Addiction and British Visual Culture 1751 919

The book examines well-known images such as William Hogarth's Gin Lane (1751), as well as lesser-known artworks including Alfred Priest's painting Cocaine (1919), in order to demonstrate how visual culture was both informed by, and ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351577489

Category: Art

Page: 200

View: 627

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Highly innovative and long overdue, this study analyzes the visual culture of addiction produced in Britain during the long nineteenth century. The book examines well-known images such as William Hogarth's Gin Lane (1751), as well as lesser-known artworks including Alfred Priest's painting Cocaine (1919), in order to demonstrate how visual culture was both informed by, and contributed to, discourses of addiction in the period between 1751 and 1919. Through her analysis of more than 30 images, Julia Skelly deconstructs beliefs and stereotypes related to addicted individuals that remain entrenched in the popular imagination today. Drawing upon both feminist and queer methodologies, as well as upon extensive archival research, Addiction and British Visual Culture, 1751-1919 investigates and problematizes the long-held belief that addiction is legible from the body, thus positioning visual images as unreliable sources in attempts to identify alcoholics and drug addicts. Examining paintings, graphic satire, photographs, advertisements and architectural sites, Skelly explores such issues as ongoing anxieties about maternal drinking; the punishment and confinement of addicted individuals; the mobility of female alcoholics through the streets and spaces of nineteenth-century London; and soldiers' use of addictive substances such as cocaine and tobacco to cope with traumatic memories following the First World War.
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Addiction and British Visual Culture 1751 1919

The book examines well-known images such as William Hogarth's Gin Lane (1751), as well as lesser-known artworks including Alfred Priest's painting Cocaine (1919), in order to demonstrate how visual culture was both informed by, and ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher:

ISBN: 1351577468

Category: Art and society

Page: 444

View: 162

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"Highly innovative and long overdue, this study analyzes the visual culture of addiction produced in Britain during the long nineteenth century. The book examines well-known images such as William Hogarth's Gin Lane (1751), as well as lesser-known artworks including Alfred Priest's painting Cocaine (1919), in order to demonstrate how visual culture was both informed by, and contributed to, discourses of addiction in the period between 1751 and 1919. Through her analysis of more than 30 images, Julia Skelly deconstructs beliefs and stereotypes related to addicted individuals that remain entrenched in the popular imagination today. Drawing upon both feminist and queer methodologies, as well as upon extensive archival research, Addiction and British Visual Culture, 1751-1919 investigates and problematizes the long-held belief that addiction is legible from the body, thus positioning visual images as unreliable sources in attempts to identify alcoholics and drug addicts. Examining paintings, graphic satire, photographs, advertisements and architectural sites, Skelly explores such issues as ongoing anxieties about maternal drinking; the punishment and confinement of addicted individuals; the mobility of female alcoholics through the streets and spaces of nineteenth-century London; and soldiers' use of addictive substances such as cocaine and tobacco to cope with traumatic memories following the First World War."--Provided by publisher.
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The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600 010

Wasted Looks: Addiction and British Visual Culture, 17511919 (Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate, 2014). Sonstroem, David. “Teeth in Victorian Art,” Victorian Literature and Culture, 29/2 (2001): 351–382. Wilde, Oscar.

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351539746

Category: Art

Page: 326

View: 643

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Directing unprecedented attention to how the idea of ?excess? has been used by both producers and consumers of visual and material culture, this collection examines the discursive construction of excess in relation to art, material goods and people in various global contexts. The contributors illuminate how excess has been perceived, quantified and constructed, revealing in the process how beliefs about excess have changed over time and how they have remained consistent. The collection as a whole underscores the fact that the concept of excess must always be considered critically, whether in scholarship or in lived experience. Although the idea of excess has often been used to shame and degrade, many of the essays in this collection demonstrate how it has also been used as a strategy for self-fashioning, transgression and empowerment, particularly by women and queer subjects. This volume examines a range of material, including diamonds, ceramics, paintings, dollhouses, caricatures, interior design and theatrical performances. Each case study sheds new light on how excess was used in a specific cultural context, including canonical sites of study such as the Netherlands in the eighteenth century, Victorian Britain and Paris in the 1920s, and under-studied contexts such as Canada and Sweden.
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The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600 2010

The Lies of Art: Max Beerbohm's Parody and Caricature (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1972). ... Skelly, Julia. Wasted Looks: Addiction and British Visual Culture, 17511919 the uses of excess in visual and material culture, ...

Author: Ms Julia Skelly

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409442370

Category: Art

Page: 300

View: 740

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Although the idea of excess has often been used to degrade, many of the essays in this collection demonstrate how it has also been used as a strategy for self-fashioning and empowerment, particularly by women and queer subjects. This volume examines a range of material - including ceramics, paintings, caricatures, interior design and theatrical performances - in various global contexts. Each case study sheds new light on how excess has been perceived and constructed, revealing how beliefs about excess have changed over time.
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The Neuropsychiatric Complications of Stimulant Abuse

The desire to fill: Addiction and British visual culture, 17511919. Thesis (Ph.D., Art History), Belfast: Queen's University, 2010-07-21 13:31:48.788. Skelly, J. (2014). Addiction and British visual culture, 17511919: Wasted looks.

Author:

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780128030035

Category: Science

Page: 402

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This well-established international series examines major areas of basic and clinical research within neuroscience, as well as emerging and promising subfields. This volume concentrates on the neuropsychiatric complications of stimulant abuse. Brings together cutting-edge research on the neuropsychiatric complications of stimulant abuse Emerging topics: stimulants, amphetamines, legal highs, designer drugs, neuropsychiatric complications.
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Skin Crafts

'Alternative Paths: Mapping Addiction in Contemporary Art by Landon Mackenzie, Rebecca Belmore, Manasie Akpaliapik, and Ron Noganosh', Journal of Canadian Studies, ... Wasted Looks: Addiction and British Visual Culture, 17511919.

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350122987

Category: Design

Page: 224

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Skin Crafts discusses multiple artists from global contexts who employ craft materials in works that address historical and contemporary violence. These artists are deliberately embracing the fragility of textiles and ceramics to evoke the vulnerability of human skin and - in so doing - are demanding visceral responses from viewers. Drawing on a range of theories including affect theory, material feminism, skin studies, phenomenology and global art history, the book illuminates the various ways in which artists are harnessing the affective power of craft materials to address and cope with violence. Artists from Mexico, Africa, China, the Netherlands and Indigenous artists based in the unceded territory known as Canada are examined in relation to one another to illuminate the connections and differences across their bodies of work. Skin Crafts interrogates ongoing material violence towards women and marginalized others, and demonstrates the power of contemporary art to force viewers and scholars into facing their ethical responsibilities as human beings.
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Radical Decadence

8 Claire Bishop, Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship (London and New York: Verso, ... shame, and addictive substances, see Julia Skelly, Wasted Looks: Addiction and British Visual Culture, 1751-1919 ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472569424

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

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This pioneering book explores the notion of 'radical decadence' as concept, aesthetic and lived experience, and as an analytical framework for the study of contemporary feminist textile art. Gendered discourses of decadence that perpetuate anxieties about women's power, consumption and pleasure are deconstructed through images of drug use, female sexuality and 'excessive' living, in artworks by several contemporary textile artists including Orly Cogan, Tracey Emin, Allyson Mitchell, and Rozanne Hawksley. Perceptions of decadence are invariably bound to the negative connotations of decay and degradation, particularly with regard to the transgression of social norms related to femininity and the female body. Excessive consumption by women has historically been represented as grotesque, and until now, women's pleasure in relation to drug and alcohol use has largely gone unexamined in feminist art history and craft studies. Here, representations of female consumption, from cupcakes to alcohol and cocaine, are opened up for critical discussion. Drawing on feminist and queer theories, Julia Skelly considers portrayals of 'bad girls' in artworks that explore female sexuality - performative pieces designed to subvert and exceed feminine roles. In this provocative book, decadence is understood not as a destructive force but as a liberating aesthetic.
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Art for Animals

Visual Culture and Animal Advocacy, 1870–1914 J. Keri Cronin ... In The Victorian Vision: Inventing New Britain, edited by John M. MacKenzie, 215–39. ... Addiction and British Visual Culture, 17511919: Wasted Looks.

Author: J. Keri Cronin

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271081632

Category: History

Page: 264

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Animal rights activists today regularly use visual imagery in their efforts to shape the public’s understanding of what it means to be “kind,” “cruel,” and “inhumane” toward animals. Art for Animals explores the early history of this form of advocacy through the images and the people who harnessed their power. Following in the footsteps of earlier-formed organizations like the RSPCA and ASPCA, animal advocacy groups such as the Victoria Street Society for the Protection of Animals from Vivisection made significant use of visual art in literature and campaign materials. But, enabled by new and improved technologies and techniques, they took the imagery much further than their predecessors did, turning toward vivid, pointed, and at times graphic depictions of human-animal interactions. Keri Cronin explains why the activist community embraced this approach, details how the use of such tools played a critical role in educational and reform movements in the United States, Canada, and England, and traces their impact in public and private spaces. Far from being peripheral illustrations of points articulated in written texts or argued in impassioned speeches, these photographs, prints, paintings, exhibitions, “magic lantern” slides, and films were key components of animal advocacy at the time, both educating the general public and creating a sense of shared identity among the reformers. Uniquely focused on imagery from the early days of the animal rights movement and filled with striking visuals, Art for Animals sheds new light on the history and development of modern animal advocacy.
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The Oxford Handbook of Global Drug History

Opium and the People: Opiate Use and Drug Control Policy in Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century England. Revised ed. ... Addiction and British Visual Culture, 17511919: Wasted Looks. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2014.

Author: Paul Gootenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190842642

Category: History

Page: 720

View: 570

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"This essay reveals how a global "New Drug History" has evolved over the past three decades, along with its latest thematic trends and possible next directions. Scholars have long studied drugs, but only in the 1990s did serious archival and global study of what are now illicit drugs emerge, largely from the influence of the anthropology of drugs on history. A series of key interdisciplinary influences are now in play beyond anthropology, among them, commodity and consumption studies, sociology, medical history, cultural studies, and transnational history. Scholars connect drugs and their changing political or cultural status to larger contexts and epochal events such as wars, empires, capitalism, modernization, or globalizing processes. As the field expands in scope, it may shift deeper into non-western perspectives, a fluid historical definition of drugs; environmental concerns; and research on cannabis and opiates sparked by their current transformations or crises"--
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