Blood Sweat and Tears The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity Into Early Modern Europe

Drawing on the methods of a wide range of academic disciplines, this volume shifts the focus of the history of the body, exploring the many different ways in which its physiology and its fluids were understood in pre-modern European thought ...

Author: Manfred Horstmanshoff

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004229181

Category: History

Page: 772

View: 283

Download →

Drawing on the methods of a wide range of academic disciplines, this volume shifts the focus of the history of the body, exploring the many different ways in which its physiology and its fluids were understood in pre-modern European thought.
Posted in:

Bodily Fluids in Antiquity

... H. King, and C. Zittel (eds) Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, Intersections.

Author: Mark Bradley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429798597

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 193

Download →

From ancient Egypt to Imperial Rome, from Greek medicine to early Christianity, this volume examines how human bodily fluids influenced ideas about gender, sexuality, politics, emotions, and morality, and how those ideas shaped later European thought. Comprising 24 chapters across seven key themes—language, gender, eroticism, nutrition, dissolution, death, and afterlife—this volume investigates bodily fluids in the context of the current sensory turn. It asks fundamental questions about physicality and fluidity: how were bodily fluids categorised and differentiated? How were fluids trapped inside the body perceived, and how did this perception alter when those fluids were externalised? Do ancient approaches complement or challenge our modern sensibilities about bodily fluids? How were religious practices influenced by attitudes towards bodily fluids, and how did religious authorities attempt to regulate or restrict their appearance? Why were some fluids taboo, and others cherished? In what ways were bodily fluids gendered? Offering a range of scholarly approaches and voices, this volume explores how ideas about the body and the fluids it contained and externalised are culturally conditioned and ideologically determined. The analysis encompasses the key geographic centres of the ancient Mediterranean basin, including Greece, Rome, Byzantium, and Egypt. By taking a longue durée perspective across a richly intertwined set of territories, this collection is the first to provide a comprehensive, wide-ranging study of bodily fluids in the ancient world. Bodily Fluids in Antiquity will be of particular interest to academic readers working in the fields of classics and its reception, archaeology, anthropology, and ancient to Early Modern history. It will also appeal to more general readers with an interest in the history of the body and history of medicine.
Posted in:

Inhaling Spirit

In Blood, Sweat, and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, edited by Manfred Horstmanshoff, Helen King, ...

Author: Anya P. Foxen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190082758

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 217

Download →

Recent scholarship has shown that modern postural yoga is the outcome of a complex process of transcultural exchange and syncretism. This book doubles down on those claims and digs even deeper, looking to uncover the disparate but entangled roots of modern yoga practice. Anya Foxen shows that some of what we call yoga, especially in North America and Europe, is genealogically only slightly related to pre-modern Indian yoga traditions. Rather, it is equally, if not more so, grounded in Hellenistic theories of the subtle body, Western esotericism and magic, pre-modern European medicine, and late-nineteenth-century women's wellness programs. The book begins by examining concepts arising out of Greek philosophy and religion, including Pythagoreanism, Stoicism, Neo-Platonism, Galenic medicine, theurgy, and other cultural currents that have traditionally been categorized as "Western esotericism," as well as the more recent examples which scholars of American traditions have labeled "metaphysical religion." Marshaling these under the umbrella category of "harmonialism," Foxen argues that they represent a history of practices that were gradually subsumed into the language of yoga. Orientalism and gender become important categories of analysis as this narrative moves into the nineteenth century. Women considerably outnumber men in all studies of yoga except those conducted in India, and modern anglophone yoga exhibits important continuities with women's physical culture, feminist reform, and white women's engagement with Orientalism. Foxen's study allows us to recontextualize the peculiarities of American yoga--its focus on aesthetic representation, its privileging of bodily posture and unsystematic incorporation of breathwork, and above all its overwhelmingly white female demographic. In this context it addresses the ongoing conversation about cultural appropriation within the yoga community.
Posted in:

Ennius Noster

Blood , Sweat , and Tears : The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe , Leiden , 41-63 .

Author: Jason S. Nethercut

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197517710

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 572

Download →

Consensus holds that Lucretius admired the literary prestige of Homeric epos, the form that Ennius famously introduced to Latin literature. However, some hold that Lucretius disagreed with Ennius' quasi-Pythagorean claim to be Homer reborn, and so uniquely qualified to adapt Homeric poetry to the Latin language. Likewise, received wisdom holds that Lucretius followed in the path of poets writing in the wake of Ennius' Annales, most of whom employed an Ennian style. However, throughout the De Rerum Natura, Lucretius' use of Ennius' Annales as a formal model for a long discursive poem in epic meter was neither inevitable nor predictable, on the one hand, nor meaningful in the simple way that critical consensus has always maintained. Jason Nethercut posits that Lucretius selected Ennius as a model precisely to dismantle the values for which he claimed Ennius stood, including the importance of history as a poetic subject and Rome's historical achievement in particular. As the first book to offer substantial analysis of the relationship between two of the ancient world's most impactful poets, Ennius Noster: Lucretius and the Annales fills an important gap not only in Lucretian scholarship, but also in our understanding of Latin literary history.
Posted in:

Signing the Body

Reframing Conceptions of the Skin in Medicine, 1572– 1714,” in Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern ...

Author: Katherine Dauge-Roth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429880414

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 318

View: 416

Download →

The first major scholarly investigation into the rich history of the marked body in the early modern period, this interdisciplinary study examines multiple forms, uses, and meanings of corporeal inscription and impression in France and the French Atlantic from the late sixteenth through early eighteenth centuries. Placing into dialogue a broad range of textual and visual sources drawn from areas as diverse as demonology, jurisprudence, mysticism, medicine, pilgrimage, commerce, travel, and colonial conquest that have formerly been examined largely in isolation, Katherine Dauge-Roth demonstrates that emerging theories and practices of signing the body must be understood in relationship to each other and to the development of other material marking practices that rose to prominence in the early modern period. While each chapter brings to light the particular histories and meanings of a distinct set of cutaneous marks—devil’s marks on witches, demon’s marks upon the possessed, devotional wounds, Amerindian and Holy Land pilgrim tattoos, and criminal brands—each also reveals connections between these various types of stigmata, links that were obvious to the early modern thinkers who theorized and deployed them. Moreover, the five chapters bring to the fore ways in which corporeal marking of all kinds interacted dynamically with practices of writing on, imprinting, and engraving paper, parchment, fabric, and metal that flourished in the period, together signaling important changes taking place in early modern society. Examining the marked body as a material object rife with varied meanings and uses, Signing the Body: Marks on Skin in Early Modern France shows how the skin itself became the register of the profound cultural and social transformations that characterized this era.
Posted in:

Money in the German speaking Lands

... Joseph Duchesne and Francis Bacon,” in Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, ed.

Author: Mary Lindemann

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781785335891

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 328

View: 611

Download →

Money is more than just a medium of financial exchange: across time and place, it has performed all sorts of cultural, political, and social functions. This volume traces money in German-speaking Europe from the late Renaissance until the close of the twentieth century, exploring how people have used it and endowed it with multiple meanings. The fascinating studies gathered here collectively demonstrate money’s vast symbolic and practical significance, from its place in debates about religion and the natural world to its central role in statecraft and the formation of national identity.
Posted in:

Peter Paul Rubens and the Counter Reformation Crisis of the Beati moderni

... and Medicine and their Interconnections,” in, Blood, Sweat and Tears. The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe,ed.

Author: Ruth S. Noyes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351613200

Category: Art

Page: 348

View: 652

Download →

Peter Paul Rubens and the Crisis of the Beati Moderni takes up the question of the issues involved in the formation of recent saints - or Beati moderni (modern Blesseds) as they were called - by the Jesuits and Oratorians in the new environment of increased strictures and censorship that developed after the Council of Trent with respect to legal canonization procedures and cultic devotion to the saints. Ruth Noyes focuses particularly on how the new regulations pertained to the creation of emerging cults of those not yet canonized, the so-called Beati moderni, such as Jesuit founders Francis Xavier and Ignatius Loyola, and Filippo Neri, founder of the Oratorians. Centrally involved in the book is the question of the fate and meaning of the two altarpiece paintings commissioned by the Oratorians from Peter Paul Rubens. The Congregation rejected his first altarpiece because it too specifically identified Filippo Neri as a cult figure to be venerated (before his actual canonization) and thus was caught up in the politics of cult formation and the papacy’s desire to control such pre-canonization cults. The book demonstrates that Rubens' second altarpiece, although less overtly depicting Neri as a saint, was if anything more radical in the claims it made for him. Peter Paul Rubens and the Crisis of the Beati Moderni offers the first comparative study of Jesuit and Oratorian images of their respective would-be saints, and the controversy they ignited across Church hierarchies. It is also the first work to examine provocative Philippine imagery and demonstrate how its bold promotion specifically triggered the first wave of curial censure in 1602.
Posted in:

Gateways to the Book

... (with Helen King and Manfred Horstmannshoff) Blood, Sweat and tears. The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, ...

Author: Gitta Bertram

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004464520

Category: Art

Page: 636

View: 173

Download →

An investigation of the complex image-text relationships between frontispieces and illustrated title pages with the following texts in European books published between 1500 and 1800.
Posted in:

Science and Religion in Mamluk Egypt

1684169; Helen King, “Introduction,” in Blood, Sweat and Tears.' The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe (Intersections: ...

Author: Nahyan Fancy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136703614

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 877

Download →

The discovery of the pulmonary transit of blood was a ground-breaking discovery in the history of the life sciences, and a prerequisite for William Harvey’s fully developed theory of blood circulation three centuries later. This book is the first attempt at understanding Ibn al-Nafīs’s anatomical discovery from within the medical and theological works of this thirteenth century physician-jurist, and his broader social, religious and intellectual contexts. Although Ibn al-Nafīs did not posit a theory of blood circulation, he nevertheless challenged the reigning Galenic and Avicennian physiological theories, and the then prevailing anatomical understandings of the heart. Far from being a happy guess, Ibn al-Nafīs’s anatomical result is rooted in an extensive re-evaluation of the reigning medical theories. Moreover, this book shows that Ibn al-Nafīs’s re-evaluation is itself a result of his engagement with post-Avicennian debates on the relationship between reason and revelation, and the rationality of traditionalist beliefs, such as bodily resurrection. Breaking new ground by showing how medicine, philosophy and theology were intertwined in the intellectual fabric of pre-modern Islamic societies, Science and Religion in Mamluk Egypt will be of interest to students and scholars of the History of Science, the History of Medicine and Islamic Studies.
Posted in:

Votive Body Parts in Greek and Roman Religion

Horstmanshoff, M., King, H. and Zittel, C. (2012) (eds) Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe.

Author: Jessica Hughes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108146166

Category: History

Page:

View: 129

Download →

This book examines a type of object that was widespread and very popular in classical antiquity - votive offerings in the shape of parts of the human body. It collects examples from four principal areas and time periods: Classical Greece, pre-Roman Italy, Roman Gaul and Roman Asia Minor. It uses a compare-and-contrast methodology to highlight differences between these sets of votives, exploring the implications for our understandings of how beliefs about the body changed across classical antiquity. The book also looks at how far these ancient beliefs overlap with, or differ from, modern ideas about the body and its physical and conceptual boundaries. Central themes of the book include illness and healing, bodily fragmentation, human-animal hybridity, transmission and reception of traditions, and the mechanics of personal transformation in religious rituals.
Posted in:

The Making of Copernicus

Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe (Leiden: 2012) 217–240. 38 As Hume puts it, ...

Author: Wolfgang Neuber

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004281127

Category: SCIENCE

Page: 348

View: 752

Download →

The volume articles examine exemplarily how some of the Copernicus myths came about and if they could hold their ground. They investigate methodological, institutional, textual and visual transformations of the Copernican doctrine and the topical, rhetorical and literary transformations of the historical person of Copernicus respectively.
Posted in:

Innovation in Byzantine Medicine

Blood , Sweat and Tears - The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe . Leiden : Brill , 629-59 . Romano , R. 1979/80 .

Author: Petros Bouras-Vallianatos

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198850687

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 719

Download →

Byzantine medicine remains a little known and misrepresented field not only in the context of debates on medieval medicine, but also among Byzantinists themselves. It is often viewed as 'stagnant' and mainly preserving ancient ideas, and our knowledge of it continues to be based to a great extent on the comments of earlier authorities, which are often repeated uncritically. This volume presents the first comprehensive examination of the medical corpus of, arguably, the most important Late Byzantine physician: John Zacharias Aktouarios (c.1275-c.1330). Its main thesis is that John's medical works show an astonishing degree of openness to knowledge from outside Byzantium combined with a significant degree of originality, in particular, in the fields of uroscopy and human physiology. The analysis of John's edited (On Urines and On Psychic Pneuma) and unedited (Medical Epitome) treatises is supported for the first time by the consultation of a large number of manuscripts, and is also informed by evidence from a wide range of medical sources, including those previously unpublished, and texts from other genres, such as epistolography and merchants' accounts. The contextualization of John's corpus sheds new light on the development of Byzantine medical thought and practice, and enhances our understanding of the Late Byzantine social and intellectual landscape. Through examination of his medical observations in the light of examples from the medieval Latin and Islamic worlds, his theories are also placed within the wider Mediterranean milieu, highlighting the cultural exchange between Byzantium and its neighbours.
Posted in:

Contagionism Catches On

... in Blood, Sweat and Tears—The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, ed. Manfred Horstmanshoff, Helen King and Claus ...

Author: Margaret DeLacy

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319509594

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 232

Download →

This book shows how contagionism evolved in eighteenth century Britain and describes the consequences of this evolution. By the late eighteenth century, the British medical profession was divided between traditionalists, who attributed acute diseases to the interaction of internal imbalances with external factors such as weather, and reformers, who blamed contagious pathogens. The reformers, who were often “outsiders,” English Nonconformists or men born outside England, emerged from three coincidental transformations: transformation in medical ideas, in the nature and content of medical education, and in the sort of men who became physicians. Adopting contagionism led them to see acute diseases as separate entities, spurring a process that reoriented medical research, changed communities, established new medical institutions, and continues to the present day.
Posted in:

Sophistic Views of the Epic Past from the Classical to the Imperial Age

... King , H. and Zittel , C. (eds), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, Leiden : 551–67 .

Author:

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350255784

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 849

Download →

This collection of essays sheds new light on the relationship between two of the main drivers of intellectual discourse in ancient Greece: the epic tradition and the Sophists. The contributors show how throughout antiquity the epic tradition proved a flexible instrument to navigate new political, cultural, and philosophical contexts. The Sophists, both in the Classical and the Imperial age, continuously reconfigured the value of epic poetry according to the circumstances: using epic myths allowed the Sophists to present themselves as the heirs of traditional education, but at the same time this tradition was reshaped to encapsulate new questions that were central to the Sophists' intellectual agenda. This volume is structured chronologically, encompassing the ancient world from the Classical Age through the first two centuries AD. The first chapters, on the First Sophistic, discuss pivotal works such as Gorgias' Encomium of Helen and Apology of Palamedes, Alcidamas' Odysseus or Against the Treachery of Palamedes, and Antisthenes' pair of speeches Ajax and Odysseus, as well as a range of passages from Plato and other authors. The volume then moves on to discuss some of the major works of literature from the Second Sophistic dealing with the epic tradition. These include Lucian's Judgement of the Goddesses and Dio Chrysostom's orations 11 and 20, as well as Philostratus' Heroicus and Imagines.
Posted in:

Homer s Iliad

In Blood, Sweat and Tears – The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe, ed. by M. Horstmanshoff George 2005 Germain 1954 ...

Author: Claude Brügger

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110557190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 405

Download →

The renowned Basler Homer-Kommentar of the Iliad, edited by Anton Bierl and Joachim Latacz and originally published in German, presents the latest developments in Homeric scholarship. Through the English translation of this ground-breaking reference work, edited by S. Douglas Olson, its valuable findings are now made accessible to students and scholars worldwide.
Posted in:

Misery to Mirth

Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe (Leiden, 2012). * Roy Porter, The Patient's View: Doing ...

Author: Hannah Newton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198779025

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 999

Download →

Misery to Mirth aims to change our thinking about health in early modern England. Drawing on sources such as diaries and medical texts, it shows that recovery did exist as a concept, and that it was a widely-reported event. The study examines how patients, and their loved ones, dealt with overcoming a seemingly fatal illness.--
Posted in:

Killing Times

... Ibn AlNafis, Servetus, Itaki, Attar,” in Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity to Early Modern Europe, ed.

Author: David Wills

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823283514

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 312

Download →

Killing Times begins with the deceptively simple observation—made by Jacques Derrida in his seminars on the topic—that the death penalty mechanically interrupts mortal time by preempting the typical mortal experience of not knowing at what precise moment we will die. Through a broader examination of what constitutes mortal temporality, David Wills proposes that the so-called machinery of death summoned by the death penalty works by exploiting, or perverting, the machinery of time that is already attached to human existence. Time, Wills argues, functions for us in general as a prosthetic technology, but the application of the death penalty represents a new level of prosthetic intervention into what constitutes the human. Killing Times traces the logic of the death penalty across a range of sites. Starting with the legal cases whereby American courts have struggled to articulate what methods of execution constitute “cruel and unusual punishment,” Wills goes on to show the ways that technologies of death have themselves evolved in conjunction with ideas of cruelty and instantaneity, from the development of the guillotine and the trap door for hanging, through the firing squad and the electric chair, through today’s controversies surrounding lethal injection. Responding to the legal system’s repeated recourse to storytelling—prosecutors’ and politicians’ endless recounting of the horrors of crimes—Wills gives a careful eye to the narrative, even fictive spaces that surround crime and punishment. Many of the controversies surrounding capital punishment, Wills argues, revolve around the complex temporality of the death penalty: how its instant works in conjunction with forms of suspension, or extension of time; how its seeming correlation between egregious crime and painless execution is complicated by a number of different discourses. By pinpointing the temporal technology that marks the death penalty, Wills is able to show capital punishment’s expansive reach, tracing the ways it has come to govern not only executions within the judicial system, but also the opposed but linked categories of the suicide bombing and drone warfare. In discussing the temporal technology of death, Wills elaborates the workings both of the terrorist who produces a simultaneity of crime and “punishment” that bypasses judicial process, and of the security state, in whose remote-control killings the time-space coordinates of “justice” are compressed and at the same time disappear into the black hole of secrecy. Grounded in a deep ethical and political commitment to death penalty abolition, Wills’s engaging and powerfully argued book pushes the question of capital punishment beyond the confines of legal argument to show how the technology of capital punishment defines and appropriates the instant of death and reconfigures the whole of human mortality.
Posted in:

The Woman with the Blood Flow Mark 5 24 34

... 9.19-22 ) in early medieval visual culture ' , in Blood , Sweat and Tears . The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe ...

Author: Barbara Baert

Publisher: Peeters Pub & Booksellers

ISBN: UCR:31210023837121

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 206

Download →

This publication starts from a particular passage in the New Testament that tells the story of a "woman with an issue of blood." The gospel relates how the so-called Haemorrhoissa is healed the very moment she touches Christ's garment. This publication forms the first - and so far the only - interdisciplinary study of this particular biblical motif from an exegetical, art-historical and anthropological point of view. Contributing scholars interpret the impact of this biblical miracle on Christian texts, material culture and healing archetypes in the Middle Ages and Early Modernity. The story and its Nachleben in literary commentaries and various iconographies unveil a particular energy in Christendom related to ideas about the female body, the role of textile, and the magical impact of touch. This volumes contributes to all research in the humanities concerned with gender, the sensorium, Judeo-Christian attitudes towards blood and taboo, and early Christian material culture in the East and West. Its trajectory ultimately reveals the crucial mystery at the heart of image-making as such.
Posted in:

Natur Geschlecht Politik

Die Naturalisierung der Geschlechterordnung hat eine eminent politische Bedeutung.

Author: Andreas Höfele

Publisher: Brill Fink

ISBN: 3770565339

Category: Gender identity

Page: 329

View: 559

Download →

Die Naturalisierung der Geschlechterordnung hat eine eminent politische Bedeutung. Dies lässt sich an der Geschichte der Geschlechter in vormodernen Gesellschaften beobachten, gewinnt aber auch in unseren Tagen erneut unerwartete Aktualität.0Die vermeintliche ?Natur?-Ordnung der Geschlechter, die teils explizit behauptet, teils aber auch begründungslos vorausgesetzt wird, demonstriert die Wirkungsmacht von Naturalisierung in besonderem Maße. Gerade hier wird die Umwandlung gesellschaftlich-kulturell bedingter und historisch variabler Verhältnisse in vermeintlich ahistorische und invariable Naturgegebenheit und Naturnotwendigkeit exemplarisch deutlich. Der Band zeigt Strategien und Modelle der Naturalisierung der Geschlechterordnung sowie die Breite und Varianz der Geschlechterrollen vom Alten Testament und der klassischen Antike über naturphilosophische Spekulationen im Mittelalter bis in die Literaturen und die Kunst der Neuzeit.
Posted in: