English Fictions of Communal Identity 1485 1603

Focusing on prose fiction from Malory's Morte Darthur through the works of Sir Philip Sidney and Thomas Nashe, this study explores the concept of collective agency and the extensive impact it had on English Renaissance culture.

Author: Joshua Phillips

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317143116

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 640

Download →

Challenging a long-standing trend that sees the Renaissance as the end of communal identity and constitutive group affiliation, author Joshua Phillips explores the perseverance of such affiliation throughout Tudor culture. Focusing on prose fiction from Malory's Morte Darthur through the works of Sir Philip Sidney and Thomas Nashe, this study explores the concept of collective agency and the extensive impact it had on English Renaissance culture. In contrast to studies devoted to the myth of early modern individuation, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 1485-1603 pays special attention to primary communities-monastic orders, printing house concerns, literary circles, and neighborhoods-that continued to generate a collective sense of identity. Ultimately, Phillips offers a new way of theorizing the relation between collaboration and identity. In terms of literary history, this study elucidates a significant aspect of novelistic discourse, even as it accounts for the institutional disregard of often brilliant works of early modern fiction.
Posted in:

Handbook of English Renaissance Literature

English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010. Raber, Karen L. “How to Do Things with Animals: Thoughts on/with the Early Modern Cat.” Early Modern Ecostudies. From the Florentine Codex to Shakespeare.

Author: Ingo Berensmeyer

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110444889

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 748

View: 459

Download →

This handbook of English Renaissance literature serves as a reference for both students and scholars, introducing recent debates and developments in early modern studies. Using new theoretical perspectives and methodological tools, the volume offers exemplary close readings of canonical and less well-known texts from all significant genres between c. 1480 and 1660. Its systematic chapters address questions about editing Renaissance texts, the role of translation, theatre and drama, life-writing, science, travel and migration, and women as writers, readers and patrons. The book will be of particular interest to those wishing to expand their knowledge of the early modern period beyond Shakespeare.
Posted in:

Lying in Early Modern English Culture

Phillips, Joshua, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010). Pigman, G. W., III, Grief and English Renaissance Elegy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985). Pilarz, Scott, '“Campion Dead Bites with ...

Author: Andrew Hadfield

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198789468

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 408

View: 169

Download →

Lying in Early Modern English Culture is a major study of ideas of truth and falsehood in early modern England from the advent of the Reformation to the aftermath of the failed Gunpowder Plot. The period is characterised by panic and chaos when few had any idea how religious, cultural, and social life would develop after the traumatic division of Christendom. While many saw the need for a secular power to define the truth others declared that their allegiances belonged elsewhere. Accordingly there was a constant battle between competing authorities for the right to declare what was the truth and so label opponents as liars. Issues of truth and lying were, therefore, a constant feature of everyday life and determined ideas of individual identity, politics, speech, sex, marriage, and social behaviour, as well as philosophy and religion. This book is a cultural history of truth and lying from the 1530s to the 1610s, showing how lying needs to be understood in action as well as in theory. Unlike most histories of lying, it concentrates on a series of particular events reading them in terms of academic theories and more popular notions of lying. The book covers a wide range of material such as the trials of Ann Boleyn and Thomas More, the divorce of Frances Howard, and the murder of Anthony James by Annis and George Dell; works of literature such as Othello, The Faerie Queene, A Mirror for Magistrates, and The Unfortunate Traveller; works of popular culture such as the herring pamphlet of 1597; and major writings by Castiglione, Montaigne, Erasmus, Luther, and Tyndale.
Posted in:

The Typographic Imaginary in Early Modern English Literature

English Fictions of Communal Identity: 14851603. Farnham: Ashgate. Raber, K. 2013. Animal Bodies, Renaissance Culture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Raven, J. 2007. The Business of Books: Booksellers and the English ...

Author: Rachel Stenner

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317012870

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 197

Download →

The typographic imaginary is an aesthetic linking authors from William Caxton to Alexander Pope, this study centrally contends. Early modern English literature engages imaginatively with printing and this book both characterizes that engagement and proposes the typographic imaginary as a framework for its analysis. Certain texts, Rachel Stenner states, describe the people, places, concerns, and processes of printing in ways that, over time, generate their own figurative authority. The typographic imaginary is posited as a literary phenomenon shared by different writers, a wider cultural understanding of printing, and a critical concept for unpicking the particular imaginative otherness that printing introduced to literature. Authors use the typographic imaginary to interrogate their place in an evolving media environment, to assess the value of the printed text, and to analyse the roles of other text-producing agents. This book treats a broad array of authors and forms: printers’ manuals; William Caxton’s paratexts; the pamphlet dialogues of Robert Copland and Ned Ward; poetic miscellanies; the prose fictions of William Baldwin, George Gascoigne, and Thomas Nashe; the poetry and prose of Edmund Spenser; writings by John Taylor and Alexander Pope. At its broadest, this study contributes to an understanding of how technology changes cultures. Located at the crossroads between literary, material, and book historical research, the particular intervention that this work makes is threefold. In describing the typographic imaginary, it proposes a new framework for analysis of print culture. It aims to focus critical engagement on symbolic representations of material forms. Finally, it describes a lineage of late medieval and early modern authors, stretching from the mid-fifteenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries, that are linked by their engagement of a particular aesthetic.
Posted in:

Romancing Treason

Phillips, Joshua, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010). Pincombe, Mike, ed., The Anatomy of Tudor Literature (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001). Pincombe, Mike, and Cathy Shrank, 'Prologue: The Travails of ...

Author: Megan Leitch

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191036859

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 510

Download →

Romancing Treason addresses the scope and significance of the secular literary culture of the Wars of the Roses, and especially of the Middle English romances that were distinctively written in prose during this period. Megan Leitch argues that the pervasive textual presence of treason during the decades c.1437-c.1497 suggests a way of conceptualising the understudied space between the Lancastrian literary culture of the early fifteenth century and the Tudor literary cultures of the early and mid-sixteenth century. Drawing upon theories of political discourse and interpellation, and of the power of language to shape social identities, this book explores the ways in which, in this textual culture, treason is both a source of anxieties about community and identity, and a way of responding to those concerns. Despite the context of decades of civil war, treason is an understudied theme even with regards to Thomas Malory's celebrated prose romance, the Morte Darthur. Leitch accordingly provides a double contribution to Malory criticism by addressing the Morte Darthur's engagement with treason, and by reading the Morte in the hitherto neglected context of the prose romances and other secular literature written by Malory's English contemporaries. This book also offers new insights into the nature and possibilities of the medieval romance genre and sheds light on understudied texts such as the prose Siege of Thebes and Siege of Troy, and the romances William Caxton translated from French. More broadly, this book contributes to reconsiderations of the relationship between medieval and early modern culture by focusing on a comparatively neglected sixty-year interval — the interval that is customarily the dividing line, the 'no man's land' between well—but separately-studied periods in English literary studies.
Posted in:

Writing Early Modern London

Phillips, Joshua English Fictions (2010) of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Farnham: Ashgate). Pocock, J.G.A. (1987) TheAncient Constitution and theFeudalLaw: A Reissuewitha Retrospect (Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress).

Author: A. Gordon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137294920

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 309

Download →

Writing Early Modern London explores how urban community in London was experienced, imagined and translated into textual form. Ranging from previously unstudied manuscripts to major works by Middleton, Stow and Whitney, it examines how memory became a key cultural battleground as rites of community were appropriated in creative ways.
Posted in:

A Weaver Poet and the Plague

English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2010. Phillips, Patrick. “'At Home in His Repair': The Reformation of Plague in Jonson's Epitaphs for John Roe.” Ben Jonson Journal 17.2 (2010): 222–41.

Author: Scott Oldenburg

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271088716

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 868

Download →

William Muggins, an impoverished but highly literate weaver-poet, lived and wrote in London at the turn of the seventeenth century, when few of his contemporaries could even read. A Weaver-Poet and the Plague’s microhistorical approach uses Muggins’s life and writing, in which he articulates a radical vision of a commonwealth founded on labor and mutual aid, as a gateway into a broader narrative about London’s “middling sort” during the plague of 1603. In debt, in prison, and at odds with his livery company, Muggins was forced to move his family from the central London neighborhood called the Poultry to the far poorer and more densely populated parish of St. Olave’s in Southwark. It was here, confined to his home as that parish was devastated by the plague, that Muggins wrote his minor epic, London’s Mourning Garment, in 1603. The poem laments the loss of life and the suffering brought on by the plague but also reflects on the social and economic woes of the city, from the pains of motherhood and childrearing to anxieties about poverty, insurmountable debt, and a system that had failed London’s most vulnerable. Part literary criticism, part microhistory, this book reconstructs Muggins’s household, his reading, his professional and social networks, and his proximity to a culture of radical religion in Southwark. Featuring an appendix with a complete version of London’s Mourning Garment, this volume presents a street-level view of seventeenth-century London that gives agency and voice to a class that is often portrayed as passive and voiceless.
Posted in:

Renaissance Romance

The Transformation of English Prose Fiction, 1570-1620 Nandini Das ... Writing Robert Greene Edited by Kirk Melnikoff and Edward Gieskes English Fictions of Communal Identity , 14851603 Joshua Phillips Mary Sidney , Lady Wroth Margaret ...

Author: Nandini Das

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409410137

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 242

View: 976

Download →

Renaissance Romance examines how and why the fears and expectations surrounding the old genre of romance resonated in early modern England. Examining a range of texts and the fiction of Sir Philip Sidney, Robert Greene and Lady Mary Wroth in particular, Das illustrates the sheer cultural persistence of romance, and reveals how a generational consciousness inherent in the genre transformed the new prose fiction of the period.
Posted in:

The Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature 1500 1700

She received her JD from Stanford and a PhD in English from UC, Irvine. ... He is the author of English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 and has published articles on Spenser, Shakespeare, More, Montaigne, and on early modern ...

Author: Lorna Hutson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191081989

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 650

View: 411

Download →

This Handbook triangulates the disciplines of history, legal history, and literature to produce a new, interdisciplinary framework for the study of early modern England. Scholars of early modern English literature and history have increasingly found that an understanding of how people in the past thought about and used the law is key to understanding early modern familial and social relations as well as important aspects of the political revolution and the emergence of capitalism. Judicial or forensic rhetoric has been shown to foster new habits of literary composition (poetry and drama) and new processes of fact-finding and evidence evaluation. In addition, the post-Reformation jurisdictional dominance of the common law produced new ways of drawing the boundaries between private conscience and public accountability. Accordingly, historians, critics, and legal historians come together in this Handbook to develop accounts of the past that are attentive to the legally purposeful or fictional shaping of events in the historical archive. They also contribute to a transformation of our understanding of the place of forensic modes of inquiry in the creation of imaginative fiction and drama. Chapters in the Handbook approach, from a diversity of perspectives, topics including forensic rhetoric, humanist and legal education, Inns of Court revels, drama, poetry, emblem books, marriage and divorce, witchcraft, contract, property, imagination, oaths, evidence, community, local government, legal reform, libel, censorship, authorship, torture, slavery, liberty, due process, the nation state, colonialism, and empire.
Posted in:

Romance s Rival

English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010. Pike, Judith E. “My Name Was Isabella Linton”: Coverture, Domestic Violence, and Mrs. Heathcliff's Narrative in Wuthering Heights.

Author: Talia Schaffer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190465100

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 749

Download →

Romance's Rival argues that the central plot of the most important genre of the nineteenth century, the marriage plot novel, means something quite different from what we thought. In Victorian novels, women may marry for erotic desire--but they might, instead, insist on "familiar marriage," marrying trustworthy companions who can offer them socially rich lives and futures of meaningful work. Romance's Rival shows how familiar marriage expresses ideas of female subjectivity dating back through the seventeenth century, while romantic marriage felt like a new, risky idea. Undertaking a major rereading of the rise-of-the-novel tradition, from Richardson through the twentieth century, Talia Schaffer rethinks what the novel meant if one tracks familiar-marriage virtues. This alternative perspective offers new readings of major texts (Austen, the Brontës, Eliot, Trollope) but it also foregrounds women's popular fiction (Yonge, Oliphant, Craik, Broughton). Offering a feminist perspective that reads the marriage plot from the woman's point of view, Schaffer inquires why a female character might legitimately wish to marry for something other than passion. For the past half-century, scholars have valorized desire, individuality, and autonomy in the way we read novels; Romance's Rival asks us to look at the other side, to validate the yearning for work, family, company, or social power as legitimate reasons for women's marital choices in Victorian fiction. Comprehensive in its knowledge of several generations of scholarship on the novel, Romance's Rival convinces us to re-examine assumptions about the nature and function of marriage and the role of the novel in helping us not simply imagine marriage but also process changing ideas about what it might look like and how it might serve people.
Posted in:

The Accommodated Animal

... English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2010), 84. 30. Jacques Derrida, The Animal That Therefore IAm, ed. Marie-Louise Mallet, trans. David Wills (New York: Fordham University Press, 2008), 6. 31.

Author: Laurie Shannon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226924182

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 489

Download →

Shakespeare wrote of lions, shrews, horned toads, curs, mastiffs, and hellhounds. But the word “animal” itself only appears very rarely in his work, which was in keeping with sixteenth-century usage. As Laurie Shannon reveals in The Accommodated Animal, the modern human / animal divide first came strongly into play in the seventeenth century, with Descartes’s famous formulation that reason sets humans above other species: “I think, therefore I am.” Before that moment, animals could claim a firmer place alongside humans in a larger vision of belonging, or what she terms cosmopolity. With Shakespeare as her touchstone, Shannon explores the creaturely dispensation that existed until Descartes. She finds that early modern writers used classical natural history and readings of Genesis to credit animals with various kinds of stakeholdership, prerogative, and entitlement, employing the language of politics in a constitutional vision of cosmic membership. Using this political idiom to frame cross-species relations, Shannon argues, carried with it the notion that animals possess their own investments in the world, a point distinct from the question of whether animals have reason. It also enabled a sharp critique of the tyranny of humankind. By answering “the question of the animal” historically, The Accommodated Animal makes a brilliant contribution to cross-disciplinary debates engaging animal studies, political theory, intellectual history, and literary studies.
Posted in:

The Elizabethan Top Ten

Orlin, Lena Cowen, 'Fictions of the early modern English probate inventory', in Henry S. Turner (ed.), The Culture of Capital (New York: ... Phillips, Joshua, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010).

Author: Emma Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317034452

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 565

Download →

Engaging with histories of the book and of reading, as well as with studies of material culture, this volume explores ’popularity’ in early modern English writings. Is ’popular’ best described as a theoretical or an empirical category in this period? How can we account for the gap between modern canonicity and early modern print popularity? How might we weight the evidence of popularity from citations, serial editions, print runs, reworkings, or extant copies? Is something that sells a lot always popular, even where the readership for print is only a small proportion of the population, or does popular need to carry something of its etymological sense of the public, the people? Four initial chapters sketch out the conceptual and evidential issues, while the second part of the book consists of ten short chapters-a ’hit parade’- in which eminent scholars take a genre or a single exemplar - play, romance, sermon, or almanac, among other categories-as a means to articulate more general issues. Throughout, the aim is to unpack and interrogate assumptions about the popular, and to decentre canonical narratives about, for example, the sermons of Donne or Andrewes over Smith, or the plays of Shakespeare over Mucedorus. Revisiting Elizabethan literary culture through the lenses of popularity, this collection allows us to view the subject from an unfamiliar angle-in which almanacs are more popular than sonnets and proclamations more numerous than plays, and in which authors familiar to us are displaced by names now often forgotten.
Posted in:

Paper Monsters

English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603. Farnham: Ashgate, 2010. Preiss, Richard. Clowning and Authorship in Early Modern Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Prendergast, Maria Teresa Micaela.

