Franklin D Roosevelt s Rhetorical Presidency

Ryan examines the mechanics of a typical Roosevelt speech, considering such factors as intonation, rhythm, and choice of metaphor, as well as Roosevelt's incomparable body language--these are the best parts of the book.

Author: Halford Ross Ryan

Publisher: Praeger

ISBN: UOM:39015012413871

Category: Political Science

Page: 206

View: 132

Download →

Building on the premise that the 20th century has witnessed the rise of the `rhetorical presidency, ' Ryan parses the public addresses of a master persuader. Overall, FDR's verbal gifts strengthened his hand while enriching the language of American politics. Ryan examines the mechanics of a typical Roosevelt speech, considering such factors as intonation, rhythm, and choice of metaphor, as well as Roosevelt's incomparable body language--these are the best parts of the book. Ryan effectively treats the question of authorship, arguing that although FDR wrote little of his own material, his speeches bore a distinct Roosevelt imprint. . . . Ryan's work makes clear why the packaging of a speech must be considered as significant as its substance. Choice This thought-provoking study makes a unique contribution to the literature on Franklin D. Roosevelt by focusing on his presidential rhetoric. Unlike previous works on Roosevelt, this volume demonstrates how he tried to persuade the public and the Congress, what rhetorical techniques he used, how he attempted to manage the reception of his messages through the press and the media, and what the effect was of his oratorical endeavors. It examines his leading orations on national and international issues, his persuasive campaign strategies and tactics, his four inaugural addresses, and his unsuccessful speeches against the Supreme Court and in the Purge. It further demonstrates how contemporary Americans responded to and received Roosevelt's rhetoric.
Posted in:

Presidents in Culture

In this book, David Michael Ryfe argues that although presidential rhetoric has many meanings, one of the most important is how it rhetorically constructs the practice of presidential communication itself.

Author: David Ryfe

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 0820474568

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 663

Download →

Whether writing from the perspective of rhetoric or political science, scholars of presidential communication often assume that the ultimate meaning of presidential rhetoric lies in whether it achieves policy success. In this book, David Michael Ryfe argues that although presidential rhetoric has many meanings, one of the most important is how it rhetorically constructs the practice of presidential communication itself. Drawing upon an examination of presidential rhetoric in the twentieth century - from Theodore Roosevelt to Franklin D. Roosevelt, from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton - Ryfe surveys the shifting meaning of presidential communication. In doing so, he reveals that the so-called public or rhetorical presidency is not one fixed entity, but rather a continuously negotiated discursive construct.
Posted in:

The Good Neighbor

Using the metaphor of the good neighbor, Mary E. Stuckey examines the persuasive work that took place to authorize these changes.

Author: Mary E. Stuckey

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 9781628951653

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 312

View: 128

Download →

No modern president has had as much influence on American national politics as Franklin D. Roosevelt. During FDR’s administration, power shifted from states and localities to the federal government; within the federal government it shifted from Congress to the president; and internationally, it moved from Europe to the United States. All of these changes required significant effort on the part of the president, who triumphed over fierce opposition and succeeded in remaking the American political system in ways that continue to shape our politics today. Using the metaphor of the good neighbor, Mary E. Stuckey examines the persuasive work that took place to authorize these changes. Through the metaphor, FDR’s administration can be better understood: his emphasis on communal values; the importance of national mobilization in domestic as well as foreign affairs in defense of those values; his use of what he considered a particularly democratic approach to public communication; his treatment of friends and his delineation of enemies; and finally, the ways in which he used this rhetoric to broaden his neighborhood from the limits of the United States to encompass the entire world, laying the groundwork for American ideological dominance in the post–World War II era.
Posted in:

Presidential Speechwriting

Yet, as this volume of expert analyses graphically demonstrates, the reliance of individual presidents on their speechwriters has varied with the rhetorical skill of the officeholder himself, his managerial style, and his personal attitude ...

Author: Kurt Ritter

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1585443921

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 809

Download →

The rise of the media presidency through radio and television broadcasts has heightened the visibility and importance of presidential speeches in determining the effectiveness and popularity of the President of the United States. Not surprisingly, this development has also witnessed the rise of professional speechwriters to craft the words the chief executive would address to the nation. Yet, as this volume of expert analyses graphically demonstrates, the reliance of individual presidents on their speechwriters has varied with the rhetorical skill of the officeholder himself, his managerial style, and his personal attitude toward public speaking. The individual chapters here (two by former White House speechwriters) give fascinating insight into the process and development of presidential speechwriting from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration to Ronald Reagan’s. Some contributors, such as Charles Griffin writing on Eisenhower and Moya Ball on Johnson, offer case studies of specific speeches to gain insight into those presidents. Other chapters focus on institutional arrangements and personal relationships, rhetorical themes characterizing an administration, or the relationship between words and policies to shed light on presidential speechwriting. The range of presidents covered affords opportunities to examine various factors that make rhetoric successful or not, to study alternative organizational arrangements for speechwriters, and even to consider the evolution of the rhetorical presidency itself. Yet, the volume’s single focus on speechwriting and the analytic overviews provided by Martin J. Medhurst not only bring coherence to the work, but also make this book an exemplar of how unity can be achieved from a diversity of approaches. Medhurst’s introduction of ten “myths” in the scholarship on presidential speeches and his summary of the enduring issues in the practice of speechwriting pull together the work of individual contributors. At the same time, his introduction and conclusion transcend particular presidents by providing generalizations on the role of speechwriting in the modern White House.
Posted in:

The Inaugural Addresses of Twentieth century American Presidents

The essays in Ryan's work explore how presidents have used their addresses to empower themselves in office.

Author: Halford Ross Ryan

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780275940393

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 324

View: 606

Download →

These essays explore how presidents have used their addresses to empower themselves in office. Since scholars agree that the rhetorical presidency arose in the 20th century with Theodore Roosevelt, the book commences with Roosevelt's address, followed by all subsequent presidents' inaugurals.
Posted in:

The Meaning of Presidential Communication

In this book, Mark Crosby argues that although presidential rhetoric has many meanings, one of the most important is how it rhetorically constructs the practice of presidential communication itself.

Author: Mark Crosby

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1981936246

Category:

Page: 266

View: 342

Download →

In this book, Mark Crosby argues that although presidential rhetoric has many meanings, one of the most important is how it rhetorically constructs the practice of presidential communication itself. Drawing upon an examination of presidential rhetoric in the twentieth century - from Theodore Roosevelt to Franklin D. Roosevelt, from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton Mark Crosby surveys the shifting meaning of presidential communication. In doing so, he reveals that the so-called public or rhetorical presidency is not one fixed entity, but rather a continuously negotiated discursive construct.
Posted in:

U S Presidents as Orators

First systematic critique of the rhetoric of 21 presidents focusing on the nexus of oratory and politics.

Author: Halford Ross Ryan

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313290598

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 390

View: 469

Download →

First systematic critique of the rhetoric of 21 presidents focusing on the nexus of oratory and politics.
Posted in:

Political Rhetoric

This briefing book offers a succinct reflection on the ways in which historical developments have encouraged the use of political rhetoric.

Author: Mary E. Stuckey

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412856317

Category: Political Science

Page: 125

View: 466

Download →

Rhetoric is among the most important and least understood elements of presidential leadership. Presidents have always wielded rhetoric as one tool of governance—and that rhetoric was always intended to facilitate political ends, such as image building, persuasion of the mass public, and inter-branch government persuasion. But as mass media has grown and then fragmented, as the federal bureaucracy has continued to both expand and calcify, and as partisanship has heightened tensions both within Congress and between Congress and the Executive, rhetoric is an increasingly important element of presidential governance. Scholars have derived ways to explain how these developments and the presidents’ use of rhetoric have contributed to and detracted from the health of American democracy. This briefing book offers a succinct reflection on the ways in which historical developments have encouraged the use of political rhetoric. It explores strategies of “going public” to provide some leverage over the political system and the lessons one might derive from these choices. This essential analysis, written for lay readers, scholars, students, and future presidents, is the first in Transaction’s innovative Presidential Briefings series. Mary E. Stuckey covers the scholarly literature with authority and offers examples of rhetoric that have lasting influence.
Posted in:

Harry S Truman

Harry Truman is famous for his plain speaking, and his presidential rhetoric is evaluated in terms of his most important speeches relating to the Cold War, Korean War, and whistle-stop campaigning to win a remarkable election victory, and ...

Author: Halford Ross Ryan

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: UOM:39015026941768

Category: Political Science

Page: 213

View: 884

Download →

Harry Truman is famous for his plain speaking, and his presidential rhetoric is evaluated in terms of his most important speeches relating to the Cold War, Korean War, and whistle-stop campaigning to win a remarkable election victory, and his summation of his presidential role. This in-depth analysis of his major speeches as president, texts, chronology, and bibliography give insights into presidential rhetoric and communications research.
Posted in:

Presidential Rhetorical Crisis Leadership

Critical description, interpretation, and evaluation of the speeches were examined from a dramaturgical perspective.

Author: Stormy T. W. Hicks

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:828105910

Category:

Page: 201

View: 265

Download →

Critical description, interpretation, and evaluation of the speeches were examined from a dramaturgical perspective. Contingency and genre theory ground the overall project. Concepts of symbolic convergence theory (with particular emphasis on fantasy theme analysis), sensemaking, and framing were fundamental to the analytical process.
Posted in: