Gender and Communication in Euripides Plays

This book shows how aspects of womena (TM)s communicationa "song, silence and secret-keeping as female verbal genres, and the challenges of speaking out of placea "constitute a decisive factor in Euripidesa (TM) portrayal of gender.

Author: James Harvey Kim On Chong-Gossard

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004168800

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 263

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In Greek tragedy, women constantly struggle to control language. This book shows how aspects of womena (TM)s communicationa "song, silence and secret-keeping as female verbal genres, and the challenges of speaking out of placea "constitute a decisive factor in Euripidesa (TM) portrayal of gender.
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Euripides Suppliant Women

... and of the theme of gender in the play] L.H.G. Greenwood (Aspects) 92-120 [the most ... J.H. Kim On. Gender and Communication in Euripides'Plays, ...

Author: Ian C. Storey

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781472521156

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

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Euripides' "Suppliant Women" is an unfairly neglected master work by the most controversial of the three great tragedians of Ancient Greece. It dramatises the story of one of the proudest moments in Athenian mythical history: the intervention of Theseus in support of international law to force the burial of the Argives who were killed during their attack on Thebes. But Euripides adds new characters to the story and presents the myth in a different and sometimes ambiguous light. A sense of uncertainty and undercutting pervades this play, which dramatises the sufferings of the innocent in war and then at the end foretells more war. As well as presenting a scene-by-scene analysis, this book will discuss the date and background of the play, whether people and events from contemporary Athens can be glimpsed in the drama; the problems of staging, and finally the story in later tradition.
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Euripides

'Euripides' Medea and the vanity ofλόγοι', Classical Philology 86: 95–112. ... Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Silence and Song.

Author: Isabelle Torrance

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781786735386

Category: History

Page: 192

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Sophocles, Aeschylus and Euripides are often described as the greatest tragedians of the ancient world. Of these three pivotal founders of modern drama, Euripides is characterized as the interloper and the innovator: the man who put tragic verse into the mouths of slaves, women and the socially inferior in order to address vital social issues such as sex, class and gender relations. It is perhaps little wonder that his work should find such resonance in the modern day. In this concise introduction, Isabelle Torrance engages with the thematic, cultural and scholarly difficulties that surround his plays to demonstrate why Euripides remains a figure of perennial relevance. Addressing here issues of social context, performance theory, fifth-century philosophy and religion, textual criticism and reception, the author presents an astute and attractively-written guide to the Euripidean corpus – from the widely read and celebrated Medea to the lesser-known and deeply ambiguous Alcestis.
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Language and Character in Euripides Electra

Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and Silence. Leiden. Clark, H. H. and R. J. Gerrig. 1990. 'Quotations as Demonstrations' ...

Author: Evert van Emde Boas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198793601

Category:

Page: 336

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This study of Euripides' Electra approaches the text through the lens of modern linguistics, marrying it with traditional literary criticism in order to provide new and informative means of analyzing and interpreting what is considered to be one of the playwright's most controversial works. It is the first systematic attempt to apply a variety of modern linguistic theories, including conversation analysis, pragmatics, sociolinguistics (on gender and politeness), paroemiology, and discourse studies, to a single Greek tragedy. The volume focuses specifically on issues of characterization, demonstrating how Euripides shaped his figures through their use of language, while also using the same methodology to tackle some of the play's major textual issues. An introductory chapter treats each of the linguistic approaches used throughout the book, and discusses some of the general issues surrounding the play's interpretation. This is followed by chapters on the figures of the Peasant, Electra herself, and Orestes, in each case showing how their characterization is determined by their speaking style and their "linguistic behavior." Three further chapters focus on textual criticism in stichomythia, on the messenger speech, and on the agon. By using modern linguistic methodologies to argue for a balanced interpretation of the Electra's main characters, the volume both challenges dominant scholarly opinion and enhances the literary interpretation of this well-studied play. Taking full account of recent and older work in both linguistics and classics, it will be of use to readers and researchers in both fields, and includes translations of all Greek cited and a glossary of linguistic terminology to make the text accessible to both.
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Euripides Alexandros

CASALI, S. (1998): 'Ovid's Canace and Euripides' Aeolus: Two Notes on ... J.H.K.O. (2008): Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and ...

Author: Ioanna Karamanou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110537284

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 396

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This is the first full-scale commentary on Euripides’ Alexandros, which is one of the best preserved fragmentary tragedies. It yields insight into aspects of Euripidean style, ideology and dramatic technique (e.g. rhetoric, stagecraft and imagery) and addresses textual and philological matters, on the basis of a re-inspection of the papyrus fragments. This book offers a reconstruction of the play and an investigation of issues of characterization, staging, textual transmission and reception, not least because Alexandros has enjoyed a fascinating Nachleben in literary, dramaturgical and performative terms. It also contributes to the readers’ understanding of the trends of later Euripidean drama, especially the dramatist’s innovation and experimentation with plot-patterns and staging conventions. Furthermore, the analysis of Alexandros could stimulate a more comprehensive reading of the extant Trojan Women coming from the same production, which bears the features of a ‘connected trilogy’. Thus, the information retrieved through the interrogation of the rich fragmentary material serves to supplement and contextualize the extant tragic corpus, showcasing the vitality and multiformity of Euripidean drama as a whole.
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Euripides The Children of Heracles

Speech and gender in Athenian drama . Princeton . Padel , R. 1995. ... Gender and Communication in Euripides ' Plays . Leiden . Conacher , D. J. 1967.

Author: William Allan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781800346536

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

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The Children of Heracles is a powerful and challenging tragedy of exile and supplication. Driven from their homeland by Eurystheus, king of Argos, the children of Heracles flee as fugitives throughout Greece until they are granted protection in Athens.
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Euripides Iphigenia in Tauris

Spoken like a Woman Speech and gender in Athenian drama . Princeton . Padel , R. 1995. ... Gender and Communication in Euripides ' Plays . Leiden .

Author: M. J. Cropp

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781800346208

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

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Iphigenia in Tauris tells the story of the princess Iphigenia who was sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to expedite his campaign against Troy but was rescued by the goddess Artemis and transported to the land of the Taurians. There she herself must perform human sacrifices as a priestess of Artemis in the local cult.
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Euripides Ion

Gender and communication in Euripides' plays: between song and silence, Leiden Colardeau, T. 1916. “Ion à Delphes,” REG 29: 430–4 Cole, A.T. 1997.

Author: Euripides

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108627412

Category: History

Page:

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Ion is one of Euripides' most appealing and inventive plays. With its story of an anonymous temple slave discovered to be the son of Apollo and Creusa, an Athenian princess, it is a rare example of Athenian myth dramatized for the Athenian stage. It explores the Delphic Oracle and Greek piety; the Athenian ideology of autochthony and empire; and the tragic suffering and longing of the mythical foundling and his mother, whose experiences are represented uniquely in surviving Greek literature. The plot anticipates later Greek comedy, while the recognition scene builds on a tradition founded by Homer's Odyssey and Aeschylus' Oresteia. The introduction sets out the main issues in interpretation and discusses the play's contexts in myth, religion, law, politics, and society. By attending to language, style, meter, and dramatic technique, this edition with its detailed commentary makes Ion accessible to students, scholars, and readers of Greek at all levels.
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Euripides Ion

Gender and communication in Euripides' plays: between song and silence, Leiden Colardeau, T. 1916. “Ion à Delphes,” REG 29: 430–4 Cole, A.T. 1997.

Author:

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521593618

Category:

Page:

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Euripides and the Politics of Form

Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and Silence. Leiden: Brill. Cilliers, L. 1991. “Menelaus' 'Unnecessary Baseness of Character' in ...

Author: Victoria Wohl

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691202372

Category: Drama

Page: 224

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How can we make sense of the innovative structure of Euripidean drama? And what political role did tragedy play in the democracy of classical Athens? These questions are usually considered to be mutually exclusive, but this book shows that they can only be properly answered together. Providing a new approach to the aesthetics and politics of Greek tragedy, Victoria Wohl argues that the poetic form of Euripides' drama constitutes a mode of political thought. Through readings of select plays, she explores the politics of Euripides' radical aesthetics, showing how formal innovation generates political passions with real-world consequences. Euripides' plays have long perplexed readers. With their disjointed plots, comic touches, and frequent happy endings, they seem to stretch the boundaries of tragedy. But the plays' formal traits—from their exorbitantly beautiful lyrics to their arousal and resolution of suspense—shape the audience's political sensibilities and ideological attachments. Engendering civic passions, the plays enact as well as express political ideas. Wohl draws out the political implications of Euripidean aesthetics by exploring such topics as narrative and ideological desire, the politics of pathos, realism and its utopian possibilities, the logic of political allegory, and tragedy's relation to its historical moment. Breaking through the impasse between formalist and historicist interpretations of Greek tragedy, Euripides and the Politics of Form demonstrates that aesthetic structure and political meaning are mutually implicated—and that to read the plays poetically is necessarily to read them politically.
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The Structure and Performance of Euripides Helen

Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and Silence. Leiden and Boston. Clader, L. L. 1976. Helen: The Evolution from Divine to Heroic in ...

Author: C. W. Marshall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107073753

Category: Drama

Page: 336

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In his detailed study of Euripides' play, Helen, C. W. Marshall expands our understanding of Athenian tragedy and Classical performance.
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A Companion to Euripides

WORKS. CITED. Aichele, K. (1971), “Das Epeisodion”, in Jens, ed. ... Chong‐Gossard, J.H.K.O. (2008), Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays:Between ...

Author: Laura K. McClure

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119257509

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

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A Companion to Euripides is an up-to-date, centralized assessment of Euripides and his work, drawing from the most recently published texts, commentaries, and scholarship, and offering detailed discussions and provocative interpretations of his extant plays and fragments. The most contemporary scholarship on Euripides and his oeuvre, featuring the latest texts and commentaries Leading scholars in the field discuss all of Euripides’ plays and their afterlife with breadth and depth A dedicated section focuses on the reception of Euripidean drama since the Hellenistic Original and provocative interpretations of Euripides and his plays forge important paths of in future scholarship
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Wisdom and Folly in Euripides

Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, London. Buxton, R.G.A. (2003). 'Euripides' ... Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between.

Author: Poulheria Kyriakou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110452280

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 455

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A major, defining polarity in Euripidean drama, wisdom and folly, has never so far been the subject of a book-length study. The volume aims at filling this gap. Virtually all Euripidean characters, from gods to slaves, are subject to some aspect of folly and claim at least some measure of wisdom. The playwright’s sophisticated handling of the tradition and the pervasive ambiguity in his work add extra layers of complexity. Wisdom and folly become inextricably intertwined, as gods pursue their agendas and mortal characters struggle to control their destiny, deal with their troubles, confront their past, and chart their future. Their amoral or immoral behavior and various limitations often affect also their families and communities. Leading international scholars discuss wisdom and folly from various thematic angles and theoretical perspectives. A final section deals with the polarity’s reception in vase-painting and literature. The result is a wealth of fresh insights into moral, social and historical issues. The volume is of interest to students and scholars of classical drama and its reception, of philosophy, and of rhetoric
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Euripides Children of Heracles

Chong-Gossard, J.H.K.O. (2008), Gender and communication in Euripides' plays, Leiden: Brill. Clément, J.M.B. and de Laporte J. (1775), Anecdotes dramatiques ...

Author: Florence Yoon

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350076778

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

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This book is an accessible guide through the many twists and turns of Euripides' Children of Heracles, providing several frameworks through which to understand and appreciate the play. Children of Heracles follows the fortunes of Heracles' family after his death. Euripides confronts characters and audience alike with an extraordinary series of plot twists and ethical challenges as the persecuted family of refugees struggles to find asylum in Athens before taking revenge on its enemy Eurystheus. It is a fast-paced story that explores the nature of power and its abuse, focusing on the appropriate treatment and behaviour of the powerless and the obligations and limitations of asylum. The audience must continually re-evaluate the play's moral dimensions as the characters respond to complications that range from the fantastic to the frighteningly realistic. Yoon situates Children of Heracles in its literary context, showing how Euripides constructs a unique kind of tragic plot from a wide range of conventions. It also explores the centrality of the dead Heracles and the leading role given to the socially powerless and the dramatically marginal. Finally, it discusses the historical contexts of the play's original performance and its political resonance both then and now.
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The Music of Tragedy

“Song and the Solitary Self: Euripidean Women Who Resist Comfort.” Phoenix 57: 209–31. . 2008. Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song ...

Author: Naomi A. Weiss

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520295902

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

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The Music of Tragedy offers a new approach to the study of classical Greek theater by examining the use of musical language, imagery, and performance in the late work of Euripides. Naomi Weiss demonstrates that Euripides’ allusions to music-making are not just metatheatrical flourishes or gestures towards musical and religious practices external to the drama but closely interwoven with the dramatic plot. Situating Euripides’ experimentation with the dramaturgical effects of mousike within a broader cultural context, she shows how much of his novelty lies in his reinvention of traditional lyric styles and motifs for the tragic stage. If we wish to understand better the trajectories of this most important ancient art form, The Music of Tragedy argues, we must pay closer attention to the role played by both music and text.
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The Children of Heracles

Assistant Professor of the Classics William Allan, Sir, Euripides, Collard C. C. William Allan ... Gender and Communication in Euripides ' Plays . Leiden .

Author: Assistant Professor of the Classics William Allan, Sir

Publisher: Classical Text

ISBN: 9780856687402

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 574

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The Children of Heracles is a powerful and challenging tragedy of exile and supplication. Driven from their homeland by Eurystheus, king of Argos, the children of Heracles flee as fugitives throughout Greece until they are granted protection in Athens.
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Brill s Companion to the Reception of Euripides

His research centers on Greek drama and its reception, rhetorics, ... He is the author of Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004299818

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 680

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Brill's Companion to the Reception of Euripides offers a comprehensive account of the reception of Euripides’ plays over the centuries, across cultures and within a range of different fields, such as literature, intellectual history, visual arts, music, dance, stage and cinema.
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Euripides Ion

... feet in the trimeters of Euripides and the chronology of the plays', CQ 35, 66–89. ... J.H. Kim On (2008) Gender and communication in Euripides' plays.

Author: Gunther Martin

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110523591

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 620

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Euripides’ Ion is a highly complex and elusive play and thus poses considerable difficulties to any interpreter. On the basis of a new recension of the text, this commentary offers explanations of the language, literary technique, and realia of the play and discusses the main issues of interpretation. In this way the reader is provided with the material required for an appreciation of this entertaining as well as provocative dramatic composition.
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From Agent to Spectator

ChongGossard, J. (2008), Gender and Communication in Euripides' Plays: Between Song and Silence. Clay, J. S. (1974), “Dêmas and Audê: the Nature of Divine ...

Author: Emily Allen-Hornblower

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110430097

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

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This book looks at witnesses to suffering and death in ancient Greek epic (Homer’s Iliad) and tragedy. Internal spectators abound in both genres, and have received due scholarly attention. The present monograph covers new ground by dealing with a specific subset of characters: those who are put in the position of spectator to (and, often, commentator on) their own deed(s). By their very nature, protagonists are confined to the role of witness to the suffering (or deaths) they have caused only for brief stretches of time — often a single scene or even just the length of a speech — but every instance is of central importance, not just to our understanding of the characters in question, but also to the articulation of fundamental themes within the poetic works under examination. As they shift from the status of agent to that of witness, these protagonists, qua spectators to the consequences of their actions, give voice to, dramatize, and enact the tragic motifs of human helplessness and mortal fallibility that lie at the core of Homeric epic and Greek tragedy and that define the human condition, in a manner that leads the audience looking on to ponder their own.
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