Writing and Power in the Roman World


Author: Hella Eckardt
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108418058
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9505
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book focuses on the material practice of ancient literacy through a contextual examination of Roman writing equipment.

Philosophy and Power in the Graeco-Roman World

Essays in Honour of Miriam Griffin
Author: Miriam Tamara Griffin,Gillian Clark,Tessa Rajak
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780198299905
Category: Religion
Page: 348
View: 8028
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This volume in honour of Miriam Griffin brings together seventeen international specialists. Their essays range from Socrates to late antiquity, with a particular focus on Cicero. Subjects covered include the Stoics and Cynics, Roman law, the formulation of imperial power, Jews and Christians, 'performance philosophy', Augustine, late Platonism, and women philosophers.

Literacy and Power in the Ancient World


Author: Alan K. Bowman,Greg Woolf
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521587365
Category: History
Page: 249
View: 7082
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Was writing a revolutionary innovation, prompting or participating in social change, or a fundamentally repressive and disciplinary technology? The book consists of a series of studies ranging over the whole of the Mediterranean world and much of northern Europe during a period of more than a millennium (c. 600 BC-AD 800).

The Politics of Latin Literature

Writing, Identity, and Empire in Ancient Rome
Author: Thomas N. Habinek
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400822515
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 7390
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This is the first book to describe the intimate relationship between Latin literature and the politics of ancient Rome. Until now, most scholars have viewed classical Latin literature as a product of aesthetic concerns. Thomas Habinek shows, however, that literature was also a cultural practice that emerged from and intervened in the political and social struggles at the heart of the Roman world. Habinek considers major works by such authors as Cato, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Seneca. He shows that, from its beginnings in the late third century b.c. to its eclipse by Christian literature six hundred years later, classical literature served the evolving interests of Roman and, more particularly, aristocratic power. It fostered a prestige dialect, for example; it appropriated the cultural resources of dominated and colonized communities; and it helped to defuse potentially explosive challenges to prevailing values and authority. Literature also drew upon and enhanced other forms of social authority, such as patriarchy, religious ritual, cultural identity, and the aristocratic procedure of self-scrutiny, or existimatio. Habinek's analysis of the relationship between language and power in classical Rome breaks from the long Romantic tradition of viewing Roman authors as world-weary figures, aloof from mundane political concerns--a view, he shows, that usually reflects how scholars have seen themselves. The Politics of Latin Literature will stimulate new interest in the historical context of Latin literature and help to integrate classical studies into ongoing debates about the sociology of writing.

Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World

Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice
Author: Elizabeth A. Meyer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139449113
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 5874
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Greeks wrote mostly on papyrus, but the Romans wrote solemn religious, public and legal documents on wooden tablets often coated with wax. This book investigates the historical significance of this resonant form of writing; its power to order the human realm and cosmos and to make documents efficacious; its role in court; the uneven spread - an aspect of Romanization - of this Roman form outside Italy, as provincials made different guesses as to what would please their Roman overlords; and its influence on the evolution of Roman law. An historical epoch of Roman legal transactions without writing is revealed as a juristic myth of origins. Roman legal documents on tablets are the ancestors of today's dispositive legal documents - the document as the act itself. In a world where knowledge of the Roman law was scarce - and enforcers scarcer - the Roman law drew its authority from a wider world of belief.

The Religion of Senators in the Roman Empire

Power and the Beyond
Author: Zsuzsanna Várhelyi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139487612
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7484
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book examines the connection between political and religious power in the pagan Roman Empire through a study of senatorial religion. Presenting a new collection of historical, epigraphic, prosopographic and material evidence, it argues that as Augustus turned to religion to legitimize his powers, senators in turn also came to negotiate their own power, as well as that of the emperor, partly in religious terms. In Rome, the body of the senate and priesthoods helped to maintain the religious power of the senate; across the Empire senators defined their magisterial powers by following the model of emperors and by relying on the piety of sacrifice and benefactions. The ongoing participation and innovations of senators confirm the deep ability of imperial religion to engage the normative, symbolic and imaginative aspects of religious life among senators.

Gender in the Early Medieval World

East and West, 300-900
Author: Leslie Brubaker,Julia M. H. Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521013277
Category: History
Page: 333
View: 5819
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Gender analysis is one of the most probing ways to understand both power and cultural strategies in pre-industrial societies. In this book, first published in 2004, sixteen scholars on the cutting edges of their disciplines explore the ideas and expressions of gender that characterised the centuries from c. 300 to 900 in milieux ranging from York to Baghdad, via Rome and Constantinople. Deploying a variety of disciplines and perspectives, they draw on the evidence of material culture as well as texts to demonstrate the wide range of gender identities that informed the social, political and imaginary worlds of these centuries. The essays make clear that the fixed point in the gender systems of the period was constituted by the hegemonic masculinity of the ruling elite, marginalised groups often invisible as historical subjects in their own right were omnipresent in, and critical to, the gendered discourses which buttressed assertions of power.

The Prince of Medicine

Galen in the Roman Empire
Author: Susan P. Mattern
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0199605459
Category: Medical
Page: 368
View: 6397
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The first ever authoritative biography of Galen of Pergamum A.D. (129 - 216) - prodigious polymath, philosopher, shameless self-promoter, caustic wit and polemicist, and the single most influential figure in the history of western medicine from Roman times to the twentieth century.

Literature in the Roman World


Author: Oliver Taplin
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780192893017
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 293
View: 6395
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This collection of essays has been written with a fresh approach to the literature from the beginning of the Roman Empire to the end of the classical era, drawing on the most recent research. Edited by Oliver Taplin, a distinguished classicist, this collection seeks to examine the major works of this period within their contemporary cultural context, and to identify their intended audience and readership.

Tales of the Barbarians

Ethnography and Empire in the Roman West
Author: Greg Woolf
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444390803
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 192
View: 823
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Tales of the Barbarians traces the creation of new mythologies in the wake of Roman expansion westward to the Atlantic, and offers the first application of modern ethnographic theory to ancient material. Investigates the connections between empire and knowledge at the turn of the millennia, and the creation of new histories in the Roman West Explores how ancient geography, local histories and the stories of wandering heroes were woven together by Greek scholars and local experts Offers a fresh perspective by examining passages from ancient writers in a new light

Marriage and Family in the Biblical World


Author: Ken M. Campbell
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 9780830827374
Category: Religion
Page: 284
View: 3027
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Ken M. Campbell presents the work of six scholars who map varying understandings of marriage and family in six cultural settings: Victor H. Matthews on the ancient Near East, Daniel I. Block on ancient Israel, S. M. Baugh on Greek society, Susan M. Treggiari on Roman society, David W. Chapman on Second Temple Judaism and Andreas Kstenberger on the New Testament era.

Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World

A Sourcebook
Author: Ross Shepard Kraemer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199725830
Category: History
Page: 520
View: 9942
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This is a substantially expanded and completely revised edition of a book originally published in 1988 as Maenads, Martyrs, Matrons, Monastics. The book is a collection of translations of primary texts relevant to women's religion in Western antiquity, from the fourth century BCE to the fifth century CE. The selections are taken from the plethora of ancient religions, including Judaism and Christianity, and are translated from the six major languages of the Greco-Roman world: Greek, Latin, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, and Coptic. The texts are grouped thematically in six sections: Observances, Rituals, and Festivals; Researching Real Women: Documents to, from and by Women; Religious Office; New Religious Affiliation and Conversion; Holy, Pious, and Exemplary Women; and The Feminine Divine. Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World provides a unique and invaluable resource for scholars of classical antiquity, early Christianity and Judaism, and women's religion more generally.

State Power in Ancient China and Rome


Author: Walter Scheidel
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190202246
Category: History
Page: 303
View: 5692
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Chinese and the Romans created the largest empires of the ancient world. Separated by thousands of miles of steppe, mountains and sea, these powerful states developed independently and with very limited awareness of each other's existence. This parallel process of state formation served as a massive natural experiment in social evolution that provides unique insight into the complexities of historical causation. Comparisons between the two empires shed new light on the factors that led to particular outcomes and help us understand similarities and differences in ancient state formation. The explicitly comparative perspective adopted in this volume opens up a dialogue between scholars from different areas of specialization, encouraging them to address big questions about the nature of imperial rule. In a series of interlocking case studies, leading experts of early China and the ancient Mediterranean explore the relationship between rulers and elite groups, the organization and funding of government, and the ways in which urban development reflected the interplay between state power and communal civic institutions.0Bureaucratization, famously associated with Qin and Han China but long less prominent in the Roman world, receives special attention as an index of the ambitions and capabilities of kings and emperors. The volume concludes with a look at the preconditions for the emergence of divine rulership. Taken together, these pioneering contributions lay the foundations for a systematic comparative history of early empires.

Writing Rome

Textual Approaches to the City
Author: Catharine Edwards
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521559522
Category: History
Page: 146
View: 533
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"The city of Rome is built not only of bricks and marble but also of the words of its writers". Through the words of classical authors, the myths and memory of the place, and later writers such as Gibbon and Goethe, Edwards examines the literary topography of Rome. The author achieves a balance between minute details of life in the city with discussion of its mythic aspects reflected in literature. A little book but full of interesting material.

Culture and Identity in Early Modern Europe (1500-1800)

Essays in Honor of Natalie Zemon Davis
Author: Barbara B. Diefendorf,Carla Alison Hesse
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472104703
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 697
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Explores Natalie Zemon Davis's concept of history as a dialogue, not only with the past, but with other historians.

Political Thought and the Realities of Power in the Middle Ages


Author: Joseph Canning,Otto Gerhard Oexle
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
ISBN: 9783525354629
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 6530
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome


Author: Brian Campbell
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 080786904X
Category: History
Page: 608
View: 5726
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Figuring in myth, religion, law, the military, commerce, and transportation, rivers were at the heart of Rome's increasing exploitation of the environment of the Mediterranean world. In Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome, Brian Campbell explores the role and influence of rivers and their surrounding landscape on the society and culture of the Roman Empire. Examining artistic representations of rivers, related architecture, and the work of ancient geographers and topographers, as well as writers who describe rivers, Campbell reveals how Romans defined the geographical areas they conquered and how geography and natural surroundings related to their society and activities. In addition, he illuminates the prominence and value of rivers in the control and expansion of the Roman Empire--through the legal regulation of riverine activities, the exploitation of rivers in military tactics, and the use of rivers as routes of communication and movement. Campbell shows how a technological understanding of--and even mastery over--the forces of the river helped Rome rise to its central place in the ancient world.

Sage and Emperor

Plutarch, Greek Intellectuals, and Roman Power in the Time of Trajan (98-117 A.D.)
Author: Philip A. Stadter,L. Van der Stockt
Publisher: Leuven University Press
ISBN: 9789058672391
Category: History
Page: 357
View: 6505
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The overall objective is to establish the context of Plutarch's work in the society and the historical circumstances for which it was written.

Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome

An Anthology
Author: Ian Michael Plant
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806136219
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 268
View: 5765
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Despite a common perception that most writing in antiquity was produced by men, some important literature written by women during this period has survived. Edited by I. M. Plant, Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome is a comprehensive anthology of the surviving literary texts of women writers from the Graeco-Roman world that offers new English translations from the works of more than fifty women. From Sappho, who lived in the seventh century B.C., to Eudocia and Egeria of the fifth century A.D., the texts presented here come from a wide range of sources and span the fields of poetry and prose. Each author is introduced with a critical review of what we know about the writer, her work, and its significance, along with a discussion of the texts that follow. A general introduction looks into the problem of the authenticity of some texts attributed to women and places their literature into the wider literary and social contexts of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

Greek Literature in the Roman Empire


Author: Jason Konig
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1472521315
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 128
View: 5727
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this book Jason Konig offers for the first time an accessible yet comprehensive account of the multi-faceted Greek literature of the Roman Empire, focusing especially on the first three centuries AD. He covers in turn the Greek novels of this period, the satirical writing of Lucian, rhetoric, philosophy, scientific and miscellanistic writing, geography and history, biography and poetry, providing a vivid introduction to key texts, with extensive quotation in translation. The challenges and pleasures these texts offer to their readers have come to be newly appreciated in the classical scholarship of the last two or three decades. In addition there has been renewed interest in the role played by novelistic and rhetorical writing in the Greek culture of the Roman Empire more broadly, and in the many different ways in which these texts respond to the world around them. This volume offers a broad introduction to those exciting developments.