Conjuring Hope

... to be distinguished from the discursive symbolism of language proper . of These signs evoke and present due to their virtuality 72 Conjuring Hope.

Author: Galina Lindquist

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845450574

Category: Medical

Page: 251

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Notions of magic and healing have been changing over past years and are now understood as reflecting local ideas of power and agency, as well as structures of self, subjectivity and affect. This study focuses on contemporary urban Russia and, through exploring social conditions, conveys the experience of living that makes magic logical. By following people's own interpretations of the work of magic, the author succeeds in unraveling the logic of local practice and local understanding of affliction, commonly used to diagnose the experiences of illness and misfortune.
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Religion Politics and Globalization

Six years later, in her monograph Conjuring Hope, Galina's emphasis is less on business magic per se than the occult search for the “lost sense of tomor- ...

Author: Galina Lindquist

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9780857459046

Category: Religion

Page: 290

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While social scientists, beginning with Weber, envisioned a secularized world, religion today is forthrightly becoming a defining feature of life all around the globe. The complex connections between religion and politics, and the ways in which globalization shapes these processes, are central themes explored in this volume by leading scholars in the field of religion. Does the holism of numerous past and present day cosmologies mean that religions with their holistic orientations are integral to human existence? What happens when political ideologies and projects are framed as transcendental truths and justified by Divine authority? How are individual and collective identities shaped by religious rhetoric, and what are the consequences? Can mass murder, deemed terrorism, be understood as a form of ritual sacrifice, and if so, what are the implications for our sensibilities and practices as scholars and citizens? Using empirical material, from historical analyses of established religions to the everyday strife of marginalized groups such as migrants and dissident movements, this volume deepens the understanding of processes that shape the contemporary world.
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Between One and One Another

Galina's determination to do justice to the mysteries ofsubjectivity and intersubjectivity helps us understand why, in Conjuring Hope, she often suspends ...

Author: Michael Jackson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520951914

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

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Michael Jackson extends his path-breaking work in existential anthropology by focusing on the interplay between two modes of human existence: that of participating in other peoples’ lives and that of turning inward to one’s self. Grounding his discussion in the subtle shifts between being acted upon and taking action, Jackson shows how the historical complexities and particularities found in human interactions reveal the dilemmas, conflicts, cares, and concerns that shape all of our lives. Through portraits of individuals encountered in the course of his travels, including friends and family, and anthropological fieldwork pursued over many years in such places as Sierra Leone and Australia, Jackson explores variations on this theme. As he describes the ways we address and negotiate the vexed relationships between "I" and "we"—the one and the many—he is also led to consider the place of thought in human life.
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Ethnographies of Waiting

Conjuring Hope. Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. Oxford: Berghahn Books. Lucht, Hans. 2012. Darkness Before Daybreak. African Migrants Living on ...

Author: Manpreet K. Janeja

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474280297

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

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We all wait – in traffic jams, passport offices, school meal queues, for better weather, an end to fighting, peace. Time spent waiting produces hope, boredom, anxiety, doubt, or uncertainty. Ethnographies of Waiting explores the social phenomenon of waiting and its centrality in human society. Using waiting as a central analytical category, the book investigates how waiting is negotiated in myriad ways. Examining the politics and poetics of waiting, Ethnographies of Waiting offers fresh perspectives on waiting as the uncertain interplay between doubting and hoping, and asks "When is time worth the wait?" Waiting thus conceived is intrinsic to the ethnographic method at the heart of the anthropological enterprise. Featuring detailed ethnographies from Japan, Georgia, England, Ghana, Norway, Russia and the United States, a Foreword by Craig Jeffrey and an Afterword by Ghassan Hage, this is a vital contribution to the field of anthropology of time and essential reading for students and scholars in anthropology, sociology and philosophy.
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One Mindful Day at a Time

“Hope and fear cannot occupy the same space at the same time. ... about it with someone who cares about us, then b) practice conjuring hope in its place.

