We the People, Volume 3

The Civil Rights Revolution
Author: Bruce Ackerman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067441649X
Category: Law
Page: 432
View: 6794
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The Civil Rights Revolution carries Bruce Ackerman's sweeping reinterpretation of constitutional history into the era beginning with Brown v Board of Education. Laws that ended Jim Crow and ensured equal rights at work, in schools, and in the voting booth gained congressional approval only after the American people mobilized their support.

We the People, Volume 3

The Civil Rights Revolution
Author: Bruce Ackerman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674416503
Category: Law
Page: 431
View: 6745
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The Civil Rights Revolution carries Bruce Ackerman's sweeping reinterpretation of constitutional history into the era beginning with Brown v Board of Education. Laws that ended Jim Crow and ensured equal rights at work, in schools, and in the voting booth gained congressional approval only after the American people mobilized their support.

The Decline and Fall of the American Republic


Author: Bruce Ackerman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674058399
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 2006
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Constitutional thought is currently dominated by heroic tales of the Founding Fathers — who built an Enlightenment machine that can tick-tock its way into the twenty-first century, with a little fine-tuning by the Supreme Court. However, according to Bruce Ackerman, the modern presidency is far more dangerous today than it was when Arthur Schlesinger published the Imperial Presidency in 1973. In this book, he explores how the interaction of changes in the party system, mass communications, the bureaucracy, and the military have made the modern presidency too powerful and a threat to liberal constitutionalism and democracy. Ackerman argues that the principles of constitutional legitimacy have been undermined by both political and legal factors. On the political level, by “government by emergency” and “government by public-opinion poll”; on the legal, by two rising institutions: The Office of Legal Counsel in the Department of Justice and the Office of the Presidential Counsel in the White House. Both institutions came out of the New Deal, but have gained prominence only in the last generation. Lastly, Ackerman kicks off a reform debate that aims to adapt the Founding ideal of checks-and-balances to twenty-first century realities. His aim is not to propose definitive solutions but to provoke a national debate on American democracy in its time of trouble.

We the People, Volume 1

Foundations
Author: Bruce A. Ackerman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674948419
Category: History
Page: 369
View: 5026
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Volume 3, Publisher description: The Civil Rights Revolution carries Bruce Ackerman's sweeping reinterpretation of constitutional history into the era beginning with Brown v. Board of Education. From Rosa Parks's courageous defiance, to Martin Luther King's resounding cadences in "I Have a Dream," to Lyndon Johnson's leadership of Congress, to the Supreme Court's decisions redefining the meaning of equality, the movement to end racial discrimination decisively changed our understanding of the Constitution. Ackerman anchors his discussion in the landmark statutes of the 1960s: the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. Challenging conventional legal analysis and arguing instead that constitutional politics won the day, he describes the complex interactions among branches of government--and also between government and the ordinary people who participated in the struggle. He showcases leaders such as Everett Dirksen, Hubert Humphrey, and Richard Nixon who insisted on real change, not just formal equality, for blacks and other minorities. The Civil Rights Revolution transformed the Constitution, but not through judicial activism or Article V amendments. The breakthrough was the passage of laws that ended the institutionalized humiliations of Jim Crow and ensured equal rights at work, in schools, and in the voting booth. This legislation gained congressional approval only because of the mobilized support of the American people--and their principles deserve a central place in the nation's history. Ackerman's arguments are especially important at a time when the Roberts Court is actively undermining major achievements of America' Second Reconstruction.

The Civil Rights Movement in American Memory


Author: Renee Christine Romano,Leigh Raiford
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820325384
Category: History
Page: 382
View: 8586
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The movement for civil rights in America peaked in the 1950s and1960s; however, a closely related struggle, this time over themovement's legacy, has been heatedly engaged over the past twodecades. How the civil rights movement is currently being rememberedin American politics and culture - and why it matters - is the commontheme of the thirteen essays in this unprecedented collection.Memories of the movement are being created and maintained - in waysand for purposes we sometimes only vaguely perceive - throughmemorials, art exhibits, community celebrations, and even streetnames.

Sharing the Prize


Author: Gavin Wright
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674076443
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 368
View: 6277
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Southern bus boycotts and lunch counter sit-ins were famous acts of civil disobedience but were also demands for jobs in the very services being denied blacks. Gavin Wright shows that the civil rights struggle was of economic benefit to all parties: the wages of southern blacks increased dramatically but not at the expense of southern whites.

We Have No Leaders

African Americans in the Post-Civil Rights Era
Author: Robert C. Smith
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438420536
Category: Social Science
Page: 396
View: 6807
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This comprehensive study of African American politics since the civil rights era concludes that the black movement has been co-opted, marginalized, and almost wholly incorporated into mainstream institutions.

Fog of War

The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement
Author: Stephen Tuck
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195382404
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 1459
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This collection is a timely reconsideration of the intersection between two of the dominant events of twentieth-century American history, the upheaval wrought by the Second World War and the social revolution brought about by the African American struggle for equality. Scholars from a wide range of fields explore the impact of war on the longer history of African American protest from many angles: from black veterans to white segregationists, from the rural South to northern cities, from popular culture to federal politics, and from the American confrontations to international connections. It is well known that World War II gave rise to human rights rhetoric, discredited a racist regime abroad, and provided new opportunities for African Americans to fight, work, and demand equality at home. It would be all too easy to assume that the war was a key stepping stone to the modern civil rights movement. But the authors show that in reality the momentum for civil rights was not so clear cut, with activists facing setbacks as well as successes and their opponents finding ways to establish more rigid defenses for segregation. While the war set the scene for a mass movement, it also narrowed some of the options for black activists.

The Human Tradition in the Civil Rights Movement


Author: Susan M. Glisson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742544093
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 350
View: 4202
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This engaging collection of biographies explores the greater civil rights movement in America from Reconstruction to the 1970s while emphasizing the importance of grassroots actions and individual agency in the effort to bring about national civil renewal. While focusing on the importance of individuals on the local level working towards civil rights they also explore the influence that this primarily African-American movement had on others including La Raza, the Native American Movement, feminism, and gay rights. By widening the time frame studied, these essays underscore the difficult, often unrewarded and generational nature of social change.

Social Justice in the Liberal State


Author: Bruce Ackerman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300158076
Category: Political Science
Page: 405
View: 9323
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This essay has taken up much of my time, and more of my energy, for the past ten years. It has been impossible to be my friend during this period without enduring countless conversations and scribblings devoted to one or nother line of thought. As a result, my friends have contributed enormously to the final product. While I will refrain from a blow-by-blow account, this book would never have emerged without their ceaseless criticisms and encouragements.It is easier to be more specific in detailing my other debts. Judith Shklar, by her personal example, introduced me to the reality of political philosophy while I was a student of hers at Harvard College. Proceeding to the Yale Law School in the mid-1960s, I encountered a group of teachers who gave Shklar's message a new force: Alexander Bickel, Robert Bork, Guido Calabresi, Ronald Dworkin, Charles Reich. While these people were very different from one another, they convinced me that political action was futile without systematic reflection.

Free At Last

A History of the Civil Rights Movement and Those Who Died in the Struggle
Author: Sara Bullard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199762279
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 112
View: 3317
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Here is an illustrated history of the civil rights movement, written and designed for ages 10 to adult, that clearly and effectively brings the turbulent years of struggle to life, and gives a vivid and powerful experience of what it was like not so very long ago. Provides a brief overview of black history in the US, discussing the civil-rights movement chronologically through stories and photos.

The Civil Rights Movement


Author: Peter B. Levy
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313298547
Category: History
Page: 226
View: 3766
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A one-stop guide for students providing narrative description, in-depth analysis, biographies, and key primary documents on the Civil Rights movement.

Civil Rights Movement

People and Perspectives
Author: Michael Ezra
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598840371
Category: History
Page: 250
View: 7607
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Presents a collection of essays about the history of the civil rights movement, focusing on the efforts of clergy, student activists, black nationalists, and such organizations as the NCAAP and Core to bring about racial equality.

In Search of the Black Fantastic

Politics and Popular Culture in the Post-Civil Rights Era
Author: Richard Iton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199720835
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 8777
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Prior to the 1960s, when African Americans had little access to formal political power, black popular culture was commonly seen as a means of forging community and effecting political change. But as Richard Iton shows in this provocative and insightful volume, despite the changes brought about by the civil rights movement, and contrary to the wishes of those committed to narrower conceptions of politics, black artists have continued to play a significant role in the making and maintenance of critical social spaces. Iton offers an original portrait of the relationship between popular culture and institutionalized politics tracing the connections between artists such as Paul Robeson, Lorraine Hansberry, Richard Pryor, Bob Marley, and Erykah Badu and those individuals working in the protest, electoral, and policy making arenas. With an emphasis on questions of class, gender and sexuality-and diaspora and coloniality-the author also illustrates how creative artists destabilize modern notions of the proper location of politics, and politics itself. Ranging from theater to film, and comedy to literature and contemporary music, In Search of the Black Fantastic is an engaging and sophisticated examination of how black popular culture has challenged our understandings of the aesthetic and its relationship to politics.

A More Beautiful and Terrible History

The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History
Author: Jeanne Theoharis
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807075876
Category: HISTORY
Page: 288
View: 8416
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The civil rights movement has become national legend, lauded by presidents from Reagan to Obama to Trump, as proof of the power of American democracy. This fable, featuring dreamy heroes and accidental heroines, has shuttered the movement firmly in the past, whitewashed the forces that stood in its way, and diminished its scope. And it is used perniciously in our own times to chastise present-day movements and obscure contemporary injustice. In A More Beautiful and Terrible History award-winning historian Jeanne Theoharis dissects this national myth-making, teasing apart the accepted stories to show them in a strikingly different light. We see Rosa Parks not simply as a bus lady but a lifelong criminal justice activist and radical; Martin Luther King, Jr. as not only challenging Southern sheriffs but Northern liberals, too; and Coretta Scott King not only as a "helpmate" but a lifelong economic justice and peace activist who pushed her husband's activism in these directions. Moving from "the histories we get" to "the histories we need," Theoharis challenges nine key aspects of the fable to reveal the diversity of people, especially women and young people, who led the movement; the work and disruption it took; the role of the media and "polite racism" in maintaining injustice; and the immense barriers and repression activists faced. Theoharis makes us reckon with the fact that far from being acceptable, passive or unified, the civil rights movement was unpopular, disruptive, and courageously persevering. Activists embraced an expansive vision of justice - which a majority of Americans opposed and which the federal government feared. By showing us the complex reality of the movement, the power of its organizing, and the beauty and scope of the vision, Theoharis proves that there was nothing natural or inevitable about the progress that occurred.

A People's History of the United States

1492-Present
Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317325303
Category: History
Page: 744
View: 7984
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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

The Second Reconstruction

A History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement
Author: Gary Donaldson
Publisher: Krieger Publishing Company
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 153
View: 6160
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This text traces the history of the civil rights movement in the years following World War II, to the present day. Issues discussed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights of 1965, and the Northern Ireland ghetto's.

Criminal Law in the Age of the Administrative State


Author: Vincent Chiao
Publisher: Studies in Penal Theory and Ph
ISBN: 0190273941
Category: Law
Page: 280
View: 2477
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What is the criminal law for? One influential answer is that the criminal law vindicates pre-political rights and condemns wrongdoing. On this account, the criminal law has an intrinsic subject matter-certain types of moral wrongdoing-and it provides a distinctive response to that wrongdoing, namely condemnatory punishment. In Criminal Law in the Age of the Administrative State, Vincent Chiao offers an alternative, public law account. What the criminal law is for, Chiao suggests, is sustaining social cooperation with public institutions. Consequently, we only have reason to support the use of the criminal law insofar as its use is consistent with our reasons for valuing the social order established by those institutions. By starting with the political morality of public institutions rather than the interpersonal morality of private relationships, this account shows how the criminal law is continuous with the modern administrative and welfare state, and why it is answerable to the same political virtues. Chiao sketches a democratic egalitarian account of those virtues, one that is loosely consequentialist, egalitarian but not equalizing, and centered on a form of freedom-effective access to central capabilities-as its currency of evaluation. From this point of view, the role of the criminal law is to help public institutions create a society in which each person can lead a life as a peer among peers. Chiao shows how a democratic egalitarian approach to criminal justice provides a fresh perspective on a range of contemporary problems, from mass incarceration to overcriminalization, due process and the collateral consequences of a criminal conviction.

The Civil Rights Movement and the Logic of Social Change


Author: Joseph E. Luders
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521116511
Category: Political Science
Page: 246
View: 7182
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This book examines the success and failure of social movements to bring about change in American society, focusing on the targets of protests to explain diverse outcomes.

We the Corporations

How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights
Author: Adam Winkler
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781631495441
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 496
View: 1497
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In a revelatory work praised as "excellent and timely" (New York Times Book Review, front page), Adam Winkler, author of Gunfight, once again makes sense of our fraught constitutional history in this incisive portrait of how American businesses seized political power, won "equal rights," and transformed the Constitution to serve big business. Uncovering the deep roots of Citizens United, he repositions that controversial 2010 Supreme Court decision as the capstone of a centuries-old battle for corporate personhood. "Tackling a topic that ought to be at the heart of political debate" (Economist), Winkler surveys more than four hundred years of diverse cases--and the contributions of such legendary legal figures as Daniel Webster, Roger Taney, Lewis Powell, and even Thurgood Marshall--to reveal that "the history of corporate rights is replete with ironies" (Wall Street Journal). We the Corporations is an uncompromising work of history to be read for years to come.