The Persians by Aeschylus


Author: Brandon Brown
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780982212059
Category: Poetry
Page: 77
View: 6875
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Poetry. "The Persians, an ancient play by Aeschylus, shows the Persian court during the time of the war between the Persians and the Greeks. It depicts the Persians learning of their massive defeat at the hands of the Greek army. I believed that the text which proceeded from my body should report on my total experience of reading The Persians by Aeschylus, not simply report on the 'meanings' of the 'words' of that work. This was an obviously impossible project. To help myself out, I tried to include many collaborators to intervene in the translation, especially including Edward Said, Jane Austen, Walter Benjamin, my Arabic class, the Clash, e-mail correspondence with a translator recruiter from the U.S. Army, and Rumi; also all the things I ate and drank and wore and said and did are in the translation; and most especially I tried to pay attention to the terrific war and the terrific language that the war made that completely infiltrated all of my food and beverages and clothes and words and actions, and I let that get in the way of the translation too. In this way, THE PERSIANS BY AESCHYLUS transmits numerous reports: a report of a reading, a toxological report of the reading and the writing; those latencies did not lie down"—Brandon Brown.

The Persians and Other Plays

The Persians / Prometheus Bound / Seven Against Thebes / The Suppliants
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141955899
Category: Drama
Page: 304
View: 8729
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Aeschylus (525-456 BC) brought a new grandeur and epic sweep to the drama of classical Athens, raising it to the status of high art. The Persians, the only Greek tragedy to deal with events from recent Athenian history, depicts the final defeat of Persia in the battle of Salamis, through the eyes of the Persian court of King Xerxes, becoming a tragic lesson in tyranny. In Prometheus Bound, the defiant Titan Prometheus is brutally punished by Zeus for daring to improve the state of wretchedness and servitude in which mankind is kept. Seven Against Thebes shows the inexorable downfall of the last members of the cursed family of Oedipus, while The Suppliants relates the pursuit of the fifty daughters of Danaus by the fifty sons of Aegyptus, and their final rescue by a heroic king.

Aeschylus, Persians


Author: David Rosenbloom
Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co Ltd
ISBN: 9780715632864
Category: Drama
Page: 224
View: 1614
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Aeschylus' Persians is the earliest extant Greek tragedy and sole surviving historical tragedy

The Greek Plays

Sixteen Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides
Author: Mary Lefkowitz,Sophocles
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0812983092
Category: Greek drama
Page: 864
View: 7883
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A landmark anthology of the masterpieces of Greek drama, featuring all-new, highly accessible translations of some of the world's most beloved plays, including Agamemnon, Prometheus Bound, Bacchae, Electra, Medea, Antigone, and Oedipus the King Featuring translations by Emily Wilson, Frank Nisetich, Sarah Ruden, Rachel Kitzinger, Mary Lefkowitz, and James Romm The great plays of Ancient Greece are among the most enduring and important legacies of the Western world. Not only is the influence of Greek drama palpable in everything from Shakespeare to modern television, the insights contained in Greek tragedy have shaped our perceptions of the nature of human life. Poets, philosophers, and politicians have long borrowed and adapted the ideas and language of Greek drama to help them make sense of their own times. This exciting curated anthology features a cross section of the most popular--and most widely taught--plays in the Greek canon. Fresh translations into contemporary English breathe new life into the texts while capturing, as faithfully as possible, their original meaning. This outstanding collection also offers short biographies of the playwrights, enlightening and clarifying introductions to the plays, and helpful annotations at the bottom of each page. Appendices by prominent classicists on such topics as "Greek Drama and Politics," "The Theater of Dionysus," and "Plato and Aristotle on Tragedy" give the reader a rich contextual background. A detailed time line of the dramas, as well as a list of adaptations of Greek drama to literature, stage, and film from the time of Seneca to the present, helps chart the history of Greek tragedy and illustrate its influence on our culture from the Roman Empire to the present day. With a veritable who's who of today's most renowned and distinguished classical translators, The Greek Plays is certain to be the definitive text for years to come. Praise for The Greek Plays "Mary Lefkowitz and James Romm deftly have gathered strong new translations from Frank Nisetich, Sarah Ruden, Rachel Kitzinger, Emily Wilson, as well as from Mary Lefkowitz and James Romm themselves. There is a freshness and pungency in these new translations that should last a long time. I admire also the introductions to the plays and the biographies and annotations provided. Closing essays by five distinguished classicists--the brilliant Daniel Mendelsohn and the equally skilled David Rosenbloom, Joshua Billings, Mary-Kay Gamel, and Gregory Hays--all enlightened me. This seems to me a helpful light into our gathering darkness."--Harold Bloom

The Persians


Author: Aeschylus,Robert Auletta
Publisher: Sun & Moon
ISBN: 9781557131355
Category: Drama
Page: 94
View: 1562
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The First Surviving Play in the history of western drama. The Persians represents a courageous act on the part of its author. The subject of Aeschylus' play was, in part, the conquering of the Persians by the Greeks, but he presented that event to his Greek audience not from their point of view, but from that of the defeated Persians. Accordingly, the Greeks were faced with a very human portrait of a people that they had only recently enslaved. The effect was to make the enemy knowable, to show the humanity of a people which war - as it has since time immemorial - had generalized and dehumanized. The lesson of Aeschylus' play speaks just as clearly today as it did for the ancient Greeks: the enemy is always us, human beings with shared (even if slightly dissimilar) aspirations and dreams. As director Peter Sellars points out in his introduction, "By humanizing the enemy, Aeschylus begins to suggest that we have much to learn about ourselves through the eyes of others, and that what we think we know about others should be questioned and expanded." In this modern version of Aeschylus' play. Robert Auletta shifts the action of the play from Persia to a modern-day Iraq, and, like Aeschylus, asks Americans to question and challenge their views of our recently defeated enemies.

Prometheus Bound: And the Seven Against Thebes


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1105999580
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 8528
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The punishment of Prometheus as a consequence of the theft is a major theme of his mythology, and is a popular subject of both ancient and modern art. Zeus, king of the Olympian gods, sentenced the Titan to eternal torment for his transgression. The immortal Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to feed on his liver, only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next day. In some stories, Prometheus is freed at last by the hero Heracles (Hercules).

Prometheus Bound and Other Plays


Author: Aeschylus,Philip Vellacott
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0140441123
Category: Drama
Page: 159
View: 2911
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Aeschylus (525;456 BC) brought a new grandeur and epic sweep to the drama of classical Athens, raising it to the status of high art. In Prometheus Bound the defiant Titan Prometheus is brutally punished by Zeus for daring to improve the state of wretchedness and servitude in which mankind is kept. The Suppliants tells the story of the fifty daughters of Danaus who must flee to escape enforced marriages, while Seven Against Thebes shows the inexorable downfall of the last members of the cursed family of Oedipus. And The Persians, the only Greek tragedy to deal with events from recent Athenian history, depicts the aftermath of the defeat of Persia in the battle of Salamis, with a sympathetic portrayal of its disgraced King Xerxes. Philip Vellacott's evocative translation is accompanied by an introduction, with individual discussions of the plays, and their sources in history and mythology.

The Artistry of Aeschylus and Zeami

A Comparative Study of Greek Tragedy and No
Author: Mae J. Smethurst
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400860059
Category: Drama
Page: 356
View: 1683
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By means of a cross-cultural analysis of selected examples of early Japanese and early Greek drama, Mae Smethurst enhances our appreciation of each form. While using the methods of a classicist to increase our understanding of no as literary texts, she also demonstrates that the fifteenth-century treatises of Zeami--an important playwright, actor, critic, and teacher of no--offer fresh insight into Aeschylus' use of actors, language, and various elements of stage presentation. Relatively little documentation apart from the texts of the plays is available for the Greek theater of the fifth century B.C., but Smethurst uses documentation on no, and evidence from no performances today, to suggest how presentations of the Persians could have been so successful despite the play's lack of dramatic confrontation. Aeschylean theater resembles that of Zeami in creating its powerful emotional and aesthetic effect through a coherent organization of structural elements. Both playwrights used such methods as the gradual intensification of rhythmic and musical effects, an increase in the number and complexity of the actors' movements, and a progressive focusing of attention on the main actors and on costumes, masks, and props during the course of the play. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Περσαι

With Introduction and Commentary by A.F. Garvie
Author: Aeschylus,A. F. Garvie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199269890
Category: Drama
Page: 398
View: 6324
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A new edition, with Introduction and Commentary, of Aeschylus' Persae, first produced in 472 BC. A. F. Garvie argues that the play is a genuine tragedy, which, far from presenting a simple moral of hybris punished by the gods, poses questions concerning human suffering to which there are no easy answers.

