Boom Ravine

This is the dramatic story of the events on the Somme after the great battle of 1916 ended and before the Germans withdrew to the Hindenburg Line. Its focus is on a ravine easily as impressive as that at Beaumont Hamel.

Author: Trevor Pidgeon

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473812628

Category: History

Page: 144

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The principal action that took place here in February 1917 was of short duration and failure but with fascinating overtones. This is the dramatic story of the events on the Somme after the great battle of 1916 ended and before the Germans withdrew to the Hindenburg Line. Its focus is on a ravine easily as impressive as that at Beaumont Hamel.
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The Die Hards in the Great War Vol 2

1917 South Miraumont Trench 9 Whilst the assaulting troops were pushing on to the spur south 12th of Petit Miraumont and the second objective, the dug-out" clearing Companies of the 12th Middlesex were at work in Boom £, Ravine.

Author: Everard Wyrall

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781781508336

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 188

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The 'Die-Hards' is the nickname of the Middlesex Regiment, earned at the battle of Albuera in the Peninsular War in May 1811. The Regiment was one of five that had four regular battalions before the outbreak of war, it also had two Special Reserve battalions (5th and 6th) and four Territorial battalions, 7th to 10th. During the course of the war another thirty-nine battalions were formed making the Regiment the second largest along with the King's (Liverpool), though not all battalions survived to the end of the war; twenty-four of them went abroad, serving on the Western Front, Gallipoli, Italy, Macedonia, Mesopotamia, India, Egypt, Palestine, Gibraltar and Siberia. Losses amounted to 12,720, 81 Battle Honours and 5 VCs were awarded. The Middlesex were in it right from the start, the first soldier of the BEF to be killed was L/Cpl Parr, 4th Middlesex, on 21 August 1914, and the first officer to be killed was from the same battalion - Major W.H Abell, at Mons on 23 August. This is not a history that deals with each battalion independently, there are too many of them. The narrative describes the fortunes of the twenty-four active service battalions (with very good maps) in the various theatres of war, though mainly on the Western Front, and on every page there is, in the margin the date of the action or event being described and the battalion or battalions involved. The first volume covers 1914 to the end of 1916, and the second takes up the story from the beginning of 1917 to the armistice, including a chapter on operations in Siberia and Murmansk involving the 25th Battalion which didn't get home till September 1919. Speaking of his battalion [25th] the CO said: "One and all behaved like Englishmen - the highest eulogy that can be passed upon the conduct of men." Sentiments like that expressed today would almost get you clapped in irons! There is no Roll of Honour nor list of Honours and Awards. There is a very useful appendix listing all the active service battalions with the brigades and divisions to which they were allocated with any subsequent changes, and the theatres in which they served.
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The 18th Division in the Great War

Fought about midway between those points, the Battle of Boom Ravine broke the backbone of the German resistance on the Ancre, and accelerated this satisfactory harvest gathered in very unseasonable conditions.

Author: Captain G. H. F. Nichols

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781781515150

Category: History

Page: 516

View: 609

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The 18th (Eastern) Division was formed in mid-September 1914, part of Kitchener’s Second New Army. It was lucky in its first GOC, Ivor Maxse, who had been brought home from commanding the 1st (Guards) Brigade, an officer well known for his ability in training skills and for demanding the highest standards. He was to be their GOC until January 1917, when he was replaced by another highly capable commander, Richard Philip Lee, who remained in command for the rest of the war. With the advantage of having only two GOCs, both of such a calibre, the 18th Division reached a very high peak of efficiency and became one of the best in the BEF. It was awarded eleven VCs, the second highest number awarded to a non-regular division, after the twelve won by the 55th (W Lanc) Division, and gained over 4,300 other awards; total casualties amounted to 46,503. This is a well written history, one of the better works of its kind. It reads more like an adventure story than the somewhat stiff and formal style we find with some divisional histories. Cyril Falls rates it highly. The author was a journalist and this is reflected in his style of writing. He served in the division as an artillery officer in the 82nd Brigade RFA and his account takes in events great and small, the major battles and day to day happenings. He makes good use of official documents such as location states, operational orders, order of battle and citations as well as personal anecdotes and experiences. There is the curious statement that during a period of rest during Third Ypres the division was visited by the corps commander, Hunter Weston. In fact Maxse was the commander, their old divisional commander; the 18th Division never served in a corps commanded by ‘Hunter Bunter’. His account of the Battle of Boom Ravine (February 1917), suggests a clear cut victory, certainly not the case. He makes reference to the fact that Gough (Fifth Army Commander) ordered an enquiry immediately after the battle to ascertain why the attack on 17th February failed to achieve the objectives. He does describe an act of treachery in which two men from a neighbouring division went over to the enemy and revealed the time of the attack. This, too, was the subject of an enquiry ordered by Gough. This is an enjoyable read.
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The Norfolk Regiment on the Western Front 1914 1918

After a period of time out of the line, the 8th Battalion went into trenches facing a German position known as Boom Ravine. Here they would take part in an attack to capture this position. The attack was due to go in on 17 February 1917 ...

Author: Steve Smith

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 267

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Steve Smith tells the story of the five Battalions of the Norfolk Regiment who served on the Western Front using previously unseen photographs, diaries, accounts, and letters. He has also had full access to the Norfolk Regiment Museum archives. It is the men who served in the Norfolks who will tell this story. This book will interest readers nationally & locally as it not only studies the Regiment’s participation in well-known battles such as Ypres and the Somme, but also takes a fresh look at the lesser-known battles fought, battles such as Elouges in 1914 and Kaiserschlacht in 1918. Steve has considered the German perspective too, looking at the men who faced them at places such as Falfemont Farm in 1916. Using new evidence from the Regiment’s participation in the Christmas Truce, he separates the truth from myth surrounding the stories of football played at this time, a controversy that still rages. Steve has walked the ground over which they fought and fresh maps complement this research so the book serves as a history book for those at home and a guidebook for those who wish to get out and explore, down to trench level, the ground covered in its pages.
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From Bapaume to Passchendaele

the way to Miraumont there was a deep gully called Boom Ravine, and here on February 17 there was fierce fighting by the Royal Fusiliers, the Northamptons, and the Middlesex men of the 29th Division. In difficulty, in grim human courage ...

Author: Philip Gibbs

Publisher: Prabhat Prakashan

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 384

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1917.... I suppose that a century hence men and women will think of that date as one of the world's black years flinging its shadow forward to the future until gradually new generations escape from its dark spell. To us now, only a few months away from that year, above all to those of us who have seen something of the fighting which crowded every month of it except the last, the colour of 1917 is not black but red, because a river of blood flowed through its changing seasons and there was a great carnage of men. It was a year of unending battle on the Western Front, which matters most to us because of all our youth there. It was a year of monstrous and desperate conflict. Looking back upon it, remembering all its days of attack and counter-attack, all the roads of war crowded with troops and transport, all the battlefields upon which our armies moved under fire, the coming back of the prisoners by hundreds and thousands, the long trails of the wounded, the activity, the traffic, the roar and welter and fury of the year, one has a curious physical sensation of breathlessness and heart-beat because of the burden of so many memories. The heroism of men, the suffering of individuals, their personal adventures, their deaths or escape from death, are swallowed up in this wild drama of battle so that at times it seems impersonal and inhuman like some cosmic struggle in which man is but an atom of the world's convulsion. To me, and perhaps to others like me, who look on at all this from the outside edge of it, going into its fire and fury at times only to look again, closer, into the heart of it, staring at its scenes not as men who belong to them but as witnesses to give evidence at the bar of history—for if we are not that we are nothing—and to chronicle the things that have happened on those fields, this sense of impersonal forces is strong. We see all this in the mass. We see its movement as a tide watched from the bank and not from the point of view of a swimmer breasting each wave or going down in it. Regimental officers and men know more of the ground in which they live for a while before they go forward over the shell-craters to some barren slope where machine-guns are hidden below the clods of soil, or a line of concrete blockhouses heaped up with timber and sand-bags on one of the ridges.
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Britain s Last Tommies

Lieutenant Richard Hawkins took part in one, the Battle for Boom Ravine.] Lieutenant Richard Hawkins, 11th Royal Fusiliers, 1895-1994 Our forming-up place was just in front of a depression known as the Gully and our target was Boom ...

