Experimental Irish Theatre

edited by Bernadette Sweeney and Marie Kelly, has also added greatly to our understanding of this most experimental of Irish theatre-makers.9 In an interview in 2001 Thomas Kilroy stated: I would see my playwriting as not being very ...

Author: I. Walsh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137001368

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 202

View: 743

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This book examines experimental Irish theatre that ran counter to the naturalistic 'peasant' drama synonymous with Irish playwriting. Focusing on four marginalised playwrights after Yeats, it charts a tradition linking the experimentation of the early Irish theatre movement with the innovation of contemporary Irish and international drama.
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Experimental Irish Theatre

This book examines experimental Irish theatre that ran counter to the naturalistic 'peasant' drama synonymous with Irish playwriting.

Author: I. Walsh

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 1349336602

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 202

View: 923

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This book examines experimental Irish theatre that ran counter to the naturalistic 'peasant' drama synonymous with Irish playwriting. Focusing on four marginalised playwrights after Yeats, it charts a tradition linking the experimentation of the early Irish theatre movement with the innovation of contemporary Irish and international drama.
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The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre

In 1919, Robinson and Yeats had founded the Dublin Drama League, an independent experimental company that staged modern European plays in translation and the work of contemporary avantgarde playwrights such as Eugene O'Neill.

Author: Nicholas Grene

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191016349

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 688

View: 424

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The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre provides the single most comprehensive survey of the field to be found in a single volume. Drawing on more than forty contributors from around the world, the book addresses a full range of topics relating to modern Irish theatre from the late nineteenth-century theatre to the most recent works of postdramatic devised theatre. Ireland has long had an importance in the world of theatre out of all proportion to the size of the country, and has been home to four Nobel Laureates (Yeats, Shaw, and Beckett; Seamus Heaney, while primarily a poet, also wrote for the stage). This collection begins with the influence of melodrama, looks at arguably the first modern Irish playwright, Oscar Wilde, before moving into a series of considerations of the Abbey Theatre, and Irish modernism. Arranged chronologically, it explores areas such as women in theatre, Irish-language theatre, and alternative theatres, before reaching the major writers of more recent Irish theatre, including Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, and their successors. There are also individual chapters focusing on Beckett and Shaw, as well as a series of chapters looking at design, acting and theatre architecture. The book concludes with an extended survey of the critical literature on the field. In each chapter, the author does not simply rehearse accepted wisdom; all of the authors push the boundaries of their respective fields, so that each chapter is a significant contribution to scholarship in its own right.
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The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Irish Theatre and Performance

In terms of fostering new aesthetics and experimental work in Ireland, the roles of the Dublin Theatre Festival (DTF; founded in 1957), Project Arts Centre (founded 1966), and, as stated by Ryan, the Dublin Fringe Festival (founded ...

Author: Eamonn Jordan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137585882

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 866

View: 326

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This Handbook offers a multiform sweep of theoretical, historical, practical and personal glimpses into a landscape roughly characterised as contemporary Irish theatre and performance. Bringing together a spectrum of voices and sensibilities in each of its four sections — Histories, Close-ups, Interfaces, and Reflections — it casts its gaze back across the past sixty years or so to recall, analyse, and assess the recent legacy of theatre and performance on this island. While offering information, overviews and reflections of current thought across its chapters, this book will serve most handily as food for thought and a springboard for curiosity. Offering something different in its mix of themes and perspectives, so that previously unexamined surfaces might come to light individually and in conjunction with other essays, it is a wide-ranging and indispensable resource in Irish theatre studies.
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Irish Drama Modernity and the Passion Play

Offering readings of over twenty plays from the time of the Irish Literary Revival to the present day, ... Finally, important recent books have focused on experimental aspects of Irish Theatre in an attempt to revise the notion that the ...

Author: Alexandra Poulain

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349949632

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 910

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This book discusses Irish Passion plays (plays that rewrite or parody the story of the Passion of Christ) in modern Irish drama from the Irish Literary Revival to the present day. It offers innovative readings of such canonical plays as J. M. Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World, W. B. Yeats’s Calvary, Brendan Behan’s The Hostage, Samuel Beckett’s Endgame, Brian Friel’s Faith Healer and Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire, as well as of less well-known plays by Padraic Pearse, Lady Gregory, G. B. Shaw, Seán O’Casey, Denis Johnston, Samuel Beckett and David Lloyd. Challenging revisionist readings of the rhetoric of “blood sacrifice” and martyrdom in the Irish Republican tradition, it argues that the Passion play is a powerful political genre which centres on the staged death of the (usually male) protagonist, and makes visible the usually invisible violence perpetrated both by colonial power and by the postcolonial state in the name of modernity.
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The Irish Theatre

The limited resources of money and material in this young and experimental Irish Theatre imposed a simplicity of acting and an economy in costumes and scenery that amplified the wealth of natural speech and theme .

Author: Joseph Holloway

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 244

View: 579

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Women and Embodied Mythmaking in Irish Theatre

2. 21 Letter to Austin Clarke, 18 August 1944, http://marydevenportoneill.org/1944–2/ [Accessed 10 August 2017]. 22 Walsh, Experimental Irish Theatre, p. 35. 23 'An Irishman's Diary', Irish Times, 14 October 1943, p. 3.

Author: Shonagh Hill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108618274

Category: Drama

Page:

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The rich legacy of women's contributions to Irish theatre is traditionally viewed through a male-dominated literary canon and mythmaking, thus arguably silencing their work. In this timely book, Shonagh Hill proposes a feminist genealogy which brings new perspectives to women's mythmaking across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The performances considered include the tableaux vivants performed by the Inghinidhe na hÉireann (Daughters of Ireland), plays written by Alice Milligan, Maud Gonne, Lady Augusta Gregory, Eva Gore-Booth, Mary Devenport O'Neill, Mary Elizabeth Burke-Kennedy, Paula Meehan, Edna O'Brien and Marina Carr, as well as plays translated, adapted and performed by Olwen Fouéré. The theatrical work discussed resists the occlusion of women's cultural engagement that results from confinement to idealised myths of femininity. This is realised through embodied mythmaking: a process which exposes how bodies bear the consequences of these myths, while refusing to accept the female body as passive bearer of inscription through the assertion of a creative female corporeality.
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Irish Theatre in Transition

Again, Tom Mac lntyre, longone ofthe most experimental figures in Irishtheatre, refigured the myth asa political narrativein his experimental play Rise Up, Lovely Sweeney (1985). The original text, Buile Suibhne or 'The Madness of ...

Author: D. Morse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137450692

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 265

View: 644

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The Irish Theatre in Transition explores the ever-changing Irish Theatre from its inception to its vibrant modern-day reality. This book shows some of the myriad forms of transition and how Irish theatre reflects the changing conditions of a changing society and nation.
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Irish Drama and Theatre Since 1950

Sweeney, Bernadette (2008), Performing the Body in Irish Theatre, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Swift, Carolyn (1985), Stage by Stage, Dublin: Poolbeg. ... Walsh, Ian R. (2012), Experimental Irish Theatre After W.B. Yeats ...

Author: Patrick Lonergan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474262675

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 792

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Drawing on major new archival discoveries and recent research, Patrick Lonergan presents an innovative account of Irish drama and theatre, spanning the past seventy years. Rather than offering a linear narrative, the volume traces key themes to illustrate the relationship between theatre and changes in society. In considering internationalization, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, the Celtic Tiger period, feminism, and the changing status of the Catholic Church in Ireland, Lonergan asserts the power of theatre to act as an agent of change and uncovers the contribution of individual artists, plays and productions in challenging societal norms. Irish Drama and Theatre since 1950 provides a wide-ranging account of major developments, combined with case studies of the premiere or revival of major plays, the establishment of new companies and the influence of international work and artists, including Tennessee Williams, Chekhov and Brecht. While bringing to the fore some of the untold stories and overlooked playwrights following the declaration of the Irish Republic, Lonergan weaves into his account the many Irish theatre-makers who have achieved international prominence in the period: Samuel Beckett, Siobhán McKenna and Brendan Behan in the 1950s, continuing with Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, and concluding with the playwrights who emerged in the late 1990s, including Martin McDonagh, Enda Walsh, Conor McPherson, Marie Jones and Marina Carr. The contribution of major Irish companies to world theatre is also examined, including both the Abbey and Gate theatres, as well as Druid, Field Day and Charabanc. Through its engaging analysis of seventy years of Irish theatre, this volume charts the acts of gradual but revolutionary change that are the story of Irish theatre and drama and of its social and cultural contexts.
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Fifty Key Irish Plays

irlandaises, and contributed chapters to The Gate Theatre, Dublin: Inspiration and Craft (Carysfort/Peter Lang, ... His books include Experimental Irish Theatre: After W.B. Yeats (Palgrave, 2012); The Theatre of Enda Walsh (Carysfort, ...

Author: Shaun Richards

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000631272

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 211

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Fifty Key Irish Plays charts the progression of modern Irish drama from Dion Boucicault’s entry on to the global stage of the Irish diaspora to the contemporary dramas created by the experiences of the New Irish. Each chapter provides a brief plot outline along with informed analysis and, alert to the cultural and critical context of each play, an account of the key roles that they played in the developing story of Irish drama. While the core of the collection is based on the critical canon, including work by J. M. Synge, Lady Gregory, Teresa Deevy, and Brian Friel, plays such as Tom Mac Intyre’s The Great Hunger and ANU Productions’ Laundry, which illuminate routes away from the mainstream, are also included. With a focus on the development of form as well as theme, the collection guides the reader to an informed overview of Irish theatre via succinct and insightful essays by an international team of academics. This invaluable collection will be of particular interest to undergraduate students of theatre and performance studies and to lay readers looking to expand their appreciation of Irish drama.
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