The Battle of Marathon


Author: Peter Krentz
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300168802
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 8764
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How did the city-state of Athens defeat the invaders from Persia, the first world empire, on the plain of Marathon in 490 BCE? Clever scholars skeptical of our earliest surviving source, Herodotus, have produced one ingenious theory after another. In this stimulating new book, bound to provoke controversy, Peter Krentz argues that Herodotus was right after all. Beginning his analysis with the Athenians’ first formal contact with the Persians in 507 BCE, Krentz weaves together ancient evidence with travelers’ descriptions, archaeological discoveries, geological surveys, and the experiences of modern reenactors and soldiers to tell his story. Krentz argues that before Marathon the Athenian army fought in a much less organized way than the standard view of the hoplite phalanx suggests: as an irregularly armed mob rather than a disciplined formation of identically equipped infantry. At Marathon the Athenians equipped all their fighters, including archers and horsemen, as hoplites for the first time. Because their equipment weighed only half as much as is usually thought, the Athenians and their Plataean allies could charge almost a mile at a run, as Herodotus says they did. Krentz improves on this account in Herodotus by showing why the Athenians wanted to do such a risky thing.

Imagining Xerxes

Ancient Perspectives on a Persian King
Author: Emma Bridges
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472511328
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5116
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Xerxes, the Persian king who invaded Greece in 480 BC, quickly earned a notoriety that endured throughout antiquity and beyond. The Greeks' historical encounter with this eastern king Â? which resulted, against overwhelming odds, in the defeat of the Persian army Â? has inspired a series of literary responses to Xerxes in which he is variously portrayed as the archetypal destructive and enslaving aggressor, as the epitome of arrogance and impiety, or as a figure synonymous with the exoticism and luxury of the Persian court. Imagining Xerxes is a transhistorical analysis that explores the richness and variety of Xerxes' afterlives within the ancient literary tradition. It examines the earliest representations of the king, in Aeschylus' tragic play Persians and Herodotus' historiographical account of the Persian Wars, before tracing the ways in which the image of Xerxes was revisited and adapted in later Greek and Latin texts. The author also looks beyond the Hellenocentric viewpoint to consider the construction of Xerxes' image in the Persian epigraphic record and the alternative perspectives on the king found in the Jewish written tradition. Analysing these diverse representations of Xerxes, this title explores the reception of a key figure in the ancient world and the reinvention of his image in a remarkable array of cultural and historical contexts.

Dionysalexandros

Essays on Aeschylus and His Fellow Tragedians: In Honour of Alexander F Garvie
Author: Douglas Cairns,Vayos Liapis
Publisher: ISD LLC
ISBN: 191058956X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 300
View: 7491
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In seventeen original essays, a distinguished international cast considers the text, interpretation and cultural context of Greek tragedy. There are detailed studies of single plays, of major themes in each of the three tragedians, of modern approaches to tragic text and interpretation, and of the genre's social, religious and political background. Some of tragedy's most distinguished interpreters here present their latest work, and pay tribute to the scholarly achievements of the volume's honorand, Professor A.F. Garvie.

The tragedies of Aeschylus


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Greek drama (Tragedy)
Page: 672
View: 6875
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Greeks and Barbarians


Author: Thomas Harrison
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351565028
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 4377
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Greeks and Barbarians examines ancient Greek conceptions of the "other." The attitudes of Greeks to foreigners and there religions, and cultures, and politics reveals as much about the Greeks as it does the world they inhabited. Despite occasional interest in particular aspects of foreign customs, the Greeks were largely hostile and dismissive viewing foreigners as at best inferior, but more often as candidates for conquest and enslavement.

The Frogs of Aristophanes


Author: Aristophanes
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Greek drama (Comedy)
Page: 136
View: 5402
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Xerxes

A Persian Life
Author: Richard Stoneman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216041
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 3186
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Xerxes, Great King of the Persian Empire from 486–465 B.C., has gone down in history as an angry tyrant full of insane ambition. The stand of Leonidas and the 300 against his army at Thermopylae is a byword for courage, while the failure of Xerxes’ expedition has overshadowed all the other achievements of his twenty-two-year reign. In this lively and comprehensive new biography, Richard Stoneman shows how Xerxes, despite sympathetic treatment by the contemporary Greek writers Aeschylus and Herodotus, had his reputation destroyed by later Greek writers and by the propaganda of Alexander the Great. Stoneman draws on the latest research in Achaemenid studies and archaeology to present the ruler from the Persian perspective. This illuminating volume does not whitewash Xerxes’ failings but sets against them such triumphs as the architectural splendor of Persepolis and a consideration of Xerxes’ religious commitments. What emerges is a nuanced portrait of a man who ruled a vast and multicultural empire which the Greek communities of the West saw as the antithesis of their own values.

The Greco-Persian Wars


Author: Peter Green
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520917065
Category: History
Page: 356
View: 9768
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This is a reissue, with a new introduction and an update to the bibliography, of the original edition, published in 1970 as The Year of Salamis in England and as Xerxes at Salamis in the U.S. The long and bitter struggle between the great Persian Empire and the fledgling Greek states reached its high point with the extraordinary Greek victory at Salamis in 480 B.C. The astonishing sea battle banished forever the specter of Persian invasion and occupation. Peter Green brilliantly retells this historic moment, evoking the whole dramatic sweep of events that the Persian offensive set in motion. The massive Greek victory, despite the Greeks' inferior numbers, opened the way for the historic evolution of the Greek states in a climate of creativity, independence, and democracy, one that provided a model and an inspiration for centuries to come. Green's accounts of both Persian and Greek strategies are clear and persuasive; equally convincing are his everyday details regarding the lives of soldiers, statesmen, and ordinary citizens. He has first-hand knowledge of the land and sea he describes, as well as full command of original sources and modern scholarship. With a new foreword, The Greco-Persian Wars is a book that lovers of fine historical writing will greet with pleasure.

Writing Ancient Persia


Author: Thomas Harrison
Publisher: Duckworth Pub
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 190
View: 433
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The history of Achaemenid Persia - the empire of Cyrus the Great, Darius and Xerxes - has largely been rewritten in the last thirty years. Inspired by new sources of information, and by a determination to see Persia in its own terms, historians have created a powerful new image of the Persian Empire: tightly organised and resilient, tolerant towards the religions and cultures of its subject peoples, and with kings and queens whose concerns were pragmatic rather than whimsically despotic. Writing Ancient Persia offers a far-reaching appreciation and critique of this recent movement. The bias of Greek sources on Persia, it argues, cannot simply be peeled away to reveal authentic source material. Persian evidence points to a significantly less rosy image of Persian imperialism. And past writers on Achaemenid Persia, far from rejecting it as the nurror image and enemy of the Greeks, frequently traced its influence on the classical Greco-Roman world, and identified strongly with Persia as a model.

Persians


Author: Aeschylus,,Janet Lembke,C. J. Herington
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195070088
Category: Fiction
Page: 144
View: 8886
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The First Surviving Play in the history of western drama. The Persians represents a courageous act on the part of its author. The subject of Aeschylus' play was, in part, the conquering of the Persians by the Greeks, but he presented that event to his Greek audience not from their point of view, but from that of the defeated Persians. Accordingly, the Greeks were faced with a very human portrait of a people that they had only recently enslaved. The effect was to make the enemy knowable, to show the humanity of a people which war - as it has since time immemorial - had generalized and dehumanized. The lesson of Aeschylus' play speaks just as clearly today as it did for the ancient Greeks: the enemy is always us, human beings with shared (even if slightly dissimilar) aspirations and dreams. As director Peter Sellars points out in his introduction, "By humanizing the enemy, Aeschylus begins to suggest that we have much to learn about ourselves through the eyes of others, and that what we think we know about others should be questioned and expanded." In this modern version of Aeschylus' play. Robert Auletta shifts the action of the play from Persia to a modern-day Iraq, and, like Aeschylus, asks Americans to question and challenge their views of our recently defeated enemies.

The Persian Wars


Author: Herodotus
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780674991309
Category:
Page: 503
View: 574
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