The Organic Machine

The Remaking of the Columbia River
Author: Richard White
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952423
Category: History
Page: 144
View: 8580
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The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. In this pioneering study, White explores the relationship between the natural history of the Columbia River and the human history of the Pacific Northwest for both whites and Native Americans. He concentrates on what brings humans and the river together: not only the physical space of the region but also, and primarily, energy and work. For working with the river has been central to Pacific Northwesterners' competing ways of life. It is in this way that White comes to view the Columbia River as an organic machine--with conflicting human and natural claims--and to show that whatever separation exists between humans and nature exists to be crossed.

A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia (Revised and Updated)


Author: Blaine Harden
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393342565
Category: Nature
Page: 286
View: 6651
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"Superbly reported and written with clarity, insight, and great skill." —Washington Post Book World After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation. A River Lost is a searing personal narrative of rediscovery joined with a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once-wild river. Updated throughout, this edition features a new foreword and afterword.

Confluence


Author: Sara B. Pritchard
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674049659
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 371
View: 4153
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Sara B. Pritchard traces the Rhône’s remaking since 1945, showing how state officials, technical elites, and citizens connected the environment and technology to political identities and state-building, and demonstrating the importance of environmental management and technological development to the culture and politics of modern France.

London


Author: John Broich
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822978660
Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Page: 231
View: 1734
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As people crowded into British cities in the nineteenth century, industrial and biological waste byproducts and then epidemic followed. Britons died by the thousands in recurring plagues. Figures like Edwin Chadwick and John Snow pleaded for measures that could save lives and preserve the social fabric. The solution that prevailed was the novel idea that British towns must build public water supplies, replacing private companies. But the idea was not an obvious or inevitable one. Those who promoted new waterworks argued that they could use water to realize a new kind of British society--a productive social machine, a new moral community, and a modern civilization. They did not merely cite the dangers of epidemic or scarcity. Despite many debates and conflicts, this vision won out--in town after town, from Birmingham to Liverpool to Edinburgh, authorities gained new powers to execute municipal water systems. But in London local government responded to environmental pressures with a plan intended to help remake the metropolis into a collectivist society. The Conservative national government, in turn, sought to impose a water administration over the region that would achieve its own competing political and social goals. The contestants over London's water supply matched divergent strategies for administering London's water with contending visions of modern society. And the matter was never pedestrian. The struggle over these visions was joined by some of the most colorful figures of the late Victorian period, including John Burns, Lord Salisbury, Bernard Shaw, and Sidney and Beatrice Webb. As Broich demonstrates, the debate over how to supply London with water came to a head when the climate itself forced the endgame near the end of the nineteenth century. At that decisive moment, the Conservative party succeeded in dictating the relationship between water, power, and society in London for many decades to come.

Silenced rivers

the ecology and politics of large dams
Author: Patrick McCully
Publisher: Egully.com
ISBN: N.A
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 359
View: 3041
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Includes statistics.

Down by the Bay

San Francisco's History Between the Tides
Author: Matthew Morse Booker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520273206
Category: History
Page: 278
View: 898
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San Francisco Bay is the largest and most productive estuary on the Pacific Coast of North America. It is also home to the oldest and densest urban settlements in the American West. Focusing on human inhabitation of the Bay since Ohlone times, Down by the Bay reveals the ongoing role of nature in shaping that history. From birds to oyster pirates, from gold miners to farmers, from salt ponds to ports, this is the first history of the San Francisco Bay and Delta as both a human and natural landscape. It offers invaluable context for current discussions over the best management and use of the Bay in the face of sea level rise.

A World of Rivers

Environmental Change on Ten of the World's Great Rivers
Author: Ellen Wohl
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226904806
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 1240
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Far from being the serene, natural streams of yore, modern rivers have been diverted, dammed, dumped in, and dried up, all in efforts to harness their power for human needs. But these rivers have also undergone environmental change. The old adage says you can’t step in the same river twice, and Ellen Wohl would agree—natural and synthetic change are so rapid on the world’s great waterways that rivers are transforming and disappearing right before our eyes. A World of Rivers explores the confluence of human and environmental change on ten of the great rivers of the world. Ranging from the Murray-Darling in Australia and the Yellow River in China to Central Europe’s Danube and the United States’ Mississippi, the book journeys down the most important rivers in all corners of the globe. Wohl shows us how pollution, such as in the Ganges and in the Ob of Siberia, has affected biodiversity in the water. But rivers are also resilient, and Wohl stresses the importance of conservation and restoration to help reverse the effects of human carelessness and hubris. What all these diverse rivers share is a critical role in shaping surrounding landscapes and biological communities, and Wohl’s book ultimately makes a strong case for the need to steward positive change in the world’s great rivers.

Contested Waters

A Social History of Swimming Pools in America
Author: Jeff Wiltse
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807888988
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 8429
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From nineteenth-century public baths to today's private backyard havens, swimming pools have long been a provocative symbol of American life. In this social and cultural history of swimming pools in the United States, Jeff Wiltse relates how, over the years, pools have served as asylums for the urban poor, leisure resorts for the masses, and private clubs for middle-class suburbanites. As sites of race riots, shrinking swimsuits, and conspicuous leisure, swimming pools reflect many of the tensions and transformations that have given rise to modern America.

Nature Incorporated

Industrialization and the Waters of New England
Author: Theodore Steinberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521527118
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 304
View: 5865
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A reinterpretation of industrialization that centres on the struggle to control and master nature.

Beyond the Missouri

The Story of the American West
Author: Richard W. Etulain
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826340337
Category: History
Page: 466
View: 6410
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A narrative history of the many peoples and cultures of the American West from prehistory to the twenty-first century.

