Historical Dictionary of American Theater

Seilhamer, George O. History of the American Theatre, 3 vols. ... works as Dunlap's A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 is essential, ...

Author: James Fisher

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780810878334

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 570

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The Historical Dictionary of American Theater: Beginnings covers the history of early American Theatre through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1000 cross-referenced entries on actors and actresses, directors, playwrights, producers, genres, notable plays and theatres. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the early American Theater.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 15

In our time as in Dunlap's, it's not us against them. ... introduction to William Dunlap, A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 ...

Author: M. Scott Phillips

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817354572

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 139

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The essays gathered together in Volume 15 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium investigate how, historically, the theatre has been perceived both as a source of moral anxiety and as an instrument of moral and social reform. Essays consider, among other subjects, ethnographic depictions of the savage “other” in Buffalo Bill’s engagement at the Columbian Exposition of 1893; the so-called “Moral Reform Melodrama” in the nineteenth century; charity theatricals and the ways they negotiated standards of middle-class respectability; the figure of the courtesan as a barometer of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century moral and sexual discourse; Aphra Behn’s subversion of Restoration patriarchal sexual norms in The Feigned Courtesans; and the controversy surrounding one production of Tony Kushner Angels in America, during which officials at one of the nation’s more prominent liberal arts colleges attempted to censor the production, a chilling reminder that academic and artistic freedom cannot be taken for granted in today’s polarized moral and political atmosphere.
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The Cambridge Companion to African American Theatre

Also see Hugh F. Rankin, The Theater in Colonial America (Chapel Hill: ... William Dunlap, A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832, ed.

Author: Harvey Young

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107017122

Category: Drama

Page: 291

View: 477

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With contributions from the leading scholars in the field, this Companion provides a comprehensive and accessible overview of African American theatre, from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Along the way, it chronicles the evolution of African American theatre and its engagement with the wider community.
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The Cambridge Companion to American Gothic

In A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832, he describes the success of his translations from the German Romantic playwright Kotzebue's ...

Author: Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107117143

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 971

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This Companion offers a thorough overview of the diversity of the American Gothic tradition from its origins to the present.
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Working in the Wings

New Perspectives on Theatre History and Labor Elizabeth A. Osborne, ... A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 (New York: J. and J.

Author: Elizabeth A. Osborne

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809334209

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 246

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Theatre has long been an art form of subterfuge and concealment. Working in the Wings: New Perspectives on Theatre History and Labor, edited by Elizabeth A. Osborne and Christine Woodworth, brings attention to what goes on behind the scenes, challenging, and revising our understanding of work, theatre, and history. Essays consider a range of historic moments and geographic locations—from African Americans’ performance of the cakewalk in Florida’s resort hotels during the Gilded Age to the UAW Union Theatre and striking automobile workers in post–World War II Detroit, to the struggle in the latter part of the twentieth century to finish an adaptation of Moby Dick for the stage before the memory of creator Rinde Eckert failed. Contributors incorporate methodologies and theories from fields as diverse as theatre history, work studies, legal studies, economics, and literature and draw on traditional archival materials, including performance texts and architectural structures, as well as less tangible material traces of stagecraft. Working in the Wings looks at the ways in which workers' identities are shaped, influenced, and dictated by what they do; the traces left behind by workers whose contributions have been overwritten; the intersections between the sometimes repetitive and sometimes destructive process of creation and the end result—the play or performance; and the ways in which theatre affects the popular imagination. This collected volume draws attention to the significance of work in the theatre, encouraging a fresh examination of this important subject in the history of the theatre and beyond.
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America s Indomitable Character Volume II

A History of the American Theater from its Origins to 1832, typeset from the 1832 edition by J. and J. Harper, New York; University of Illinois, ...

Author: Frederick William Dame

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783735746276

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 696

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Volume II of America's Indomitable Character has information on: A synopsis of Volume I. A preview concerning the content of Volume II with the sub-themes of Nature, human nature, society, the social contract, and education and how they weave into American character identity. American character identity and its Colonial connection to the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. The historical personage Michel Guillaume (J. Hector St. John) de Crèvecoeur, a French, British, American Colonial citizen, and the America farmer par excellence who posed the famous question: What is an American? Benjamin Franklin's contributions to the developing American character identity. Thomas Paine's revolutionary views on American character identity. Thomas Jefferson's philosophical contributions to American character identity. John Dickinson, America's soldier and founding father. Hugh Henry Brackenridge, American publisher and author who educated Colonial Americans in politics. The literary group the Connecticut Wits who were both for and against America's independent development. The role of Colonial Religion and early attitudes concerning the American Colonial Theater as they relate to American character identity. The American dramatist and jurist Royall Tyler and his play The Contrast (A Comedy in Five Acts) in which the newly developing American consciousness of independence, including female independence, vis-à-vis English foppery and buffoonery are presented. Further, the use of the Native American's chanson du mort, in this case the Song of Alknomook and the dramaturgical presentation of Yankee Doodle are of utmost importance in understanding The Contrast and how they interplay with American character identity. The Albany Plan of Union. The Declaration of Independence written by the Founding Fathers. The Articles of Confederation (and Perpetual Union). A chronology of theatrical events between 1600 and 1800.
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Spectacle Culture and American Identity 1815 1940

William Dunlap, A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 University ofIllinois Press, 2005),363. Painter Benjamin West influenced Dunlap.

Author: S. Tenneriello

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137360625

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 316

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Scenic spectacles collapse the borders of graphic and visual arts, multimedia technology, spectatorship and architecture. Drawing upon various systems of commercial, institutional and public spectacle that intersect with scenic stages of the national landscape, Tenneriello examines how spectacle is entrenched in the formation of national identity.
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The Contrast

A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832, ed. Tice L. Miller. 1832; Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005. Elliott, Emory.

Author: Royall Tyler

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814747926

Category: Drama

Page: 147

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“The Contrast“, which premiered at New York City's John Street Theater in 1787, was the first American play performed in public by a professional theater company. The play, written by New England-born, Harvard-educated, Royall Tyler was timely, funny, and extremely popular. When the play appeared in print in 1790, George Washington himself appeared at the head of its list of hundreds of subscribers. Reprinted here with annotated footnotes by historian Cynthia A. Kierner, Tyler’s play explores the debate over manners, morals, and cultural authority in the decades following American Revolution. Did the American colonists' rejection of monarchy in 1776 mean they should abolish all European social traditions and hierarchies? What sorts of etiquette, amusements, and fashions were appropriate and beneficial? Most important, to be a nation, did Americans need to distinguish themselves from Europeans—and, if so, how? Tyler was not the only American pondering these questions, and Kierner situates the play in its broader historical and cultural contexts. An extensive introduction provides readers with a background on life and politics in the United States in 1787, when Americans were in the midst of nation-building. The book also features a section with selections from contemporary letters, essays, novels, conduct books, and public documents, which debate issues of the era.
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The Social History of the American Family

A History of American Theatre From Its Origins to 1832. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005. Frick, JohnW. Theatre, Culture and Temperance Reformin ...

Author: Marilyn J. Coleman

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781483370422

Category: Social Science

Page: 2144

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The American family has come a long way from the days of the idealized family portrayed in iconic television shows of the 1950s and 1960s. The four volumes of The Social History of the American Family explore the vital role of the family as the fundamental social unit across the span of American history. Experiences of family life shape so much of an individual’s development and identity, yet the patterns of family structure, family life, and family transition vary across time, space, and socioeconomic contexts. Both the definition of who or what counts as family and representations of the “ideal” family have changed over time to reflect changing mores, changing living standards and lifestyles, and increased levels of social heterogeneity. Available in both digital and print formats, this carefully balanced academic work chronicles the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of American families from the colonial period to the present. Key themes include families and culture (including mass media), families and religion, families and the economy, families and social issues, families and social stratification and conflict, family structures (including marriage and divorce, gender roles, parenting and children, and mixed and non-modal family forms), and family law and policy. Features: Approximately 600 articles, richly illustrated with historical photographs and color photos in the digital edition, provide historical context for students. A collection of primary source documents demonstrate themes across time. The signed articles, with cross references and Further Readings, are accompanied by a Reader’s Guide, Chronology of American Families, Resource Guide, Glossary, and thorough index. The Social History of the American Family is an ideal reference for students and researchers who want to explore political and social debates about the importance of the family and its evolving constructions.
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Staging Family

A History of the American Theater from Its Origins to 1832. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005. Ehnenn, Jill. “'An Attractive Dramatic Exhibition'?

Author: Nan Mullenneaux

Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496210913

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 601

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Breaking every prescription of ideal femininity, American actresses of the mid-nineteenth century appeared in public alongside men, financially supported nuclear and extended families, challenged domestic common law, and traveled the globe in the transnational theater market. While these women expanded professional, artistic, and geographic frontiers, they expanded domestic frontiers as well: publicly, actresses used the traditional rhetoric of domesticity to mask their very nontraditional personal lives, instigating historically significant domestic innovations to circumvent the gender constraints of the mid-nineteenth century, reinventing themselves and their families in the process. Nan Mullenneaux focuses on the personal and professional lives of more than sixty women who, despite their diverse backgrounds, each made complex conscious and unconscious compromises to create profit and power. Mullenneaux identifies patterns of macro and micro negotiation and reinvention and maps them onto the waves of legal, economic, and social change to identify broader historical links that complicate notions of the influence of gendered power and the definition of feminism; the role of the body/embodiment in race, class, and gender issues; the relevance of family history to the achievements of influential Americans; and national versus inter- and transnational cultural trends. While Staging Family expands our understanding of how nineteenth-century actresses both negotiated power and then hid that power, it also informs contemporary questions of how women juggle professional and personal responsibilities—achieving success in spite of gender constraints and societal expectations.
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Transatlantic Abolitionism in the Age of Revolution

An International History of Anti-slavery, c.1787–1820 J. R. Oldfield ... A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 (1832; rpt. Urbana, 111.

Author: J. R. Oldfield

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107292468

Category: History

Page:

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Transatlantic Abolitionism in the Age of Revolution offers a fresh exploration of anti-slavery debates in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It challenges traditional perceptions of early anti-slavery activity as an entirely parochial British, European or American affair, and instead reframes the abolition movement as a broad international network of activists across a range of metropolitan centres and remote outposts. Interdisciplinary in approach, this book explores the dynamics of transatlantic abolitionism, along with its structure, mechanisms and business methods, and in doing so, highlights the delicate balance that existed between national and international interests in an age of massive political upheaval throughout the Atlantic world. By setting slave trade debates within a wider international context, Professor Oldfield reveals how popular abolitionism emerged as a political force in the 1780s, and how it adapted itself to the tumultuous events of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
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Men of Letters

Dunlap attended many theater performances during his stay in London; see William Dunlap, A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832, ed.

Author: Catherine O'donnell Kaplan

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 9781458722843

Category: History

Page: 460

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In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, the role of the citizen was seen as largely political. But as Catherine O'Donnell Kaplan reveals, some Americans believed that neither the nation nor they themselves could achieve virtue and happiness through politics alone. Imagining a different kind of citizenship, they founded periodicals, circulated manuscripts, and conversed about poetry, art, and the nature of man. They pondered William Godwin and Edmund Burke more carefully than they did candidates for local elections and insisted other Americans should do so as well. Kaplan looks at three groups in particular: the Friendly Club in New York City, which revolved around Elihu Hubbard Smith, with collaborators such as William Dunlap and Charles Brockden Brown; the circle around Joseph Dennie, editor of two highly successful periodicals; and the Anthologists of the Boston Athenaeum. Trough these groups, Kaplan demonstrates, an enduring and influential model of the man of letters emerged in the first decade of the nineteenth century.
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Early American Literature

A History of the American Theatre , From Its Origins to 1832 . WILLIAM DUNLAP , with an introduction by TICE L. MILLER . Urbana and Chicago : University of ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106018775616

Category: American literature

Page:

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Passionate Politics

12 13 14 A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832. Urbana : University of Illinois Press , 2005 ( 1832 ) , 201 .

Author: Ralph J. Poole

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131619848

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 247

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This new collection of essays on American stage and film melodrama assesses the multifarious and contradictory uses to which melodrama has been put in American culture from the late 18th century to the present. It focuses on the various ways in which the genre has periodically intervened in debates over race, class, gender and sexuality and, in this manner, has also persistently contributed to the formation and transformation of American nationhood: from the debates over who constitutes the newborn nation in the Early Republic, to the subsequent conflict over abolition and the discussion of gender roles at the turn of the 19th century, to the fervent class struggles of the 1930s and the critiques of domestic containment in the 1950s, as well as to ongoing debates of gender, race, and sexuality today. Addressing these issues from a variety of different angles, including historical, aesthetic, cultural, phenomenological, and psychological approaches, these essays present a complex picture of the cultural work and passionate politics accomplished by melodrama over the course of the past two centuries, particularly at times of profound social change.
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Theatre History Studies

William Dunlap , A History of the American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832 , ed . Tice L. Miller ( Urbana and Chicago : University of Illinois Press ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951D033139348

Category: Theater

Page:

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Choice

A history of the American theatre from its origins to 1832. Illinois , 2005. 444p bibl index afp ISBN 0252030303 , $ 80.00 ; ISBN 0252072855 pbk , $ 30.00 ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066043350

Category: Academic libraries

Page:

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Punch and Judy in 19th Century America

A History and Biographical Dictionary Ryan Howard ... Dunlap, A History oftheAmerican Theatrefrom Its Origin to I832, pp.

Author: Ryan Howard

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786472703

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 284

View: 124

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"The hand-puppet play starring the characters Punch and Judy was introduced from England and became popular in the U.S. in the 1800s. This book contains the record of what the author has learned about American Punch players. It explores the significance of the show as a reflection of the attitudes and conditions of its time and place"--Provided by publisher.
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American Literary Scholarship

One early national playwright's insider report , William Dunlap's A History of the American Theatre : From Its Origins to 1832 ( Illinois ) , has been newly ...

Author: James Leslie Woodress

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066260798

Category: American literature

Page:

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