Author: Richard van Emden

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781848845633

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 710

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In the later 2nd century BC, after a period of rapid expansion and conquest, the Roman Republic found itself in crisis. In North Africa her armies were already bogged down in a long difficult guerrilla war in a harsh environment when invasion by a coalition of Germanic tribes, the Cimbri, Teutones and Ambrones, threatened Italy and Rome itself, inflicting painful defeats on Roman forces in pitched battle Gaius Marius was the man of the hour. The first war he brought to an end through tactical brilliance, bringing the Numidian King Jugurtha back in chains. Before his ship even returned to Italy, the senate elected Marius to lead the war against the northern invaders. Reorganizing and reinvigorating the demoralized Roman legions, he led them to two remarkable victories in the space of months, crushing the Teutones and Ambrones at Aquiae Sextae and the Cimbri at Vercellae. The Roman army emerged from this period of crisis a much leaner and more professional force and the author examines the extent to which the 'Marian Reforms' were responsible for this and the extent to which they can be attributed to Marius himself.
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The Kensington Battalion

Some of the latter when faced with the natural barrier of the Boom Ravine, and badly cut wire, had side-slipped to their right over West Miraumont Road to get around it, before going left back on track. (Others may have still carried on ...

Author: G. I. S. Inglis

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783461080

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 341

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Raised by the Mayor of Kensington, the 22nd Royal Fusiliers (the Kensington Battalion) were a strange mixture of social classes (bankers and stevedores, writers and laborers) with a strong sprinkling of irreverent colonials thrown in. Such a disparate group needed a strong leader and, luckily, in Randle Barratt Barker, they found one, first as their trainer and then as the Commanding Officer.As this superb book reveals The Kensington Battalion had a unique spirit and given their ordeals they needed this. They suffered severely in the battles of 1917 and, starved of reinforcements, were disbanded in 1918. Yet thanks to a strong Old Comrades Association, a special magazine Mufti, welfare work and reunions the Battalions close spirit lived on.The author has successfully drawn on a wealth of first hand material (diaries, letters and official documents) as well as interviews from the 1980s to produce a fitting and atmospheric record of service and sacrifice.
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Rats Alley

Ravine [S of Beaumont Hamel] Ravine [south of Boom Ravine] Ravine Alley Ravine Avenue Ravine Avenue / Boyau du Ravin Ravine Copse Ravine Copse [Redoubt] Ravine Road [road] Ravine Shelters / Abris du Ravin Ravine Track Ravine Wood Ravine ...

Author: Peter Chasseaud

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780750984904

Category: History

Page: 768

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When first published in 2006, Rats Alley was a ground-breaking piece of research, the first-ever study of trench names of the Western Front. Now, in this fully updated and revised second edition, the gazetteer has been extended to well over 20,000 trench names, complete with map references – in itself an essential tool for any First World War researcher. However, combined with the finely considered history and analysis of trench naming during the First World War, this is an edition that no military history enthusiast should be without. Discover when, how and why British trenches were first named and follow the names’ fascinating development throughout the First World War, alongside details of French and German trench-naming practices. Looked at from both contemporary and modern points of view, the names reveal the full horror of trench warfare and throw an extraordinary sidelight on the cultural life of the period, and the landscape and battles of the Western Front. Names such as Lovers Lane, Idiot Corner, Cyanide Trench, Crazy Redoubt, Doleful Post, Furies Trench, Peril Avenue, Lunatic Sap and Gangrene Alley can be placed in context. With useful information on where original trench maps are held, and how to obtain copies, Rats Alley is a vital volume for both military and family historians.
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The Royal fusiliers in the great war

Boom Ravine.—The three divisions engaged all contained battalions of Royal Fusiliers; but the 7th Battalion, in the 63rd Division, was not called upon. On the right of the 63rd Division, ...