Reckoning with Reagan

America and Its President in the 1980s
Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195078060
Category: Fiction
Page: 194
View: 4327
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Surveys the Reagan administration's domestic and foreign policies and discusses economic conditions, social and political changes, the drug war, and relations with the Soviet Union

Concrete Revolution

Large Dams, Cold War Geopolitics, and the US Bureau of Reclamation
Author: Christopher Sneddon
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022628445X
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 7554
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Water may seem innocuous, but as a universal necessity, it inevitably intersects with politics when it comes to acquisition, control, and associated technologies. While we know a great deal about the socioecological costs and benefits of modern dams, we know far less about their political origins and ramifications. In Concrete Revolution, Christopher Sneddon offers a corrective: a compelling historical account of the US Bureau of Reclamation’s contributions to dam technology, Cold War politics, and the social and environmental adversity perpetuated by the US government in its pursuit of economic growth and geopolitical power. Founded in 1902, the Bureau became enmeshed in the US State Department’s push for geopolitical power following World War II, a response to the Soviet Union’s increasing global sway. By offering technical and water resource management advice to the world’s underdeveloped regions, the Bureau found that it could not only provide them with economic assistance and the United States with investment opportunities, but also forge alliances and shore up a country’s global standing in the face of burgeoning communist influence. Drawing on a number of international case studies—from the Bureau’s early forays into overseas development and the launch of its Foreign Activities Office in 1950 to the Blue Nile investigation in Ethiopia—Concrete Revolution offers insights into this historic damming boom, with vital implications for the present. If, Sneddon argues, we can understand dams as both technical and political objects rather than instruments of impartial science, we can better participate in current debates about large dams and river basin planning.

The Long, Bitter Trail

Andrew Jackson and the Indians
Author: Anthony Wallace
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429934275
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 143
View: 2465
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An account of Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830, which relocated Eastern Indians to the Okalahoma Territory over the Trail of Tears, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs which was given control over their lives.

Empty nets

Indians, dams, and the Columbia River
Author: Roberta Ulrich
Publisher: Oregon State University Press
ISBN: 9780870711886
Category: Social Science
Page: 254
View: 4099
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Empty Nets is a disturbing history of broken promises and justice delayed. It chronicles a native people's fight to maintain their livelihood and culture in the face of an indifferent federal bureaucracy and hostile state governments. In 1939, the U.S. Government promised to provide Columbia River Indians with replacements for traditional fishing sites flooded in the backwater of the Bonneville Dam. Roberta Ulrich recounts the Indians' sixtyyear struggle, in the courts and on the river, to persuade the government to keep its promise. From the beginning, the battle was intertwined with the tribes' larger effort to assert treatyguaranteed fishing rights. Ulrich deftly examines a host of other issues--including declining salmon runs, industrial development, tribal selfgovernment, and recreation--that became enmeshed in the tribes' pursuit of justice. Her broad and incisive account ranges from descriptions of the dam's disastrous effec ts on a salmondependent culture to portraits of the plights of individual Indian families. Descendants of those to whom the promise was made and ac tivists who have s pent their lives working to acquire the sites reveal the remarkable patience and resilience of the Columbia River Indians. In a new epilogue, Ulrich updates the story of the treaty fishing sites-- now all nearly completed--and describes political and cultural developments since 1999, including a major new component: the planned reconstruc tion of the Celilo Indian Village. And yet des pite the everchanging circumstances surrounding the treaty sites, the tribes' objec tive remains the same. In the words of Donald Sampson, former executive direc tor of the Columbia River InterTribal Fish Commission, "Our people's desire is simple--to preserve the fish, to preserve our way of life, now and for future generations."

The Specter of Communism

The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1917-1953
Author: Melvyn P. Leffler
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952350
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 6208
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The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. The Specter of Communism is a concise history of the origins of the Cold War and the evolution of U.S.-Soviet relations, from the Bolshevik revolution to the death of Stalin. Using not only American documents but also those from newly opened archives in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, Leffler shows how the ideological animosity that existed from Lenin's seizure of power onward turned into dangerous confrontation. By focusing on American political culture and American anxieties about the Soviet political and economic threat, Leffler suggests new ways of understanding the global struggle staged by the two great powers of the postwar era.

Atlas of the Pacific Northwest


Author: Oregon State University,A. Jon Kimerling
Publisher: Oregon State Univ Pr
ISBN: 9780870714160
Category: Psychology
Page: 152
View: 7033
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A convenient, authoritative reference book on Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, with almost 200 maps and graphs, as well as photographs and essays. No other single volume provides more comprehensive information about the natural environment and human activities within the region.

The Republic of Nature

An Environmental History of the United States
Author: Mark Fiege
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295804149
Category: History
Page: 520
View: 4170
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In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/

Ornamentalism

How the British Saw Their Empire
Author: David Cannadine
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195157949
Category: History
Page: 263
View: 1795
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Ornamentalism is a vividly evocative account of a vanished era, a major reassessment of Britain and its imperial past, and a trenchant and disturbing analysis of what it means to be a post-imperial nation today.

Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature


Author: William Cronon
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393315118
Category: History
Page: 561
View: 6768
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Essays by revisionist historians, scientists, and cultural critics explore the connection between nature and American culture, analyzing how it is packaged and presented at places such as Sea World and the Nature Company stores

The Turning Points of Environmental History


Author: Frank Uekötter
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780822961185
Category: History
Page: 206
View: 1734
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In this volume, an international group of environmental historians examine the significant ways in which humans have impacted their surroundings throughout history.