Author: Alan Wolfelt

Publisher: Companion Press

ISBN: 9781617222658

Category: Self-Help

Page: 384

View: 819

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For most of us, life is way too hectic. We feel scattered and distracted. We’re busy rushing from one required activity to the next, and when we have a few moments of downtime, we’re often glued to our electronics. Is this what life is really all about? Learn to slow down and live more mindfully with this daily companion. In one brief entry for each day of the calendar year, counselor Dr. Alan Wolfelt offers small, day-at-a-time doses of wisdom and practical guidance. Each entry includes an inspiring or soothing quote followed by a short discussion of the day’s theme as well as a succinct mantra to return to throughout the day. In just a few minutes a day, this little gem of a book will teach you to live every moment from a place of peace, purpose, and gratitude. Living in the now is a habit you can cultivate. Let’s get started.
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Urban Hunters

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2005. Lucht, Hans. Darkness before Daybreak: African Migrants Living on ...

Author: Lars Hojer

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300249552

Category: History

Page: 320

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An ethnography of the Mongolian capital city of Ulaanbaatar during the nation’s transition from socialism to a market-based economic system Urban Hunters is an ethnography of the Mongolian capital city, Ulaanbaatar, during the nation’s transition from socialism to a market-based economic system. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse in 1991, Mongolia entered a period of economic chaos characterized by wild inflation, disappearing banks, and closing farms, factories, and schools. During this time of widespread poverty, a generation of young adults came of age. In exploring the social, cultural, and existential ramifications of a transition that has become permanent and acquired a logic of its own, Lars Højer and Morten Axel Pedersen present a new theorization of social agency in postsocialist as well as postcolonial contexts.
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A Future and a Hope

Chapter Three Conjuring Hope in a Body : Lucille Clifton's Poetry the world is turning in the body of Jesus and the future is possible -- " spring song " by ...

Author: Tiffany Eberle Kriner

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89089212237

Category:

Page: 267

View: 408

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Living Faithfully in an Unjust World

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. New York: Berghahn Books. Livshin, Alexander. 2006. “Russian Philanthropy Now Making a Difference.

Author: Melissa L. Caldwell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520285835

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 238

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What does it mean to be a compassionate, caring person in Russia, which has become a country of stark income inequalities and political restrictions? How might ethics and practices of kindness constitute a mode of civic participation in which “doing good”—helping, caring for, and loving one another in a world marked by many problems and few easy solutions—is a necessary part of being an active citizen? Living Faithfully in an Unjust World explores how, following the retreat of the Russian state from social welfare services, Russians’ efforts to “do the right thing” for their communities have forged new modes of social justice and civic engagement. Through vivid ethnography based on twenty years of research within a thriving Moscow-based network of religious and secular charitable service providers, Melissa L. Caldwell examines how community members care for a broad range of Russia’s population, in Moscow and beyond, through programs that range from basic health services to human rights advocacy. As the experiences of assistance workers, government officials, recipients, and supporters reveal, their work and beliefs are shaped by a practical philosophy of goodness and kindness. Despite the hardships these individuals witness on a regular basis, there is a pervasive sense of optimism that human kindness will prevail over poverty, injury, and injustice. Ultimately, what connects members of this diverse group is a shared belief that caring for others is not simply a practical matter or an idealistic vision but a project of faith and hope. Together care-seekers and care-givers destabilize and remake the meaning of “faith” and “faith-based” by putting into practice a vision of humanitarianism that transcends the boundaries between state and private, religious and secular.
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Plants Health and Healing

Volume 1 Conjuring Hope : Magic and Healing in Contemporary Russia Galina Lindquist Volume 6 Plants , Health and Healing : On the Interface of Ethnobotany ...

Author: Elisabeth Hsu

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845450604

Category: Nature

Page: 316

View: 870

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Plants have cultural histories, and their culturally known applications change through time and across contexts. The impact of individual plant species on human cultures has been profound, whether it is the coca and quinine from South America or tea and coffee from the Old World. This pattern is seen in all types of uses that humans make of plants, from trees used for construction, through species used for perfume through to food plants. However, it is medicinal plants that have attracted considerable attention recently, whether as a justification of plant conservation efforts or through the perception that direct use of medicinal plants may offer something that is not delivered by orthodox medicine. Nevertheless, surprisingly little research has been done on the interface of ethnobotany and medical anthropology. This volume makes an important contribution to filling this gap. Its two central aims are to demonstrate that plant knowledge is not paradigmatic positive knowledge but situational and arises in relationships, and to show that modern medicinal plant discovery can be viewed as the epitome of a long history of borrowing, stealing, and exchanging plants.
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From Something to Nothing

... For a general discussion of magic in contemporary Russia, see Galina Lindquist, Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. (Paperback ed.) ...

Author: Daniel Maoz

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527535039

Category: Social Science

Page: 562

View: 354

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Jewish mysticism approaches God as no-thing or nothing, reflecting Judaism’s traditional identification of God as incorporeal. Whereas technical philosophical language often employed to discuss Jewish mysticism has a tendency to ward off otherwise interested readers, this study sufficiently breaks down the technical language of Jewish mysticism in its various expressions to allow a beginner to benefit from what may otherwise be indescribable and only approached by consideration of what is not rather than what is. Integral to the title, From Something to Nothing, is the concept that God cannot be something, because that would be restricting, so God is simply no-thing. Ironically, the conventional religious expression for the biblical notion of creation is “something from nothing”, whereas the title of this volume is its precise opposite, which may at first seem to be illogical – creation in reverse. However, in a volume dedicated to various deliberations on magic and mysticism, the ultimate reality may receive expression as nothingness, that is, no-thingness, no quality associated with things. What adds to our difficulty today is that nothingness is inextricably linked with silence. Is silence also an element or indication of an ultimate reality or its absence? Or is it merely the reflection of nothing whatsoever? This is at the heart of modern debates between atheists and believers. Believers feel that even this silence speaks to this ultimate reality, whereas atheists claim that if you cannot show it, then you do not know it. In other words, believers are victims of their own wishful thinking. From Something to Nothing memorializes Canadian mystic and scholar Zalman Schachter Shalomi, z”l, engaging in particular aspects that he addressed at some phase of his colourful and erudite life, providing the reader with a broad spectrum of both phenomenological and intellectual topics.
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Not Quite Shamans

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. Oxford: Berghahn. Macdonald, Alexander W., ed. 1997. Mandala and Landscape.

Author: Morten Axel Pedersen

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801461413

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

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The forms of contemporary society and politics are often understood to be diametrically opposed to any expression of the supernatural; what happens when those forms are themselves regarded as manifestations of spirits and other occult phenomena? In Not Quite Shamans, Morten Axel Pedersen explores how the Darhad people of Northern Mongolia's remote Shishged Valley have understood and responded to the disruptive transition to postsocialism by engaging with shamanic beliefs and practices associated with the past. For much of the twentieth century, Mongolia’s communist rulers attempted to eradicate shamanism and the shamans who once served as spiritual guides and community leaders. With the transition from a collectivized economy and a one-party state to a global capitalist market and liberal democracy in the 1990s, the people of the Shishged were plunged into a new and harsh world that seemed beyond their control. "Not-quite-shamans"—young, unemployed men whose undirected energies erupted in unpredictable, frightening bouts of violence and drunkenness that seemed occult in their excess— became a serious threat to the fabric of community life. Drawing on long-term fieldwork in Northern Mongolia, Pedersen details how, for many Darhads, the postsocialist state itself has become shamanic in nature. In the ideal version of traditional Darhad shamanism, shamans can control when and for what purpose their souls travel, whether to other bodies, landscapes, or worlds. Conversely, caught between uncontrollable spiritual powers and an excessive display of physical force, the "not-quite-shamans" embody the chaotic forms—the free market, neoliberal reform, and government corruption—that have created such upheaval in peoples’ lives. As an experimental ethnography of recent political and economic transformations in Mongolia through the defamiliarizing prism of shamans and their lack, Not Quite Shamans is an attempt to write about as well as theorize postsocialism, and shamanism, in a new way.
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Folk Healing and Health Care Practices in Britain and Ireland

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. Oxford: Berghahn. Lupton, D. 1994. Medicine as Culture: Illness, Disease and the Body in Western ...

Author: Ronnie Moore

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845458423

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 132

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Folk, alternative and complementary health care practices in contemporary Western society are currently experiencing a renaissance, albeit with features that are unique to this historical moment. At the same time biomedicine is under scrutiny, experiencing a number of distinct and multifaceted crises. In this volume the authors draw together cutting edge cross-cultural, interdisciplinary research in Britain and Ireland, focusing on exploring the role and significance of healing practices in diverse local contexts, such as the use of crystals, herbs, cures and charms, potions and lotions.
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Romanian for Sale

... spiritualgurunothingman conjuring hope then tripping up on his delightful chord 309911” T Lyn/100 lights from the snow making your cheeks NZSN LIGHTS.

Author: Bogdan Tiganov

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9780595284047

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 124

View: 309

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Romanian For Sale is a bullet through the heart of society. It explores the contradictions of the modern world and the problems of the individual.
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Religion Morality and Community in Post Soviet Societies

See also, e.g., Balzer, Tenacity of Ethnicity; Lindquist, Conjuring Hope; and Margaret Paxson, Solovyovo: The Story of Memory in a Russian Village ...

Author: Mark D. Steinberg

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253220387

Category: History

Page: 350

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The resurgent role of religion in post-Soviet Russia and Eurasia
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Governing Habits

Conjuring Hope: Magic and Healing in Contemporary Russia. New York: Berghahn Books. Lipgart, N.K., A. V. Goloburda, and V. V. Ivanov. 1991.

Author: Eugene Raikhel

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501707056

Category: Medical

Page: 264

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Critics of narcology—as addiction medicine is called in Russia—decry it as being "backward," hopelessly behind contemporary global medical practices in relation to addiction and substance abuse, and assume that its practitioners lack both professionalism and expertise. On the basis of his research in a range of clinical institutions managing substance abuse in St. Petersburg, Eugene Raikhel increasingly came to understand that these assumptions and critiques obscured more than they revealed. Governing Habits is an ethnography of extraordinary sensitivity and awareness that shows how therapeutic practice and expertise is expressed in the highly specific, yet rapidly transforming milieu of hospitals, clinics, and rehabilitation centers in post-Soviet Russia. Rather than interpreting narcology as a Soviet survival or a local clinical world on the wane in the face of globalizing evidence-based medicine, Raikhel examines the transformation of the medical management of alcoholism in Russia over the past twenty years. Raikhel's book is more than a story about the treatment of alcoholism. It is also a gripping analysis of the many cultural, institutional, political, and social transformations taking place in the post-Soviet world, particularly in Putin's Russia. Governing Habits will appeal to a wide range of readers, from medical anthropologists, clinicians, to scholars of post-Soviet Russia, to students of institutions and organizational change, to those interested in therapies and treatments of substance abuse, addiction, and alcoholism.
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Shamanism and Violence

... 'conjuring hope' in Galena Lindquist's (2005) apt turn of phrase. However theatrical these encounters, with their stage prop knives and tridents, ...

Author: Davide Torri

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317055938

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 192

View: 484

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Proposing a new theoretical framework, this book explores Shamanism’s links with violence from a global perspective. Contributors, renowned anthropologists and authorities in the field, draw on their research in Mongolia, China, Korea, Malaysia, Nepal, India, Siberia, America, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan to investigate how indigenous shamanic cultures dealt, and are still dealing with, varying degrees of internal and external violence. During ceremonies shamans act like hunters and warriors, dealing with many states related to violence, such as collective and individual suffering, attack, conflict and antagonism. Indigenous religious complexes are often called to respond to direct and indirect competition with more established cultural and religious traditions which undermine the sociocultural structure, the sense of identity and the state of well-being of many indigenous groups. This book explores a more sensitive vision of shamanism, closer to the emic views of many indigenous groups.
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Living without the Dead

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. Oxford: Berghahn Books. Lucian of Samosata. 2nd century AD. Bion Prasis [Greek title] or Vitarum ...

Author: Piers Vitebsky

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226407876

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 259

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Just one generation ago, the Sora tribe in India lived in a world populated by the spirits of their dead, who spoke to them through shamans in trance. Every day, they negotiated their wellbeing in heated arguments or in quiet reflections on their feelings of love, anger, and guilt. Today, young Sora are rejecting the worldview of their ancestors and switching their allegiance to warring sects of fundamentalist Christianity or Hinduism. Communion with ancestors is banned as sacred sites are demolished, female shamans are replaced by male priests, and debate with the dead gives way to prayer to gods. For some, this shift means liberation from jungle spirits through literacy, employment, and democratic politics; others despair for fear of being forgotten after death. How can a society abandon one understanding of reality so suddenly and see the world in a totally different way? Over forty years, anthropologist Piers Vitebsky has shared the lives of shamans, pastors, ancestors, gods, policemen, missionaries, and alphabet worshippers, seeking explanations from social theory, psychoanalysis, and theology. Living without the Dead lays bare today’s crisis of indigenous religions and shows how historical reform can bring new fulfillments—but also new torments and uncertainties. Vitebsky explores the loss of the Sora tradition as one for greater humanity: just as we have been losing our wildernesses, so we have been losing a diverse range of cultural and spiritual possibilities, tribe by tribe. From the award-winning author of The Reindeer People, this is a heartbreaking story of cultural change and the extinction of an irreplaceable world, even while new religious forms come into being to take its place.
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Plain Fear Forgiven

Was that his name gliding on the wind or only her mind conjuring hope? She looked around but saw nothing out of the ordinary. Downtown on a Wednesday night ...

Author: Leanna Ellis

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402279805

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 804

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"Leanna Ellis has written an emotionally powerful story with an unusual twist to the vampire legend."—Nina Bangs, USA Today bestselling author What Must We Sacrifice to be Forgiven? Evil returns to Promise, Pennsylvania in this gripping finale of the Amish vampire trilogy... Samuel Fisher has committed a sin of biblical proportions—he killed his own brother, Jacob. Haunted by guilt and talked by a vampire out for his soul, Samuel starts down the same dark path of destruction that led to his brother's death. A captivating coming-of-age story unlike any other, Plain Fear: Forgiven pits redemption against temptation, love against fear, and simple faith against the intricacies of sin and salvation. In the gripping final battle between hunters and vampires, Samuel must choose where his loyalties lie. The lives of those he loves—as well as his own ultimate forgiveness—hangs in the balance. Praise for Plain Fear: Forsaken: "An intense, powerful novel of love and loss, deception and deliverance."—Nancy Haddock, bestselling author of Always the Vampire "In a word...captivating. Leanna Ellis creates a world seemingly simplistic but teeming with complexity. Forsaken is a book you won't want to miss."—Elisabeth Naughton, author Tempted "Leanna Ellis takes readers on a thrilling journey to the dark side of Amish life and beyond. Forsaken exemplifies the ultimate literary juxtaposition of good and evil, and is made all the more powerful by Ellis's ability to paint a vivid and realistic picture of Amish life."—Linda Castillo, New York Times bestselling author
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Possession Power and the New Age

Lindquist , Galina ( 2006 ) , Conjuring Hope : Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia , Oxford : Berghahn . Locke , Ralph G. ( 1983 ) , “ Who am I in the ...

Author: Matthew Wood

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 075463339X

Category: Religion

Page: 203

View: 534

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This book provides a new sociological account of contemporary religious phenomena such as channelling, holistic healing, meditation and divination, which are usually classed as part of a New Age Movement. Drawing on his extensive ethnography carried out in the UK, alongside comparative studies in America and Europe, Matthew Wood criticises the view that such phenomena represent spirituality in which self-authority is paramount. Instead, he emphasises the role of social authority and the centrality of spirit possession, linking these to participants' class positions and experiences of secularisation.Informed by sociological and anthropological approaches to social power and practice, especially the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault, Wood's study explores what he calls the nonformative regions of the religious field, and charts similarities and differences with pagan, spiritualist and Theosophical traditions.
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Health and Wealth on the Bosnian Market

Conjuring Hope: Healing and Magic in Contemporary Russia. New York: Berghahn Books. Lock, Margaret. 1993. Encounters with Aging: Mythologies of Menopause in ...

Author: Larisa Jasarevic

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253023858

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 246

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Larisa Jasarevic offers an unforgettable look at the everyday experiences of people living in post-socialist, post-war Bosnia. Not at all existing on the world's margins, Bosnians today are concerned with the good life and are as entangled in consumer debt as everyone else. The insecurities of living in an economy dominated by informal networks of trade, personal credit, and indebtedness are experienced by Bosnians in terms of physical ailments, some not recognized by Western medical science. Jasarevic follows ordinary Bosnians in their search for treatment--from use of pharmaceuticals to alternative medicines and folk healers of various kinds. Financial well-being and health are woven together for Bosnians, and Jasarevic adeptly traces the links between the two realms. In the process, she addresses a number of themes that have been important in studies of life under neoliberalism in other parts of the world.
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