Author: H.C. O'Neill

Publisher: Dalcassian Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page: 436

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The 54th Infantry Brigade 1914 1918

then across the deep sunken road known as Boom Ravine, which, so far as this Brigade is concerned, gives its name to the action. The assaulting battalions were the Northamptonshires (right) and Fusiliers (left).

Author: 54th Infantry

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781781513736

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 397

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This book has a subtitle: 'Some Records of Battle and Laughter in France' which sets the tone of this history, the history of one of the most remarkable brigades that fought on the Western Front, part of one of the most remarkable divisions. The 18th (Eastern) Division became an elite formation, one of Kitchener’s Second New Army divisions, which had the advantage of being commanded by Ivor Maxse, foremost among commanders for his training and leadership qualities. He commanded it for two and a quarter years and his successor, R.P Lee, another good commander, lead it for the rest of the war. Only two GOCs in four years of war. The 54th Brigade was to win eight VCs, the highest number for a non-regular army brigade, eight out of the eleven awarded to the division. The history is made up of the stories and recollections of all ranks, and the style is very informal. The compiler or editor has chosen to remain anonymous, but the result is something like a regimental history, with a good sprinkling of personalities identified in the narrative. Much is made of the ‘Spirit of the Brigade, a morale booster undoubtedly helped by the fact the battalions stayed together from the time they arrived in France in July 1915 till the reorganization of the BEF in February 1918 when brigades were reduced to three battalions. The 54th Brigade certainly saw a great deal of action and there are plenty of lively descriptions. The Brigade commander tells of his visit to an emplacement known as Panama House during a lively ‘strafe’. The company sergeant-major emerged, grabbed the brigadier and threw him inside saying: 'We don’t want no dead Brigadiers round our pillbox.' The brigade commanders and staff and the unit commanders are listed in the appendix and the eight VC citations are given.
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Courcelette

Beyond it in the German lines was a deep ravine, Boom Ravine, an ancient quarry in which several battalions of infantry could shelter out of view from Courcelette. Branches of Boom Ravine ran towards Regina Trench, facilitating easy and ...

Author: Paul Reed

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473813380

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 779

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Courcelette is one of the many Somme villages that became a German stronghold in their tenacious fight to keep the British armies at bay. Well behind the lines on 1 July, it came into prominence on 15 September when it fell to an attack by the Canadians.
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The History of A Battery 84th Army Brigade R F A

For the next three weeks the 18th Division was very busy trying to hurry the Germans in going back. During this period barrages were fired for attacks on Grandcourt Trench, Coffee Trench, Boom Ravine, and South Miraumont Trench.

Author: D. F. Grant

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781781491478

Category: History

Page: 94

View: 538

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The battery whose story is briefly chronicled in this book, was fortunate in one respect, possibly even unique. From its formation in October 1914 till demobilised in 1919 it had only one commander, the author of this book, Major Grant, who, as a young subaltern, was given command of a hundred Kitchener volunteers and told to make a battery of them. So the 262nd Battery RFA came into being; three months later it became ‘A’ Battery of the 84th Brigade, RFA. Another piece of good fortune was the division to which it was allocated – the 18th (Eastern) Division, then being formed as part of Kitchener’s Second New Army. Its GOC was Ivor Maxse, a Coldstreamer, an officer well known for his ability in training skills, and under his command the 18th Division was to become one of the best in the BEF. They went to France in July 1915 and moved into the Fricourt-Carnoy sector. During the next nineteen months the battery fought in all the battles of the 18th Division, right through the Somme offensive in which the division was engaged in nine battles and actions. At the beginning of 1917 a new type of artillery unit was created, the Army Brigade R.F.A. Most of these were formed by withdrawing an artillery brigade from each division and the 84th Brigade was selected from the 18th Division, assuming its new role on 22 Feb 1917. These brigades were available for attachment to any division, corps or army needing reinforcement in artillery, and by the end of the war the 84th Army Brigade RFA had served with twenty two different divisions, taking part in the Battles of Vimy Ridge, Messines, Flanders 1917, the March 1918 retreat and the counter-offensive of August. In all no less than 35 officers and 600 other ranks passed through this single battery of six guns during its four and a half years’ existence. At the end of the book is a list of the officers giving the period during which they were with the battery and the reason for leaving. There is also a list of awards but no roll of honour.
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Facing Armageddon

The largely forgotten battle which led to its capture of Boom Ravine and cost it nearly 1,200 casualties on 17 February 1917, helped to break the back of German resistance on the Ancre and seems to have precipitated the planned German ...

Author: Hugh Cecil

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9780850525250

Category: History

Page: 960

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Facing Armageddon is the first scholarly work on the 1914-18 War to explore, on a world-wide basis, the real nature of the participants experience. Sixty-four scholars from all over the globe deliver the fruits of recent research in what civilians and servicemen passed through, in the air, on the sea and on land.
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Somme 1916

He visited Boom Ravine, into which REGINA TRENCH leads between Miraumont and Pys and described it as a 'shambles of German troops'. The Germans had had machinegun emplacements there and also deep dugouts under cover of earth banks, ...

Author: Gerald Gliddon

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780752495354

Category: History

Page: 560

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Gerald Gliddon's classic survery of the Somme battlefield in 1916, first published in 1987 to great acclaim, has been greatly expanded and updated to include the latest research and analysis. Supported by a wide selection of archive photographs and drawing on the testimony of those who took part, this new edition covers both the famous battle sites, such as High Wood and Mametz Wood and lesser known villages on the outlying flanks. It includes a day-by-day account of the British build-up on the Somme and the ensuing struggle, British and German orders of battle and a full history of the cemeteries and memorials, both 'lost' and current, that sprang up in the years following the First World War. The author also provides thumbnail biographies of all the senior officers to fall, as well as the winners of the Victoria Cross and those who were 'shot at dawn'. In addition, Somme 'personalities' such as George Butterworth are covered in far greater detail than before.
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A Brigadier In France 1917 1918

The 17th Division was to attack the heights while the 21st Division moved along the valley with the object of capturing the high ground East of Boom Ravine and South of Miraumont. The 64th Brigade was detailed to carry out the first ...

Author: Brigadier Hanway Robert Cumming

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781782891802

Category: History

Page: 110

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“Great War memoirs of an officer who served on the Western front as a battalion commander (2 DLI) then as commander 91st Brigade, 7th Division. He was dismissed during the Battle of Bullecourt in May 1917 but came back in May 1918 as commander 110th Brigade. Murdered in Ireland in March 1921 while commanding the Kerry Brigade Hanway Robert Cumming was commissioned into the Durham Light Infantry (DLI) in 1889 and saw active service during the South African War. He was in a staff appointment in India in August 1914 and did not arrive in France till June 1915 where he again held staff appointments until August 1916 when he took command of 2nd DLI. In November 1916 he was appointed to command of the 91st Brigade, 7th Division, a post he held till May 1917 when, during the Battle of Bullecourt he was summarily dismissed by the divisional commander (Shoubridge) and went home on leave, under protest as he describes in the book (less than a month later he was awarded the DSO in the 1917 Birthday Honours!). From August 1917 to the following February he commanded the MG Corps Training Centre at Grantham and then, in March 1918 he went back to France to command the 110th Brigade, 21st Division where he stayed to the end of the war. After the war, while commanding the Kerry Brigade in Ireland he was murdered, on 6th March 1921...The greater part of the book deals with his command of the 110th Brigade which he took over less than a week before the German Spring offensive, which is dealt with in detail, as is the May offensive in Champagne in which 21st Division was one of the five British divisions fighting under French command, and then the final allied counter-offensive. In all this is an interesting picture of the life of a brigade commander on the Western front. He tells his story in the third person, referring to himself throughout as the brigadier.”—N&M Press Ed.
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From the Somme to Victory

The Durhams, who had been attacked on the right while crossing Boom Ravine, came up 45 minutes later and established a short defensive flank to the right of the 9th KOYLI. The 1st East Yorkshires were similarly held up and did not ...

Author: Peter Simkins

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781781593127

Category: History

Page: 256

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Peter Simkins has established a reputation over the last forty years as one of the most original and stimulating historians of the First World War. He has made a major contribution to the debate about the performance of the British Army on the Western Front. This collection of his most perceptive and challenging essays, which concentrates on British operations in France between 1916 and 1918, shows that this reputation is richly deserved. He focuses on key aspects of the army's performance in battle, from the first day of the Somme to the Hundred Days, and gives a fascinating insight into the developing theory and practice of the army as it struggled to find a way to break through the German line. His rigorous analysis undermines some of the common assumptions - and the myths - that still cling to the history of these British battles.
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The German Army on the Somme 1914 1916

about 650 metres south of and parallel to Baum Mulde [Boom Ravine]. This trench was named Dessauer Riegel/Leipziger Riegel [Dessau/Leipzig Stop Line = Desire Support]. A further one hundred metres to the north and parallel to Dessauer ...

Author: Jack Sheldon

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781848847088

Category: History

Page: 352

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Petilius Cerealis is one of the few Imperial Roman officers, below the level of Emperor, whose career it is possible to follow in sufficient detail to write a coherent biography. Fortunately his career was a remarkably eventful and colorful one. With a knack for being caught up in big events and emerging unscathed despite some hairy adventures (and scandal, usually involving some local wench) he appears to have been a Roman version of Blackadder and Flashman combined. Cerealis was in Britain when Boudicca's revolt erupted (60 or 61 AD) and marched to confront her. He lost most of his force but narrowly escaped with his own skin intact. In 69 AD, the infamously tumultuous 'year of the four emperors', he was in Rome, the seat of conspiracy. When his uncle, none other than Vespasian, decided to make his own bid for the imperial purple (he was to become the fourth emperor that year), Cerealis was in danger of losing his life as a traitor and had to escape from the city to join his uncle who was marching to force his way in. A short while later he was commanding a force on the Rhine when the Batavian mutiny broke out. This time he only escaped death because he was in bed with a local girl rather than in his own tent. And so it goes on...'Imperial General is both a fascinating insight into the life of an imperial Roman officer during the period of the Principate, and a rollicking good tale told in Philip Matyszak's trademark lively style.
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The Somme

In mid-February one such stunt included an advance near the village of Miraumont and an enemy salient that included a position known as Boom Ravine. One of the battalions taking part in this 'bite and hold' operation was the 11th Royal ...

Author: Richard van Emden

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473855229

Category: History

Page: 368

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The offensive on the Somme took place between July and November 1916 and is perhaps the most iconic battle of the Great War. It was there that Kitcheners famous Pals Battalions were first sent into action en masse and it was a battlefield where many of the dreams and aspirations of a nation, hopeful of victory, were agonizingly dashed. Because of its legendary status, the Somme has been the subject of many books, and many more will come out next year. However, nothing has ever been published on the Battle in which the soldiers own photographs have been used to illustrate both the campaigns extraordinary comradeship and its carnage.
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Marginal Men

Then nothing but the slow dragging of time, the racket, the flames of the candles dipping and blinking as the Boom Ravine began to boom, the occasional cascades of earth and stones that came rattling down the dugout steps from the ...

Author: Piers Gray

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349081370

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

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In prose and poetry the selections contained here reveal the personal experiences, feelings and angst of three English writers who lived through World War I.
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The Die hards in the Great War 1916 1919

Whilst the assaulting troops were pushing on to the spur south 12TH of Petit Miraumont and the second objective , the dug - out BATTALION . clearing Companies of the 12th Middlesex were at work in Boom 17TH Ravine .

Author: Everard Wyrall

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B742714

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page:

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