Author: Samuel Fallon

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812251296

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 755

Download →

In Paper Monsters, Samuel Fallon charts the striking rise, at the turn to the seventeenth century, of a new species of textual being: the serial, semifictional persona. When Thomas Nashe introduced his charismatic alter ego Pierce Penilesse in a 1592 text, he described the figure as a "paper monster," not fashioned but "begotten" into something curiously like life. The next decade bore this description out, as Pierce took on a life of his own, inspiring other writers to insert him into their own works. And Pierce was hardly alone: such figures as the polemicist Martin Marprelate, the lovers Philisides and Astrophil, the shepherd-laureate Colin Clout, the prodigal wit Euphues, and, in an odd twist, the historical author Robert Greene all outgrew their fictional origins, moving from text to text and author to author, purporting to speak their own words, even surviving their creators' deaths, and installing themselves in the process as agents at large in the real world of writing, publication, and reception. In seeking to understand these "paper monsters" as a historically specific and rather short-lived phenomenon, Fallon looks to the rapid expansion of the London book trade in the years of their ascendancy. Personae were products of print, the medium that rendered them portable, free-floating figures. But they were also the central fictions of a burgeoning literary field: they embodied that field's negotiations between manuscript and print, and they forged a new form of public, textual selfhood. Sustained by the appropriative rewritings they inspired, personae came to seem like autonomous citizens of the literary public. Fallon argues that their status as collective fictions, passed among writers, publishers, and readers, positioned personae as the animating figures of what we have come to call "print culture."
Posted in:

Christopher Marlowe Theatrical Commerce and the Book Trade

Phillips, Joshua (2010), English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Farnham, UK: Ashgate). Pollard, A. W. (1909),Shakespeare Folios and Quartos: A Study in the Bibliography of Shakespeare's Plays, 1594–1685 (London: Methuen). and ...

Author: Kirk Melnikoff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108642064

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 734

Download →

Presenting the first exploration of Christopher Marlowe's complex place in the canon, this collection reads Marlowe's work against an extensive backdrop of repertory, publication, transmission, and reception. Wide-ranging and thoughtful chapters consider Marlowe's deliberate engagements with the stage and print culture, the agents and methods involved in the transmission of his work, and his cultural reception in the light of repertory and print evidence. With contributions from major international scholars, the volume considers all of Marlowe's oeuvre, offering illuminating approaches to his extended animation in theatre and print, from the putative theatrical debut of Tamburlaine in 1587 to the most current editions of his work.
Posted in:

IBERIAN CHIVALRIC ROMANCE

... English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Ashgate, UK: Farnham, 2009), 129. Wilson views Munday's handling of his sources as part of a personal translation enterprise. See “Serial Publication and Romance,” in The Elizabethan ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781487539009

Category:

Page:

View: 861

Download →

Posted in:

Solitude and Speechlessness

English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010. Phillips, Mark Salber. Society and Sentiment: Genres of Historical Writing in Britain, 1740–1820. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. Philostratus.

Author: Andrew Mattison

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487504045

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 535

Download →

Recent literary criticism, along with academic culture at large, has stressed collaboration as essential to textual creation and sociability as a literary and academic virtue. Solitude and Speechlessness proposes an alternative understanding of writing with a complementary mode of reading: literary engagement, it suggests, is the meeting of strangers, each in a state of isolation. The Renaissance authors discussed in this study did not necessarily work alone or without collaborators, but they were uncertain who would read their writings and whether those readers would understand them. These concerns are represented in their work through tropes, images, and characterizations of isolation. The figure of the isolated, misunderstood, or misjudged poet is a preoccupation that relies on imagining the lives of wandering and complaining youths, eloquent melancholics, exemplary hermits, homeless orphans, and retiring stoics; such figures acknowledge the isolation in literary experience. As a response to this isolation of literary connection, Solitude and Speechlessness proposes an interpretive mode it defines as strange reading: a reading that merges comprehension with indeterminacy and the imaginative work of interpretation with the recognition of historical difference.
Posted in:

The Corporate Commonwealth

Pluralism and Political Fictions in England, 1516-1651 Henry S. Turner. Parker, Henry. Observations upon some of his ... Parks, G. B. Richard Hakluyt and the English Voyages. 2nd ed. ... English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603.

Author: Henry S. Turner

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226363356

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 453

Download →

At a time when the standing and status of corporations is much in the news, this study of the early modern history of the concept of the corporation is particularly timely. Henry S. Turner provides a new account of early modern political institutions and political concepts by turning to the history of the corporation as a type of notional person and as a way of organizing collective life. Universities, guilds, towns and cities, religious confraternities, joint-stock companies: all were legal corporations, and all enjoyed rights and freedoms that sometimes exceeded the authority of the State. Drawing on the resources of economic and colonial history, literary criticism, law, political philosophy, and the history of science, Turner reads works by Thomas More, William Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, and Thomas Hobbes, among many others, to find the resources for a new account of corporations as fictional bodies and persons endowed with identities, rights, and the capacity for action. Turner tackles a number of fascinating questions: How did early modern writers make sense of the paradoxical essence of the corporationa collectivity at once imaginary and material, coherent but unbounded, many and at the same time one? And what can the history of the corporation tell us about the history of our own moment, when public goods are increasingly privatized and citizens seek new models of association and meaningful political action? His answers will be of compelling interest to historians, political theorists, literary scholars, and others."
Posted in:

Futile Pleasures

Joshua Phillips, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Farnham, U.K.: Ashgate, 2010), 39. See also Roger Dalrymple, Language and Piety in Middle English Romance (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2000), 144. 44.

Author: Corey McEleney

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823272679

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 286

Download →

Honorable Mention, 2018 MLA Prize for a First Book Against the defensive backdrop of countless apologetic justifications for the value of literature and the humanities, Futile Pleasures reframes the current conversation by returning to the literary culture of early modern England, a culture whose defensive posture toward literature rivals and shapes our own. During the Renaissance, poets justified the value of their work on the basis of the notion that the purpose of poetry is to please and instruct, that it must be both delightful and useful. At the same time, many of these writers faced the possibility that the pleasures of literature may be in conflict with the demand to be useful and valuable. Analyzing the rhetoric of pleasure and the pleasure of rhetoric in texts by William Shakespeare, Roger Ascham, Thomas Nashe, Edmund Spenser, and John Milton, McEleney explores the ambivalence these writers display toward literature’s potential for useless, frivolous vanity. Tracing that ambivalence forward to the modern era, this book also shows how contemporary critics have recapitulated Renaissance humanist ideals about aesthetic value. Against a longstanding tradition that defensively advocates for the redemptive utility of literature, Futile Pleasures both theorizes and performs the queer pleasures of futility. Without ever losing sight of the costs of those pleasures, McEleney argues that playing with futility may be one way of moving beyond the impasses that modern humanists, like their early modern counterparts, have always faced.
Posted in:

The Brand of Print

Phillips, Joshua, English Fictions of Communal Identity, 14851603 (Abingdon: Routledge, 2010). Pincus, Steve, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Devon, PA: Yale University Press, 2009). Plant, Marjorie, The English Book: An Economic ...

Author: Andrea Silva

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004410244

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 642

Download →

The Brand of Print uses contemporary marketing theory to analyze prefaces, dedications, and other paratexts authored by early English printers, publishers, and booksellers as a unique genre, showcasing how these "print agents" developed niche markets by building relationships with readers.
Posted in: