including the economic "pull" of jobs and family in the United States and the "push" of economic hardship, political instability, and other facts of life in the sending country. In the middle chapters, the authors provide a capsule summary of the law concerning the admissions and removal procedures and criteria in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The book ends with a chapter speculating about the future of U.S. immigration law and the challenges and opportunities facing the nation. This eBook provides a comprehensive overview of U.S. immigration law. It has been designed to supplement the most widely adopted immigration law casebooks. The eBook versions of this title feature links to Lexis Advance for further legal research options.

Arizona Firestorm


Author: N.A
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442214163
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 6363
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Law and the Quest for Justice


Author: Marjorie Zatz, Doris Marie Provine, and James Walsh
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610271645
Category: Law
Page: 198
View: 4287
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An insightful collection of essays from leading voices on the challenges and promise of justice and law. This new book is accessible and interesting to a wide audience. It features internationally renowned members of the academy, national political figures, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists, and crusading lawyers. The thought-provoking topics include: Erwin Chemerinsky on reconceptualizing federalism • John Echohawk on Native American rights • Jack Greenberg on Brown v. Board's legacy • Linda Greenhouse on how Supreme Court Justices evolve over time • Lani Guinier on reframing affirmative action • Antonia Hernández on what citizenship means after 9/11 • Anthony Lewis on broadening presidential power to fight terrorism • Janet Napolitano on security and rights after 9/11 • Charles Ogletree on achieving racial justice • Robert Reich on the economic inheritance of our children • Judith Resnik on Guantánamo, Miranda, and public rights to fairness • Geoffrey Stone on sacrificing civil liberties in wartime. The volume originates from a lecture series honoring legal legend John P. Frank, who represented Ernesto Miranda in the Supreme Court. It is edited and presented by Marjorie S. Zatz and Doris Marie Provine--both professors of Justice & Social Inquiry at Arizona State University--and Arizona attorney James P. Walsh, who was also a law partner to John Frank.

The Politics of Immigration in Multi-Level States

Governance and Political Parties
Author: E. Hepburn,R. Zapata-Barrero
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113735853X
Category: Political Science
Page: 304
View: 1033
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This book develops an exploratory theory of immigration in multilevel states addressing two themes: governance and political parties. It examines not only how, and by whom, immigration policy is decided and implemented at different levels, but also how it has become a key-issue of party competition across multilevel states.

Immigration Regulation in Federal States

Challenges and Responses in Comparative Perspective
Author: Sasha Baglay,Delphine Nakache
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401786046
Category: Social Science
Page: 244
View: 4039
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The book examines the phenomenon of immigration federalism: its main characteristics, why and how it has developed, its implications for immigration systems (in general) and non-citizens’ rights (in particular). The book introduces the reader to theoretical perspectives on immigration federalism through three sets of literature – federalism, governance and non-citizens’ rights – that provide a necessary framework for understanding immigration federalism’s multiple facets and impacts. It also offers an analysis of immigration federalism through case studies of six jurisdictions: Australia, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, the EU and the US. Despite increased sub-national activity in immigration regulation in several federal states, very little research has been dedicated so far to comparing how federal states deal with immigration federalism. Comparative studies on the human rights implications of immigration federalism have received even less attention. This book seeks to fill the gap in this area and is an important contribution to the field, providing the reader with a better understanding of the complex issues surrounding immigration federalism and its impact on non-citizens.

Strange Neighbors

The Role of States in Immigration Policy
Author: Gabriel J. Chin
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814737803
Category: Law
Page: 276
View: 6416
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Since its founding, the U.S. has struggled with issues of federalism and states’ rights. In almost every area of law, from abortion to zoning, conflicts arise between the states and the federal government over which entity is best suited to create and enforce laws. In the last decade, immigration has been on the front lines of this debate, with states such as Arizona taking an extremely assertive role in policing immigrants within their borders. While Arizona and its notorious SB 1070 is the most visible example of states claiming expanded responsibility to make and enforce immigration law, it is far from alone. An ordinance in Hazelton, Pennsylvania prohibited landlords from renting to the undocumented. Several states have introduced legislation to deny citizenship to babies who are born to parents who are in the United States without authorization. Other states have also enacted legislation aimed at driving out unauthorized migrants. Strange Neighbors explores the complicated and complicating role of the states in immigration policy and enforcement, including voices from both sides of the debate. While many contributors point to the dangers inherent in state regulation of immigration policy, at least two support it, while others offer empirically-based examinations of state efforts to regulate immigration within their borders, pointing to wide, state-by-state disparities in locally-administered immigration policies and laws. Ultimately, the book offers an extremely timely, thorough, and spirited discussion on an issue that will continue to dominate state and federal legislatures for years to come.

Dividing Lines

The Politics of Immigration Control in America
Author: Daniel J. Tichenor
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400824984
Category: Political Science
Page: 400
View: 5099
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Immigration is perhaps the most enduring and elemental leitmotif of America. This book is the most powerful study to date of the politics and policies it has inspired, from the founders' earliest efforts to shape American identity to today's revealing struggles over Third World immigration, noncitizen rights, and illegal aliens. Weaving a robust new theoretical approach into a sweeping history, Daniel Tichenor ties together previous studies' idiosyncratic explanations for particular, pivotal twists and turns of immigration policy. He tells the story of lively political battles between immigration defenders and doubters over time and of the transformative policy regimes they built. Tichenor takes us from vibrant nineteenth-century politics that propelled expansive European admissions and Chinese exclusion to the draconian restrictions that had taken hold by the 1920s, including racist quotas that later hampered the rescue of Jews from the Holocaust. American global leadership and interest group politics in the decades after World War II, he argues, led to a surprising expansion of immigration opportunities. In the 1990s, a surge of restrictionist fervor spurred the political mobilization of recent immigrants. Richly documented, this pathbreaking work shows that a small number of interlocking temporal processes, not least changing institutional opportunities and constraints, underlie the turning tides of immigration sentiments and policy regimes. Complementing a dynamic narrative with a host of helpful tables and timelines, Dividing Lines is the definitive treatment of a phenomenon that has profoundly shaped the character of American nationhood.