Desire and Domestic Fiction

"A strikingly original treatment of the rise of the novel, Desire and Domestic Fiction makes a major contribution to feminist theory, to the understanding of the role of gender in culture and its relation to political change, and to studies ...

Author: Nancy Armstrong

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195061604

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 607

Download →

Desire and Domestic Fiction argues that far from being removed from historical events, novels by writers from Richardson to Woolf were themselves agents of the rise of the middle class. Drawing on texts that range from 18th-century female conduct books and contract theory to modern psychoanalytic case histories and theories of reading, Armstrong shows that the emergence of a particular form of female subjectivity capable of reigning over the household paved the way for the establishment of institutions which today are accepted centers of political power. Neither passive subjects nor embattled rebels, the middle-class women who were authors and subjects of the major tradition of British fiction were among the forgers of a new form of power that worked in, and through, their writing to replace prevailing notions of "identity" with a gender-determined subjectivity. Examining the works of such novelists as Samuel Richardson, Jane Austen, and the Bront�s, she reveals the ways in which these authors rewrite the domestic practices and sexual relations of the past to create the historical context through which modern institutional power would seem not only natural but also humane, and therefore to be desired.
Posted in:

Desire and Domestic Fiction

A Political History of the Novel Nancy Armstrong ... acquires all the qualities of the prosperous male who—as the conduct books promise—desires nothing so much as the female accomplishments that conduct books describe in glowing terms.

Author: Nancy Armstrong

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199879038

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 935

Download →

Desire and Domestic Fiction argues that far from being removed from historical events, novels by writers from Richardson to Woolf were themselves agents of the rise of the middle class. Drawing on texts that range from 18th-century female conduct books and contract theory to modern psychoanalytic case histories and theories of reading, Armstrong shows that the emergence of a particular form of female subjectivity capable of reigning over the household paved the way for the establishment of institutions which today are accepted centers of political power. Neither passive subjects nor embattled rebels, the middle-class women who were authors and subjects of the major tradition of British fiction were among the forgers of a new form of power that worked in, and through, their writing to replace prevailing notions of "identity" with a gender-determined subjectivity. Examining the works of such novelists as Samuel Richardson, Jane Austen, and the Bront?s, she reveals the ways in which these authors rewrite the domestic practices and sexual relations of the past to create the historical context through which modern institutional power would seem not only natural but also humane, and therefore to be desired.
Posted in:

The Novel

... Rene ́ 208, 465, 466, 467, 468 description, and narrative 230–1 desire Armstrong on domestic fiction and 622–40 Brooks on desire for the end 331, 332 J. Hillis Miller and desire for reference 196 Sedgwick on homosocial desire 565–6, ...

Author: Dorothy J. Hale

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405151078

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 840

View: 651

Download →

The Novel: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory1900–2000 is a collection of the most influentialwritings on the theory of the novel from the twentiethcentury. Traces the rise of novel theory and the extension of itsinfluence into other disciplines, especially social, cultural andpolitical theory. Broad in scope, including sections on formalism; the ChicagoSchool; structuralism and narratology; deconstruction;psychoanalysis; Marxism; social discourse; gender;post-colonialism; and more. Includes whole essays or chapters wherever possible. Headnotes introduce and link each piece, enabling readers todraw connections between different schools of thought. Encourages students to approach theoretical texts withconfidence, applying the same skills they bring to literarytexts. Includes a volume introduction, a selected bibliography, anindex of topics and short author biographies to support study.
Posted in:

The Powers of Distance

A prime example of this approach would be Nancy Armstrong's Desire and Domestic Fiction : A Political History of the Novel , which provocatively asserts , " the modern individual is first and foremost a female .

Author: Amanda Anderson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691074976

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 689

Download →

Combining analysis of Victorian literature and culture with forceful theoretical argument, The Powers of Distance examines the progressive potential of those forms of cultivated detachment associated with Enlightenment and modern thought. Amanda Anderson explores a range of practices in nineteenth-century British culture, including methods of objectivity in social science, practices of omniscience in artistic realism, and the complex forms of affiliation in Victorian cosmopolitanism. Anderson demonstrates that many writers--including George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, Charlotte Brontë, Matthew Arnold, and Oscar Wilde--thoughtfully address the challenging moral questions that attend stances of detachment. In so doing, she offers a revisionist account of Victorian culture and a tempered defense of detachment as an ongoing practice and aspiration. The Powers of Distance illuminates its historical object of study and provides a powerful example for its theoretical argument, showing that an ideal of critical detachment underlies the ironic modes of modernism and postmodernism as well as the tradition of Enlightenment thought and critical theory. Its broad understanding of detachment and cultivated distance, together with its focused historical analysis, will appeal to theorists and critics across the humanities, particularly those working in literary and cultural studies, feminism, and postcolonialism. Original in scope and thesis, this book constitutes a major contribution to literary history and contemporary theory.
Posted in:

The English Novel 1700 1740

It might have an explicitly female source , concentrate on women's experience , address an audience of young middle - class ladies , and find itself censored by female reviewers . 175 ----- Desire and domestic fiction : A ...

Author: Robert Ignatius Letellier

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313317461

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 625

View: 755

Download →

The English novel written between 1700 and 1740 remains a comparatively neglected area. In addition to Daniel Defoe, whose Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders are landmarks in the history of English fiction, many other authors were at work. This bibliography provides a listing of novels and critical materials pertinent to them. It additionally includes entries for bibliographies, anthologies, and studies that illuminate the cultural, political, and historical background of the period. Entries include annotations, and the volume is fully indexed.
Posted in:

Domestic Allegories of Political Desire

The novels not only represent the desire for social equality but that for female agency, whether in the home or the community, in domestic tropes as well. In fact, the consummation of the domestic ideal of marriage, prescribed by the ...

Author: Claudia Tate

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019536080X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 380

Download →

Why did African-American women novelists use idealized stories of bourgeois courtship and marriage to mount arguments on social reform during the last decade of the nineteenth century, during a time when resurgent racism conditioned the lives of all black Americans? Such stories now seem like apolitical fantasies to contemporary readers. This is the question at the center of Tate's examination of the novels of Pauline Hopkins, Emma Kelley, Amelia Johnson, Katherine Tillman, and Frances Harper. Domestic Allegories of Political Desire is more than a literary study; it is also a social and intellectual history--a cultural critique of a period that historian Rayford W. Logan called "the Dark Ages of recent American history." Against a rich contextual framework, extending from abolitionist protest to the Black Aesthetic, Tate argues that the idealized marriage plot in these novels does not merely depict the heroine's happiness and economic prosperity. More importantly, that plot encodes a resonant cultural narrative--a domestic allegory--about the political ambitions of an emancipated people. Once this domestic allegory of political desire is unmasked in these novels, it can be seen as a significant discourse of the post-Reconstruction era for representing African-Americans' collective dreams about freedom and for reconstructing those contested dreams into consummations of civil liberty.
Posted in:

The Encyclopedia of the Novel

wrote domestic fiction) and a female literary readership as well as the increasing respectability of the novel as literary ... conduct books) that constitute normative (middle-class, white) configurations of subjectivity and desire; ...

Author:

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118779071

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1024

View: 351

Download →

Now available in a single volume paperback, this advanced reference resource for the novel and novel theory offers authoritative accounts of the history, terminology, and genre of the novel, in over 140 articles of 500-7,000 words. Entries explore the history and tradition of the novel in different areas of the world; formal elements of the novel (story, plot, character, narrator); technical aspects of the genre (such as realism, narrative structure and style); subgenres, including the bildungsroman and the graphic novel; theoretical problems, such as definitions of the novel; book history; and the novel's relationship to other arts and disciplines. The Encyclopedia is arranged in A-Z format and features entries from an international cast of over 140 scholars, overseen by an advisory board of 37 leading specialists in the field, making this the most authoritative reference resource available on the novel. This essential reference, now available in an easy-to-use, fully indexed single volume paperback, will be a vital addition to the libraries of literature students and scholars everywhere.
Posted in:

Keeping the Victorian House

before the age of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English domestic novels (Opie, Classic Fairy Tales, 12). 19. Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction, 108-34. 20. Armstong, Desire and Domestic Fiction, 18. 21.

Author: Vanessa D. Dickerson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317244776

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 487

Download →

First published in 1995. The essays in this volume demonstrate how Victorian women took up various positions along a continuum that ranged from the desire of Shelley’s creature for the power and acceptance it associated with the house to the rejection of Brontë’s heroine of the immobility and powerlessness she ultimately experienced there. More specifically the essays in this volume explore the nature of the Victorian woman’s domestic relations by centring in one activity that most informed her place in what was often the father’s house: housekeeping. The essays in this edition determine how writers, especially novelists, both male and female, used housekeeping to construct, reconstruct, represent, and inscribe the female self and condition. This title will be of interest to students of history and literature.
Posted in:

Reattachment Theory

4 Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction, 7. 5 Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction, 51. 6 Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction, 7. For Armstrong's discussion of Freud's Dora, see Desire and Domestic Fiction, 224–50.

Author: Lee Wallace

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9781478009139

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 596

Download →

In Reattachment Theory Lee Wallace argues that homosexuality—far from being the threat to “traditional” marriage that same-sex marriage opponents have asserted—is so integral to its reimagining that all marriage is gay marriage. Drawing on the history of marriage, Stanley Cavell's analysis of Hollywood comedies of remarriage, and readings of recent gay and lesbian films, Wallace shows that queer experiments in domesticity have reshaped the affective and erotic horizons of heterosexual marriage and its defining principles: fidelity, exclusivity, and endurance. Wallace analyzes a series of films—Dorothy Arzner's Craig's Wife (1936); Tom Ford's A Single Man (2009); Lisa Cholodenko's High Art (1998), Laurel Canyon (2002), and The Kids Are All Right (2010); and Andrew Haigh's Weekend (2011) and 45 Years (2015)—that, she contends, do not simply reflect social and legal changes; they fundamentally alter our sense of what sexual attachment involves as both a social and a romantic form.
Posted in:

The Oxford Companion to Charles Dickens

Another significant characteristic of domestic fiction is its containment and domestication of sexual desire in general and of female desire in particular. Dickens's fiction is celebrated for its domestic set-pieces rather than for its ...

Author: Paul Schlicke

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199640188

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 675

View: 663

Download →

First published 1999 under different title.
Posted in: