For Race and Country

17. Frank N. Schubert , On the Trail of the. 36 For Race and Country.

Author: David P. Kilroy

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0275980057

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 183

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The story of the highest-ranking African American officer in the U.S. Army at the turn of the 20th century.
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For Home Country and Race

A demonstration of how a specific ideal of national heritage was consciously nurtured by England's elementary school system at the turn of the century.

Author: Stephen J. Heathorn

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802044360

Category: Education

Page: 300

View: 745

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A demonstration of how a specific ideal of national heritage was consciously nurtured by England's elementary school system at the turn of the century. Implicit within this ideal was an ideology that reinforced gender, class, and race distinctions.
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Policing Race and Place in Indian Country

Policing Race and Place in Indian Country is the first book to explore Native Americans' perspectives on the way law enforcement operates in Indian Country.

Author: Barbara Perry

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739116134

Category: Social Science

Page: 117

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Policing Race and Place in Indian Country is the first book to explore Native Americans' perspectives on the way law enforcement operates in Indian Country. In particular, it addresses the ways in which Native American communities--expecially those in and around reservations--are both over-and underpoliced in ways that perpetuate both the criminalization and victimization of Native Americans as nations and as individuals.
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Country Soul

Yet the music emerged from the same songwriters, musicians, and producers in the recording studios of Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama--what Charles L. Hughes calls the "country-soul triangle.

Author: Charles L. Hughes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469622446

Category: Music

Page: 280

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In the sound of the 1960s and 1970s, nothing symbolized the rift between black and white America better than the seemingly divided genres of country and soul. Yet the music emerged from the same songwriters, musicians, and producers in the recording studios of Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama--what Charles L. Hughes calls the "country-soul triangle." In legendary studios like Stax and FAME, integrated groups of musicians like Booker T. and the MGs and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section produced music that both challenged and reconfirmed racial divisions in the United States. Working with artists from Aretha Franklin to Willie Nelson, these musicians became crucial contributors to the era's popular music and internationally recognized symbols of American racial politics in the turbulent years of civil rights protests, Black Power, and white backlash. Hughes offers a provocative reinterpretation of this key moment in American popular music and challenges the conventional wisdom about the racial politics of southern studios and the music that emerged from them. Drawing on interviews and rarely used archives, Hughes brings to life the daily world of session musicians, producers, and songwriters at the heart of the country and soul scenes. In doing so, he shows how the country-soul triangle gave birth to new ways of thinking about music, race, labor, and the South in this pivotal period.
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Growing Up with the Country

The masterful and poignant story of three African-American families who journeyed west after emancipation, by an award-winning scholar and descendant of the migrants Following the lead of her own ancestors, Kendra Field's epic family ...

Author: Kendra Taira Field

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300180527

Category: History

Page: 225

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The masterful and poignant story of three African-American families who journeyed west after emancipation, by an award-winning scholar and descendant of the migrants Following the lead of her own ancestors, Kendra Field's epic family history chronicles the westward migration of freedom's first generation in the fifty years after emancipation. Drawing on decades of archival research and family lore within and beyond the United States, Field traces their journey out of the South to Indian Territory, where they participated in the development of black and black Indian towns and settlements. When statehood, oil speculation, and Jim Crow segregation imperiled their lives and livelihoods, these formerly enslaved men and women again chose emigration. Some migrants launched a powerful back-to-Africa movement, while others moved on to Canada and Mexico. Their lives and choices deepen and widen the roots of the Great Migration. Interweaving black, white, and Indian histories, Field's beautifully wrought narrative explores how ideas about race and color powerfully shaped the pursuit of freedom.
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Black is a Country

Explains why--despite being viewed by many as dangerous and separatist--the passionate skepticism of race radicals about the limits of U.S. social, political, and civil equality is important to deconstruction of racial inequality, which, in ...

Author: Nikhil Pal Singh

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015060056614

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 819

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Explains why--despite being viewed by many as dangerous and separatist--the passionate skepticism of race radicals about the limits of U.S. social, political, and civil equality is important to deconstruction of racial inequality, which, in spite of black gains in America, still exists.
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To Serve My Country to Serve My Race

Despite all the bad things that happened in the country , this was our home . ... Born from political struggles for racial equality , the 6888th represented ...

Author: Brenda L. Moore

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814755879

Category: History

Page: 288

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I would have climbed up a mountain to get on the list [to serve overseas]. We were going to do our duty. Despite all the bad things that happened, America was our home. This is where I was born. It was where my mother and father were. There was a feeling of wanting to do your part. --Gladys Carter, member of the 6888th To Serve My Country, to Serve my Race is the story of the historic 6888th, the first United States Women's Army Corps unit composed of African-American women to serve overseas. While African-American men and white women were invited, if belatedly, to serve their country abroad, African-American women were excluded for overseas duty throughout most of WWII. Under political pressure from legislators like Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., the NAACP, the black press, and even President Roosevelt, the U.S. War Department was forced to deploy African-American women to the European theater in 1945. African-American women, having succeeded, through their own activism and political ties, in their quest to shape their own lives, answered the call from all over the country, from every socioeconomic stratum. Stationed in France and England at the end of World War II, the 6888th brought together women like Mary Daniel Williams, a cook in the 6888th who signed up for the Army to escape the slums of Cleveland and to improve her ninth-grade education, and Margaret Barnes Jones, a public relations officer of the 6888th, who grew up in a comfortable household with a politically active mother who encouraged her to challenge the system. Despite the social, political, and economic restrictions imposed upon these African-American women in their own country, they were eager to serve, not only out of patriotism but out of a desire to uplift their race and dispell bigoted preconceptions about their abilities. Elaine Bennett, a First Sergeant in the 6888th, joined because "I wanted to prove to myself and maybe to the world that we would give what we had back to the United States as a confirmation that we were full- fledged citizens." Filled with compelling personal testimony based on extensive interviews, To Serve My Country is the first book to document the lives of these courageous pioneers. It reveals how their Army experience affected them for the rest of their lives and how they, in turn, transformed the U.S. military forever.
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Race Relations in Alan Paton s Cry the Beloved Country

Presents essays that examine race relations in "Cry, the Beloved Country," discussing such topics as whether the book is hopeful, the breakdown of tribal order, and the current condition of South Africa.

Author: Dedria Bryfonski

Publisher: Greenhaven Press, Incorporated

ISBN: 0737743964

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 194

View: 352

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Presents essays that examine race relations in "Cry, the Beloved Country," discussing such topics as whether the book is hopeful, the breakdown of tribal order, and the current condition of South Africa.
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Documents

minimize or eliminate discrimination based on race or color, religion or country of ancestral origin. 11. Reports. From time to time, but not less than once ...

Author: Maine. Legislature

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B2945291

Category:

Page:

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White Like Me

Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise examines what it really means to be white in a nation created to benefit people who are “white like him.” This inherent racism is not only real, but disproportionately burdens people of color ...

Author: Tim Wise

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 9781593764708

Category: Self-Help

Page: 208

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From “one of the most brilliant, articulate and courageous critics of white privilege in the nation” (Michael Eric Dyson), this now-classic is “a brilliant and personal deconstruction of institutionalized white supremacy in the United States . . . a beautifully written, heartfelt memoir” (Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz). The inspiration for the acclaimed documentary film, this deeply personal polemic reveals how racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise examines what it really means to be white in a nation created to benefit people who are “white like him.” This inherent racism is not only real, but disproportionately burdens people of color and makes progressive social change less likely to occur. Explaining in clear and convincing language why it is in everyone’s best interest to fight racial inequality, Wise offers ways in which white people can challenge these unjust privileges, resist white supremacy and racism, and ultimately help to ensure the country’s personal and collective well-being.
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Country Life

Perhaps the most awaited decisions are the position of Ashley House in the handicap, and whether it is to be trained for the race or not.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:30000088358001

Category: Country life

Page:

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