A History of Rome under the Emperors

But the work that would have concluded his history of Rome - which ran to the reign of Augustus - was never completed. This book represents that great lost work.

Author: Theodor Mommsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134624782

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 464

Download →

This book caused a sensation when it was published in Germany in 1992, and was front page news in many newspapers. For readers of English, it will be an authoritative survey of four centuries of Roman history, and a unique window on the German tradition of the last century. Theodor Mommsen (d. 1903) was one of the greatest Roman historians of the nineteenth century, and the only one ever to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. His fame rests on his History of Rome as well as his work on Roman law and on the Roman provinces. But the work that would have concluded his history of Rome - which ran to the reign of Augustus - was never completed. This book represents that great lost work. In 1980 Alexander Demandt discovered in an antiquarian bookshop a full and detailed handwritten transcript of the lectures on the Roman Empire, which Mommsen gave for many years from 1863 to 1886, made by two of his students. This transcript has been edited to provide the authoritative reconstruction of the book Mommsen never wrote, A History of Rome Under the Emperors. Barbara and Alexander Demandt have carefully edited the text and provided detailed annotation and explanatory references. For the English edition, Professor Thomas Wiedemann has written an introduction which surveys Mommsen's position and influence in nineteenth century German scholarship and introduces his work for English speaking readers.
Posted in:

A History of Rome Under the Emperors

... Emperors recede into the background, partly because they are relatively unimportant in terms of the historical process, ... A) THE EMPEROR AND THE COURT It is unhelpful to see the Roman principate as a straightforward monarchy. On ...

Author: Theodor Mommsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134624799

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 224

Download →

This book caused a sensation when it was published in Germany in 1992, and was front page news in many newspapers. For readers of English, it will be an authoritative survey of four centuries of Roman history, and a unique window on the German tradition of the last century. Theodor Mommsen (d. 1903) was one of the greatest Roman historians of the nineteenth century, and the only one ever to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. His fame rests on his History of Rome as well as his work on Roman law and on the Roman provinces. But the work that would have concluded his history of Rome - which ran to the reign of Augustus - was never completed. This book represents that great lost work. In 1980 Alexander Demandt discovered in an antiquarian bookshop a full and detailed handwritten transcript of the lectures on the Roman Empire, which Mommsen gave for many years from 1863 to 1886, made by two of his students. This transcript has been edited to provide the authoritative reconstruction of the book Mommsen never wrote, A History of Rome Under the Emperors. Barbara and Alexander Demandt have carefully edited the text and provided detailed annotation and explanatory references. For the English edition, Professor Thomas Wiedemann has written an introduction which surveys Mommsen's position and influence in nineteenth century German scholarship and introduces his work for English speaking readers.
Posted in:

The Fall of the Roman Empire A New History of Rome and the Barbarians

Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long ...

Author: Peter Heather

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195159543

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 737

Download →

The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long. A leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians, Heather relates the extraordinary story of how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled the empire apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic balance of power on Rome's European frontiers, to force the Goths and others to seek refuge inside the Empire. This prompted two generations of struggle, during which new barbarian coalitions, formed in response to Roman hostility, brought the Roman west to its knees. The Goths first destroyed a Roman army at the battle of Hadrianople in 378, and went on to sack Rome in 410. The Vandals spread devastation in Gaul and Spain, before conquering North Africa, the breadbasket of the Western Empire, in 439. We then meet Attila the Hun, whose reign of terror swept from Constantinople to Paris, but whose death in 453 ironically precipitated a final desperate phase of Roman collapse, culminating in the Vandals' defeat of the massive Byzantine Armada: the west's last chance for survival. Peter Heather convincingly argues that the Roman Empire was not on the brink of social or moral collapse. What brought it to an end were the barbarians.
Posted in:

The Romans For Dummies

If you’ve tuned into any of several TV shows focused on Rome and want to learn more about this fascinating part of history, The Romans For Dummies is the book for you.

Author: Guy de la Bedoyere

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470030776

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 359

Download →

"A must for anyone interested in the Roman Empire and its impact on world history." —Tony Robinson star of Blackadder and Time Team. This entertaining and informative guide introduces readers to the amazing world of ancient Rome and its emperors, epic wars, awesome architecture, heroes, and villains. With a complete rundown of Roman history alongside fascinating insights into the lives of everyday Romans, readers will discover the amazing people and events involved in the rise and fall of one of the greatest of all ancient civilisations and how its influence can still be felt around the world today. Guy de la Bédoyère is a historian, archaeologist, and Roman expert, he is well known for his numerous books and appearances on TV, especially Channel 4’s Time Team.
Posted in:

A History of the Roman Empire From its Foundation to the Death of Marcus Aurelius 27 B C 180 A D

This extraordinary work on Roman history by J.B. Bury covers the period of more than 200 years from the time of Julius Caesar until the end of Marcus Aurelius' reign.

Author: John Bagnell Bury

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4057664134592

Category: History

Page: 564

View: 981

Download →

This extraordinary work on Roman history by J.B. Bury covers the period of more than 200 years from the time of Julius Caesar until the end of Marcus Aurelius' reign. Through the 30 chapters of this book, readers will gain a complete insight into the political history of the golden age of the Roman Empire. Contents: From the Battle of Actium to the Foundation of the Principate The Principate The Joint Government of the Princeps and Senate The Family of Augustus and His Plans to Found a Dynasty Administration of Augustus in Rome and Italy — Organisation of the Army Provincial Administration Under Augustus — the Western Provinces Provincial Administration Under Augustus — the Eastern Provinces and Egypt Rome and Parthia — Expeditions to Arabia and Ethiopia The Winning and Losing of Germany — Death of Augustus Rome Under Augustus — His Buildings Literature of the Augustan Age The Principate of Tiberius (14-37 A.D.) The Principate of Gaius (Caligula) (37-41 A.D.) The Principate of Claudius (41-54 A.D.) The Conquest of Britain The Principate of Nero (54-68 A.D.) The Wars for Armenia, Under Claudius and Nero The Principate of Galba, and the Year of the Four Emperors (68-69 A.D.) Rebellions in Germany and Judea The Flavian Emperors — Vespasian, Titus and Domitian (69-96 A.D.) Britain and Germany Under the Flavians — Dacian War Nerva and Trajan — the Conquest of Dacia Literature From the Death of Tiberius to Trajan The Principate of Hadrian (117-138 A.D.) The Principate of Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.) The Principate of Marcus Aurelius (161-180 A.D.) Literature Under Hadrian and the Antonines The Roman World Under the Empire — Politics, Philosophy, Religion and Art Roman Life and Manners
Posted in:

The History of Rome Rise and Fall of the Empire

This eBook edition of "The History of Rome" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices.

Author: John Bagnell Bury

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4064066051570

Category: History

Page: 1552

View: 898

Download →

This eBook edition of "The History of Rome" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Content: The Principate The Joint Government of the Princeps and Senate The Family of Augustus and His Plans to Found a Dynasty Rome and Parthia The Winning and Losing of Germany Rome Under Augustus Literature of the Augustan Age The Principate of Tiberius The Principate of Gaius Caligula The Principate of Claudius The Conquest of Britain The Principate of Nero The Wars for Armenia The Principate of Galba, and the Year of the Four Emperors Rebellions in Germany and Judea The Flavian Emperors Britain and Germany Under the Flavians Nerva and Trajan — the Conquest of Dacia Literature From the Death of Tiberius to Trajan The Principate of Hadrian The Principate of Antoninus Pius The Principate of Marcus Aurelius Literature Under Hadrian and the Antonines The Roman World Under the Empire — Politics, Philosophy, Religion and Art Roman Life and Manners Decline and the Last Years of the Roman Empire The Constitution of the Monarchy The Administrative Machinery Constantinople The Neighbours of the Empire at the End of the Fourth Century The Supremacy of Stilicho The German Invasions Under Honorius Theodosius II and Marcian The Dismemberment of the Empire in the West The Empire of Attila Leo I and Ricimer's Rule in Italy Church and State The Reign of Zeno, and the German Viceroyalty in Italy The Reign of Anastasius I and the Viceroyalty of Theoderic The Empire and Persia Justin I and Justinian I The Persian Wars The Reconquest of Africa The Reconquest of Italy Diplomacy and Commerce Administrative Reforms and Finance Ecclesiastical Policy The Legislative Work of Justinian Procopius
Posted in:

The Emperor in the Roman World 31 BC AD 337

Focusing on the three centuries from Augustus to Constantine, the author analyzes the Roman emperor's functions, the social realities behind his exercise of power, and his communication with his subjects

Author: Fergus Millar

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015000032972

Category: Social Science

Page: 657

View: 663

Download →

Focusing on the three centuries from Augustus to Constantine, the author analyzes the Roman emperor's functions, the social realities behind his exercise of power, and his communication with his subjects
Posted in:

Ancient Rome

"Focusing on six momentous turning points that helped to shape Roman history, Simon Baker's gripping narrative charts the rise and fall of the world's first superpower - a political machine unmatched in its brutality, its genius, its lust ...

Author: Simon Baker

Publisher: Ebury Press

ISBN: PSU:000066094371

Category: History

Page: 447

View: 594

Download →

"Focusing on six momentous turning points that helped to shape Roman history, Simon Baker's gripping narrative charts the rise and fall of the world's first superpower - a political machine unmatched in its brutality, its genius, its lust for power." --DUST JACKET.
Posted in:

Constructing Autocracy

In this compelling book, Matthew Roller reveals a dialogical process at work, in which writers and philosophers vigorously negotiated and contested the nature and scope of the emperor's authority, despite the consensus that he was the ...

Author: Matthew B. Roller

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 069105021X

Category: History

Page: 319

View: 195

Download →

Rome's transition from a republican system of government to an imperial regime comprised more than a century of civil upheaval and rapid institutional change. Yet the establishment of a ruling dynasty, centered around a single leader, came as a cultural and political shock to Rome's aristocracy, who had shared power in the previous political order. How did the imperial regime manage to establish itself and how did the Roman elites from the time of Julius Caesar to Nero make sense of it? In this compelling book, Matthew Roller reveals a dialogical process at work, in which writers and philosophers vigorously negotiated and contested the nature and scope of the emperor's authority, despite the consensus that he was the ultimate authority figure in Roman society. Roller seeks evidence for this thinking out of the new order in a wide range of republican and imperial authors, with an emphasis on Lucan and Seneca the Younger. He shows how elites assessed the impact of the imperial system on traditional aristocratic ethics and examines how several longstanding authority relationships in Roman society--those of master to slave, father to son, and gift-creditor to gift-debtor--became competing models for how the emperor did or should relate to his aristocratic subjects. By revealing this ideological activity to be not merely reactive but also constitutive of the new order, Roller contributes to ongoing debates about the character of the Roman imperial system and about the politics of literature.
Posted in:

A Companion to the Roman Empire

It provides readers with a guide both to Roman imperial history and to the field of Roman studies. The individual contributors to this volume all make significant new contributions to the areas about which they are writing.

Author: David S. Potter

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405199186

Category: History

Page: 691

View: 451

Download →

A Companion to the Roman Empire provides readers with a guide both to Roman imperial history and to the field of Roman studies, taking account of the most recent discoveries. This Companion brings together thirty original essays guiding readers through Roman imperial history and the field of Roman studies Shows that Roman imperial history is a compelling and vibrant subject Includes significant new contributions to various areas of Roman imperial history Covers the social, intellectual, economic and cultural history of the Roman Empire Contains an extensive bibliography
Posted in:

Emperors of Rome

This book is different because it is based on primary sources and evidence - and attempts to balance out the shocking with any mitigating aspects in each of their lives.

Author: Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

ISBN: 1526728850

Category:

Page: 128

View: 245

Download →

As with everything else, there were good and bad Roman emperors. The good, like Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138), Antoninus Pius (138-161) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180) were largely civilized and civilizing. The bad, on the other hand, were sometimes nothing less than monsters, exhibiting varying degrees of corruption, cruelty, depravity and insanity. It is a sobering thought that these ogres were responsible for governing the greatest civilization in the world, simultaneously terrorizing, brutalizing and massacring. Tiberius, Caligula, Nero, Domitian, Commodus, Caracella, Elagabalus, Septimius Severus, Diocletian, Maximinus Thrax, Justinian and Theodora all had more bad days than good; they are all covered in this book. Their exploits have, of course, been well documented since classical times but much of the coverage can only be called gratuitous, sensationalist or tabloid. This book is different because it is based on primary sources and evidence - and attempts to balance out the shocking with any mitigating aspects in each of their lives. Many of our monsters have some redeeming factors and it is important that these are exposed if a true record of their lives is to be conveyed. The book also examines how each of the twelve has been treated for posterity in literature, theatre and film, and the lessons intended to be drawn from popular culture through the ages.
Posted in:

A History of Roman Art

This edition features more maps and illustrations, in-depth analysis of iconography, greater emphasis on the types of objects used to decorate the lives of ordinary Romans, expanded coverage of freedmen and women as artists, subjects, and ...

Author: Steven L. Tuck

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119653288

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 950

Download →

A HISTORY OF ROMAN ART The new edition of the leading textbook on Roman art, updated with new images and expanded geographic and cultural scope A History of Roman Art is an expansive survey of the painting, mosaic, sculpture, decorative arts, and architecture of ancient Rome. This acclaimed textbook provides a fully-illustrated narrative history of Roman art that spans a millennium, from the early origins of Rome to the era of Emperor Constantine. Interwoven throughout the text are themes of Rome’s cultural inclusiveness and the importance of art in promoting Roman values, helping students understand how diverse cultures contributed to Roman life. Accessible, chronologically-organized chapters provide numerous examples of the arts, their cultural and historical context, descriptions of artistic techniques, and writings by ancient authors—enabling students to develop a rich appreciation of art’s importance in the Roman world. Now in its second edition, this market-leading textbook features thoroughly revised content throughout. Additional images and excerpts from literary sources are complemented by new historical discussions of metalwork, carved gems, glass, and sarcophagi. This edition features more maps and illustrations, in-depth analysis of iconography, greater emphasis on the types of objects used to decorate the lives of ordinary Romans, expanded coverage of freedmen and women as artists, subjects, and patrons, and much more. A number of works that represent popular art have been added. That is, art in the everyday Roman world, rather than just the large scale works of sculpture and architecture of elite patrons. It also reveals patterns of artistic workshops, trade, and social and economic networks. Additionally, this edition takes into account new approaches in scholarship. This comprehensive textbook: Provides a thorough introduction to Roman art history featuring more than 400 high quality images and illustrations Includes a full set of pedagogical tools, such as historical timelines, key term definitions, and updated references and further reading suggestions Offers “Scholarly Perspective,” “A View from the Provinces,” “More on Myth,” and “Art and Literature” textboxes in each chapter Includes a companion website containing PowerPoint slides and additional instructor resources A History of Roman Art, Second Edition is an ideal primary or secondary text for courses on Roman art and archaeology, Roman art and architecture, Greek and Roman art, and general Roman civilization, history, and culture.
Posted in:

The Great Illyrian Revolt

Appianus, The Roman History, book 9, appendix on the Illyrian Wars, chapters 12, 25; Aleksandar Stipčević, The Illyrians: History and Culture. ... Theodor Mommsen, A History of Rome under the Emperors (London, Routledge, 1996), 65-71.

Author: Jason R. Abdale

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781526718198

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 688

Download →

The little-known story of a fierce rebellion against the Romans:“A very good read for anyone interested in ancient military history and historiography.” —The NYMAS Review In the year AD 9, three Roman legions were crushed by the German warlord Arminius in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. This event is well known, but there was another uprising that Rome faced shortly before, which lasted from AD 6 to 9, and was just as intense. This rebellion occurred in the western Balkans—an area roughly corresponding to modern Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Montenegro, and parts of Serbia and Albania—and it tested the Roman Empire to its limits. For three years, fifteen legions fought in the narrow valleys and forest-covered crags of the Dinaric Mountains in a ruthless war of attrition against an equally ruthless and determined foe, and yet this conflict is largely unknown today. The Great Illyrian Revolt is believed to be the first book ever devoted to this forgotten war of the Roman Empire. Within its pages, we examine the history and culture of the mysterious Illyrian people, the story of how Rome became involved in this volatile region, and what the Roman army had to face during those harrowing three years in the Balkans.
Posted in:

The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome

More than fifteen centuries after its fall, the Roman Empire remains one of the most formative influences on the history of Europe.

Author: Chris Scarre

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0140513299

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 553

Download →

More than fifteen centuries after its fall, the Roman Empire remains one of the most formative influences on the history of Europe. Its physical remains dot the landscape from Scotland to Syria. Its cities are still the great metropolises of the continent. Its law and institutions have shaped modern practice, and its ideal of a united Europe has haunted politicians ever since. Fully illustrated and featuring more than sixty full- colour maps, this atlas traces the rise and fall of the first great multinational state. It looks at its provinces and cities, its trade and economy, its armies and frontier defences; follows its foreign ward and internecine struggles; and charts its transformation into a Christian theocracy and its fall in 476.
Posted in: