Frontier Regulars

Details the U.S. Army's campaign in the years following the Civil War to contain the American Indian and promote Western expansion This book combines scholarship and drama to produce an impressive history of the final, massive drive by the ...

Author: Robert Marshall Utley

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803295510

Category: History

Page: 462

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Details the U.S. Army's campaign in the years following the Civil War to contain the American Indian and promote Western expansion
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Frontier Regulars

The United States Army and the Indian, 1866-1890.

Author: Robert Marshall Utley

Publisher: New York : Macmillan

ISBN: LCCN:73002326

Category: Frontier and pioneer life

Page: 462

View: 226

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The United States Army and the Indian, 1866-1890.
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Army Regulars on the Western Frontier 1848 1861

Unlike previous histories, this book argues that the politics of slavery profoundly influenced the western mission of the regular army - affecting the hearts and minds of officers and enlisted men both as the nation plummented toward civil ...

Author: Durwood Ball

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806133120

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 716

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Unlike previous histories, this book argues that the politics of slavery profoundly influenced the western mission of the regular army - affecting the hearts and minds of officers and enlisted men both as the nation plummented toward civil war."--BOOK JACKET.
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Frontiersmen in Blue

Frontiersmen in Blue is a comprehensive history of the achievements and failures of the United States Regular and Volunteer Armies that confronted the Indian tribes of the West in the two decades between the Mexican War and the close of the ...

Author: Robert Marshall Utley

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803295502

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 404

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Frontiersmen in Blue is a comprehensive history of the achievements and failures of the United States Regular and Volunteer Armies that confronted the Indian tribes of the West in the two decades between the Mexican War and the close of the Civil War. Between 1848 and 1865 the men in blue fought nearly all of the western tribes. Robert Utley describes many of these skirmishes in consummate detail, including descriptions of garrison life that was sometimes agonizingly isolated, sometimes caught in the lightning moments of desperate battle.
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The Regulars

He weaves their stories, and those of others he has interviewed, into the story of an army which grew from a small community of posts in China and the Philippines to a highly effective mechanized ground and air force.

Author: Edward M. Coffman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674029620

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 464

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In 1898 the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers. Forty-three years later, in 1941, it was a large modern army ready to wage global war against the Germans and the Japanese. In this definitive social history of America's standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical transformation was accomplished. Coffman has spent years immersed in the official records, personal papers, memoirs, and biographies of regular army men, including such famous leaders as George Marshall, George Patton, and Douglas MacArthur. He weaves their stories, and those of others he has interviewed, into the story of an army which grew from a small community of posts in China and the Philippines to a highly effective mechanized ground and air force. During these years, the U.S. Army conquered and controlled a colonial empire, military staff lived in exotic locales with their families, and soldiers engaged in combat in Cuba and the Pacific. In the twentieth century, the United States entered into alliances to fight the German army in World War I, and then again to meet the challenge of the Axis Powers in World War II. Coffman explains how a managerial revolution in the early 1900s provided the organizational framework and educational foundation for change, and how the combination of inspired leadership, technological advances, and a supportive society made it successful. In a stirring account of all aspects of garrison life, including race relations, we meet the men and women who helped reconfigure America's frontier army into a modern global force.
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Regular Army O

What induced these men to enlist for five years and to embrace the grim prospect of combat is one of the enduring questions this book explores.

Author: Douglas C. McChristian

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806159034

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 123

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“The drums they roll, upon my soul, for that’s the way we go,” runs the chorus in a Harrigan and Hart song from 1874. “Forty miles a day on beans and hay in the Regular Army O!” The last three words of that lyric aptly title Douglas C. McChristian’s remarkable work capturing the lot of soldiers posted to the West after the Civil War. At once panoramic and intimate, Regular Army O! uses the testimony of enlisted soldiers—drawn from more than 350 diaries, letters, and memoirs—to create a vivid picture of life in an evolving army on the western frontier. After the volunteer troops that had garrisoned western forts and camps during the Civil War were withdrawn in 1865, the regular army replaced them. In actions involving American Indians between 1866 and 1891, 875 of these soldiers were killed, mainly in minor skirmishes, while many more died of disease, accident, or effects of the natural environment. What induced these men to enlist for five years and to embrace the grim prospect of combat is one of the enduring questions this book explores. Going well beyond Don Rickey Jr.’s classic work Forty Miles a Day on Beans and Hay (1963), McChristian plumbs the regulars’ accounts for frank descriptions of their training to be soldiers; their daily routines, including what they ate, how they kept clean, and what they did for amusement; the reasons a disproportionate number occasionally deserted, while black soldiers did so only rarely; how the men prepared for field service; and how the majority who survived mustered out. In this richly drawn, uniquely authentic view, men black and white, veteran and tenderfoot, fill in the details of the frontier soldier’s experience, giving voice to history in the making.
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The American Military Frontiers

Integrating the work of other military historians as well as tapping into a broad array of primary materials, Wooster offers a multifaceted narrative that will shape our understanding of the frontier military experience, its relationship ...

Author: Robert Wooster

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826338457

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 363

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As the fledgling nation looked west to the land beyond the Appalachian Mountains, it turned to the army to advance and defend its national interests. Clashing with Spain, Britain, France, Mexico, the Confederacy, and Indians in this pursuit of expansion, the army's failures and successes alternately delayed and hastened western migration. Roads, river improvements, and railroads, often constructed or facilitated by the army, further solidified the nation's presence as it reached the Pacific Ocean and expanded north and south to the borders of Canada and Mexico. Western military experiences thus illustrate the dual role played by the United States Army in insuring national security and fostering national development. Robert Wooster's study examines the fundamental importance of military affairs to social, economic, and political life throughout the borderlands and western frontiers. Integrating the work of other military historians as well as tapping into a broad array of primary materials, Wooster offers a multifaceted narrative that will shape our understanding of the frontier military experience, its relationship with broader concerns of national politics, and its connection to major themes and events in American history.
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Class and Race in the Frontier Army

Utley, Frontier Regulars, 23. 1 1. Prucha noted this in Broadax and Bayonet more than half a century ago, but from the perspective of the early twenty-first century, this insight is marred by his reliance on a series of problematic ...

Author: Kevin Adams

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806185132

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 798

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Historians have long assumed that ethnic and racial divisions in post–Civil War America were reflected in the U.S. Army, of whose enlistees 40 percent were foreign-born. Now Kevin Adams shows that the frontier army was characterized by a “Victorian class divide” that overshadowed ethnic prejudices. Class and Race in the Frontier Army marks the first application of recent research on class, race, and ethnicity to the social and cultural history of military life on the western frontier. Adams draws on a wealth of military records and soldiers’ diaries and letters to reconstruct everyday army life—from work and leisure to consumption, intellectual pursuits, and political activity—and shows that an inflexible class barrier stood between officers and enlisted men. As Adams relates, officers lived in relative opulence while enlistees suffered poverty, neglect, and abuse. Although racism was ingrained in official policy and informal behavior, no similar prejudice colored the experience of soldiers who were immigrants. Officers and enlisted men paid much less attention to ethnic differences than to social class—officers flaunting and protecting their status, enlisted men seething with class resentment. Treating the army as a laboratory to better understand American society in the Gilded Age, Adams suggests that military attitudes mirrored civilian life in that era—with enlisted men, especially, illustrating the emerging class-consciousness among the working poor. Class and Race in the Frontier Army offers fresh insight into the interplay of class, race, and ethnicity in late-nineteenth-century America.
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Billy the Kid

Examines the career of the young outlaw whose life and death were an expression of the violence prevalent on the American frontier.

Author: Robert M. Utley

Publisher: Bison Books

ISBN: 0803295669

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 517

View: 995

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Examines the career of the young outlaw whose life and death were an expression of the violence prevalent on the American frontier.
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Cathy Williams

American Conquest, 1846–1861 (Chicago: NelsonHall, 1979), 57–59; Paul Horgan, Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History (Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1984), 61, 220; Utley, Frontier Regulars, 379; Armstrong, ...

Author: Philip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811749633

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 163

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Women in the United States military have received more recognition than ever in recent years, but women also played vital roles in battles and campaigns of previous generations. Cathy Williams served as Pvt. William Cathay from 1866 to 1868 with the famed Buffalo Soldiers who patrolled the 900-mile Santa Fe Trail. Tucker traces her life from her birth as a slave near Independence, Missouri, to her service in Company A, 38th U.S. Infantry, one of the six black units formed following the Civil War. Cathy Williams remains the only known African American woman to have served as a Buffalo Soldier in the Indian Wars. Her remarkable story continues to represent a triumph of the human spirit.
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General Crook and the Western Frontier

1 : 56 , 59-60 ; Strobridge , Regulars in the Redwoods , 120–21 . 34. Abbot , Report , pt . 1 : 60–62 ; Strobridge , Regulars in the Redwoods , 121 ; Schmitt , General George Crook , 22 . 35. Abbot , Report , pt .

Author: Charles M. Robinson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806133589

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 386

View: 135

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General George Crook was one of the most prominent soldiers in the frontier West. General William T. Sherman called him the greatest Indian fighter and manager the army ever had. General Crook and the Western Frontier, the first full-scale biography of Crook, uses contemporary manuscripts and primary sources to illuminate the general's personal life and military career.
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Frontier Cavalry Trooper

During his five years in the army, Private Edward L. Matthews wrote a series of exceptionally detailed and engaging letters to his family back home in Maryland describing his life in the Arizona and New Mexico Territories.

Author: Douglas C. McChristian

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826352286

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 980

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During his five years in the army, Private Edward L. Matthews wrote a series of exceptionally detailed and engaging letters to his family back home in Maryland describing his life in the Arizona and New Mexico Territories. Eddie Matthews’s letters, published here for the first time, provide an unparalleled chronicle of one soldier’s experiences in garrison and in the field in the post–Civil War Southwest. Eddie’s letters record a vivid chronicle of day-to-day life in the frontier regulars. Included are operational details in his company, candid observations of people and places, intimate views of frontier society, and personal opinions that probably would have been forgotten or moderated had he recorded his experiences later in life. More subtle are his valuable references to the state of transportation and communication in the Southwest during the early 1870s. Matthews probably did not realize until later years that he was not only a witness to the nation’s rapid westward expansion, but was himself a tiny cog in the machinery that made it possible.
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The Indian Frontier 1846 1890

For the military side , see Utley , Frontier Regulars , chaps . 14-15 , and Cavalier in Buckskin : George Armstrong Custer and the Western Military Frontier ( Norman , Okla . , 1988 ; rev . ed . 2001 ) ; John S. Gray , Centennial ...

Author: Robert M. Utley

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826329985

Category: History

Page: 325

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First published in 1984, Robert Utley's The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890, is considered a classic for both students and scholars. For this revision, Utley includes scholarship and research that has become available in recent years. What they said about the first edition: "[The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890]provides an excellent synthesis of Indian-white relations in the trans-Mississippi West during the last half-century of the frontier period."--Journal of American History "The Indian Frontier of the American Westcombines good writing, solid research, and penetrating interpretations. The result is a fresh and welcome study that departs from the soldier-chases-Indian approach that is all too typical of other books on the topic."--Minnesota History "[Robert M. Utley] has carefully eschewed sensationalism and glib oversimplification in favor of critical appraisal, and his firm command of some of the best published research of others provides a solid foundation for his basic argument that Indian hostility in the half century following the Mexican War was directed less at the white man per se than at the hated reservation system itself."--Pacific Historical Review Choice MagazineOutstanding Selection
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Captain Charles Rawn and the Frontier Infantry in Montana

Utley, Frontier Regulars, 12. 7. Ibid., 13. 8. Ibid., 14. 9. Ibid., 22. 10. Ibid., 14–15. 11. Ibid., 15–16. 12. Smith, Dose of Frontier Soldiering, 62. 13. Utley, Frontier Regulars, 20–25. 14. Ibid., 36–49. 15. McChristian, U.S. Army in ...

Author: Robert M. Brown PhD

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625855213

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 958

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Stationed in Montana during the height of the Indian Wars, Captain Charles Rawn proved an unlikely hero and an indispensable leader in numerous battles. He took command from a drunken Major Baker at the Battle of Pryor's Creek, saving the 400 soldiers from possible annihilation at the hands of 1,000 Sioux. As commander of Fort Missoula, he led 35 soldiers and 200 volunteers in an attempt to halt 850 Nez Perce warriors. When Colonel Gibbon suffered an injury at the Battle of the Big Hole, Rawn's experience and leadership of the 7th Infantry helped prevent another Custer debacle. Author Robert M. Brown catalogues the career of this outstanding officer and the transformation of the frontier army from a Civil War legacy into an elite fighting force.
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Daily Life on the Nineteenth Century American Frontier

To the astonishment of their men , the two colonels verbally accosted one another when Grierson went to the defense of his troops ( Utley , Frontier Regulars 27 ) . As long as the Tenth was stationed at Leavenworth , Hoffman remained ...

Author: Mary Ellen Jones

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313296340

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 753

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This comprehensive social history of the westward movement explores the details of everyday living on the American frontier.
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Life in Custer s Cavalry

They have left a record of frontier military life that can scarcely be matched elsewhere. . . . Historian and buff alike will find this volume both enlightening and entertaining.

Author: Albert Barnitz

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803295537

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 302

View: 764

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Albert and Jennie Barnitz "were both perceptive, articulate individuals who fully realized that they were involved in fascinating historically important events. They have left a record of frontier military life that can scarcely be matched elsewhere. . . . Historian and buff alike will find this volume both enlightening and entertaining."--Paul A. Hutton, Journal of American History "The reader will come to like Albert and Jennie Barnitz, whose letters trigger a time machine in which we come to know a good deal more about Life in Custer's Cavalry."--Montana "Albert Barnitz. . .served with Custer's famed Seventh Cavalry for four years, 1867-70. . . . In 1867 Albert and Jennie (Platt), both of Ohio, married and headed for the Kansas frontier. Four months later the growing perils of Indian clashes forced her to return east. . . . [Their] letters and diaries, dated from January 17, 1867, to February 10, 1869, are vivid and accurate. . . . [They] provide a keen picture of life in the Seventh Cavalry, both in garrison and field, immediately after the Civil War."--The Historian Editor Robert Utley's books available in Bison Books editions include Billy the Kid: A Short and Violent Life; Frontier Regulars: The United States Army and the Indian, 1866-1891; and Frontiersmen in Blue: The United States Army and the Indian, 1848-1865.
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Frontier Cavalry Trooper

He was clearly embarrassed to be seen in uniform because regular soldiers were widely thought of as shiftless and too ... populace, his service to his country barely noticed and soon forgotten.28 27 See Utley, Frontier Regulars, 212433.

Author: William Edward Matthews

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826352262

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 805

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"A collection of letters that Private Edward L. Matthews wrote from 1869 to 1874 to his family back home in Massachusetts, detailing his life at Fort Bascom and Fort Union, New Mexico Territory. Matthews's letters provide detailed insight into the daily life of the enlisted man and how he felt about the job he was doing"--Provided by publisher.
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