The Persians


Author: Aeschylus,Robert Auletta
Publisher: Sun & Moon
ISBN: 9781557131355
Category: Drama
Page: 94
View: 6839
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The First Surviving Play in the history of western drama. The Persians represents a courageous act on the part of its author. The subject of Aeschylus' play was, in part, the conquering of the Persians by the Greeks, but he presented that event to his Greek audience not from their point of view, but from that of the defeated Persians. Accordingly, the Greeks were faced with a very human portrait of a people that they had only recently enslaved. The effect was to make the enemy knowable, to show the humanity of a people which war - as it has since time immemorial - had generalized and dehumanized. The lesson of Aeschylus' play speaks just as clearly today as it did for the ancient Greeks: the enemy is always us, human beings with shared (even if slightly dissimilar) aspirations and dreams. As director Peter Sellars points out in his introduction, "By humanizing the enemy, Aeschylus begins to suggest that we have much to learn about ourselves through the eyes of others, and that what we think we know about others should be questioned and expanded." In this modern version of Aeschylus' play. Robert Auletta shifts the action of the play from Persia to a modern-day Iraq, and, like Aeschylus, asks Americans to question and challenge their views of our recently defeated enemies.

Persians


Author: Aeschylus,,Janet Lembke,C. J. Herington
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195070088
Category: Fiction
Page: 144
View: 8783
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The First Surviving Play in the history of western drama. The Persians represents a courageous act on the part of its author. The subject of Aeschylus' play was, in part, the conquering of the Persians by the Greeks, but he presented that event to his Greek audience not from their point of view, but from that of the defeated Persians. Accordingly, the Greeks were faced with a very human portrait of a people that they had only recently enslaved. The effect was to make the enemy knowable, to show the humanity of a people which war - as it has since time immemorial - had generalized and dehumanized. The lesson of Aeschylus' play speaks just as clearly today as it did for the ancient Greeks: the enemy is always us, human beings with shared (even if slightly dissimilar) aspirations and dreams. As director Peter Sellars points out in his introduction, "By humanizing the enemy, Aeschylus begins to suggest that we have much to learn about ourselves through the eyes of others, and that what we think we know about others should be questioned and expanded." In this modern version of Aeschylus' play. Robert Auletta shifts the action of the play from Persia to a modern-day Iraq, and, like Aeschylus, asks Americans to question and challenge their views of our recently defeated enemies.

The Persians by Aeschylus


Author: Brandon Brown
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780982212059
Category: Poetry
Page: 77
View: 655
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Poetry. "The Persians, an ancient play by Aeschylus, shows the Persian court during the time of the war between the Persians and the Greeks. It depicts the Persians learning of their massive defeat at the hands of the Greek army. I believed that the text which proceeded from my body should report on my total experience of reading The Persians by Aeschylus, not simply report on the 'meanings' of the 'words' of that work. This was an obviously impossible project. To help myself out, I tried to include many collaborators to intervene in the translation, especially including Edward Said, Jane Austen, Walter Benjamin, my Arabic class, the Clash, e-mail correspondence with a translator recruiter from the U.S. Army, and Rumi; also all the things I ate and drank and wore and said and did are in the translation; and most especially I tried to pay attention to the terrific war and the terrific language that the war made that completely infiltrated all of my food and beverages and clothes and words and actions, and I let that get in the way of the translation too. In this way, THE PERSIANS BY AESCHYLUS transmits numerous reports: a report of a reading, a toxological report of the reading and the writing; those latencies did not lie down"—Brandon Brown.

Περσαι

With Introduction and Commentary by A.F. Garvie
Author: Aeschylus,A. F. Garvie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199269890
Category: Drama
Page: 398
View: 3360
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A new edition, with Introduction and Commentary, of Aeschylus' Persae, first produced in 472 BC. A. F. Garvie argues that the play is a genuine tragedy, which, far from presenting a simple moral of hybris punished by the gods, poses questions concerning human suffering to which there are no easy answers.

Persae


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 153
View: 8797
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The Persians and Other Plays

The Persians / Prometheus Bound / Seven Against Thebes / The Suppliants
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141955899
Category: Drama
Page: 304
View: 7037
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Aeschylus (525-456 BC) brought a new grandeur and epic sweep to the drama of classical Athens, raising it to the status of high art. The Persians, the only Greek tragedy to deal with events from recent Athenian history, depicts the final defeat of Persia in the battle of Salamis, through the eyes of the Persian court of King Xerxes, becoming a tragic lesson in tyranny. In Prometheus Bound, the defiant Titan Prometheus is brutally punished by Zeus for daring to improve the state of wretchedness and servitude in which mankind is kept. Seven Against Thebes shows the inexorable downfall of the last members of the cursed family of Oedipus, while The Suppliants relates the pursuit of the fifty daughters of Danaus by the fifty sons of Aegyptus, and their final rescue by a heroic king.

Aeschylus I

The Persians, The Seven Against Thebes, The Suppliant Maidens, Prometheus Bound
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226311457
Category: Drama
Page: 200
View: 4970
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Aeschylus I contains “The Persians,” translated by Seth Benardete; “The Seven Against Thebes,” translated by David Grene; “The Suppliant Maidens,” translated by Seth Benardete; and “Prometheus Bound,” translated by David Grene. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

The Persians of Aeschylus, tr. with notes by W. Palin


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 2529
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Aeschylus: The suppliant maidens, The Persians, translated by S. G. Benardete. Seven against Thebes, Prometheus bound, translated by D. Grene


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 2058
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Orestie


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 339
View: 8049
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Aeschylus - The Eumenides

Translaton by E.D.A. Morshead
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Scribe Publishing
ISBN: 9781787371422
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 381
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AEschylus is often regarded as the father of Greek tragedy; he moved play writing from the simple interaction of a single character and a chorus to one where many characters interact and thereby create more dynamic and dramatic situations. AEschylus, was the son of Euphorion, and a scion of a Eupatrid or noble family. He was born at Eleusis 525 B.C., or, as the Greeks calculated time, in the fourth year of the 63rd Olympiad. He first worked at a vineyard and whilst there claimed to have been visited by Dionysis in a dream and told to turn his attention to the tragic art. It was a dream that would deliver a rich and incredible legacy through his writing talents. His earliest tragedy, composed when he was twenty-six years of age, failed to win the fabled Dionysia, (a revered festival of theatre) and it was not until fifteen years later that he gained this victory in 484BC going on to win it again in 472 BC (for The Persians), 467 BC (for Seven Against Thebes) and 463 BC (for The Suppliants). AEschylus was also known for his military skills and was ready to fight in defence of Athens whenever the call was made. He and his brother, Cynegeirus, fought against Darius's invading Persian army at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE and, although the Greeks won against overwhelming odds, Cynegeirus died in the battle, which had a naturally had a profound effect on AEschylus. He made several visits to the important Greek city of Syracuse in Sicily at the invitation of the tyrant Hieron, and it is thought that he also travelled extensively in the region of Thrace. His writing continued to be the envy of others. With the series of plays of which Seven Against Thebes was a part, his supremacy was undisputed. He was the -father of tragedy.- AEschylus made many changes to dramatic form. The importance of the chorus was demoted and a second added to give prominence to the dialogue and making that interchange the leading feature of the play. He removed all deeds of bloodshed from the public view, and in their place provided various spectacular elements, improving the costumes, making the masks more expressive and convenient, and probably adopting the cothurnus to increase the stature of the performers. Finally, he established the custom of contending for the prize with trilogies, an inter-connecting set of three independent dramas. The closing years of the life of AEschylus were mainly spent in Sicily, which he had first visited soon after his defeat at the Dionysia by Sophocles. AEschylus returned to Athens to produce his Orestean trilogy, probably the finest of his works, although the Eumenides, the last of the three plays, revealed so openly his aristocratic tendencies that he became extremely unpopular, and returned to Sicily for the last time in 458 BCE and it was there that he died, while visiting the city of Gela in 456 or 455 BCE.

The Persae of Aeschylus


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521040108
Category: History
Page: 424
View: 1999
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Dr Broadhead assesses the Persae as a work of dramatic art, considers how far Aeschylus' patriotism has coloured his presentation of the tragedy, discusses the possibility that the play is part of a tetralogy, and reviews the evidence for a Sicilian text.

Der Liebhaber


Author: Marguerite Duras
Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag
ISBN: 3518737694
Category: Fiction
Page: 143
View: 5788
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Sie treffen sich auf einer Fähre über dem Mekong, es ist ein ungleiches Paar im Indochina der dreißiger Jahre. Er ein Chinese aus reichem Elternhaus, sie eine französische Halbwaise, die mit ihrer Mutter und zwei Brüdern in einem einst herrschaftlichen Haus am Fluss lebt. Ein abgedunkeltes Zimmer oberhalb des geschäftigen Straßenlebens in Saigon wird der heimliche Zufluchtsort der Liebenden. Ihre sexuelle Erkundung ist ein rebellischer Aufschrei gegen die unumstößlichen Regeln der tropischen Kolonie und die erschütternden familiären Machtspiele. Doch wie weit kann das Spiel mit dem Feuer getrieben werden? Marguerite Duras' intimster Roman besticht durch seine elektrisierende Kraft. Der Liebhaber ist eine zeitlose Geschichte einer sündigen und zerstörerischen Leidenschaft, die ihre Leser berauscht und in den Bann zieht.

Tradition and Dramatic Form in "The Persians" of Aeschylus


Author: Ann N. Michelini
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004065864
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 162
View: 9270
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The Reader's Encyclopedia of World Drama


Author: John Gassner,Edward Quinn
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 9780486420646
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 1030
View: 6876
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The first and best single-volume reference of its kind, this comprehensive work traces world drama from its earliest ritual forms to modern times. Focusing on the literary content of the plays, it features articles by nearly 100 distinguished contributors, including Eric Bentley, Alfred Harbage, Jacques Guichamaud, Cedric Whitman, and Wallace Fowlie.nbsp;350 black-and-white illustrations.

Brill's Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus


Author: Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004348824
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 8765
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Aeschylus, 2

The Persians, Seven Against Thebes, The Suppliants, Prometheus Bound
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812216714
Category: Drama
Page: 232
View: 4910
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"A boon for classicists and general readers alike. For the reader who comes to tragedy for the first time, these translations are eminently 'accessible,' and consummately American in tone and feeling. For the classicist, these versions constitute an ambitious reinterpretation of traditional masterpieces; after 2,500 years, the poetry of Euripides and Aeschylus has found a new voice—in fact, ten of them."—The Boston Book Review

Prometheus Bound and Other Plays


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141915811
Category: Drama
Page: 160
View: 9051
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Aeschylus (525–456 BC) brought a new grandeur and epic sweep to the drama of classical Athens, raising it to the status of high art. In Prometheus Bound the defiant Titan Prometheus is brutally punished by Zeus for daring to improve the state of wretchedness and servitude in which mankind is kept. The Suppliants tells the story of the fifty daughters of Danaus who must flee to escape enforced marriages, while Seven Against Thebes shows the inexorable downfall of the last members of the cursed family of Oedipus. And The Persians, the only Greek tragedy to deal with events from recent Athenian history, depicts the aftermath of the defeat of Persia in the battle of Salamis, with a sympathetic portrayal of its disgraced King Xerxes. Philip Vellacott’s evocative translation is accompanied by an introduction, with individual discussions of the plays, and their sources in history and mythology.

Nine Greek Dramas by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes


Author: Aeschylus,Sophocles
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 1616400471
Category: Drama
Page: 472
View: 6420
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Author names not noted above: Euripides and Aristophanes. Translator names not noted above: E.D.A. Morshead, E.H. Plumtre, Gilbert Murray, and B.B. Rogers. Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf. Volume VIII features nine plays by the greatest of the Greek dramatists: [ from AESCHYLUS (c. 525 Bic. 456 Be, the father of tragedy: Agamemnon, The Libation-Bearers, and The Furies, which constitute his trilogy known as the Oresteia; and Prometheus Bound, about the downfall of the god who gave fire to humanity [ from SOPHOCLES (c. 496 Bi406 Be: the ultimate Greek tragedy, Oedipus the King, as well as Antigone, still regularly performed today [ from EURIPIDES (c. 480 Bi406 Be: Hippolytus, based on the legend of the son of Theseus, the founder of Athens, and The Bacchae, the story of a king who refused to worship the god Dionysus [ from Aristophanes (c. 446 Bic. 386 Be, the father of comedy: The Frogs, a political satire featuring the god Dionysus.