God Harlem U S A

God , Harlem U.S.A. : the Father Divine story / Jill Watts . p . cm . Includes bibliographical references and index . ISBN 0-520-20172-8 1. Father Divine . 2. Peace Mission Movement . 3. Afro - American clergy – Biography . I. Title .

Author: Jill Watts

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520916697

Category: History

Page: 249

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How did an African-American man born in a ghetto in 1879 rise to such religious prominence that his followers addressed letters to him simply "God, Harlem U.S.A."? Using hitherto unknown materials, Jill Watts portrays the life and career of one of the twentieth century's most intriguing religious leaders, Father Divine. Starting as an itinerant preacher, Father Divine built an unprecedented movement that by the 1930s had attracted followers across the nation and around the world. As his ministry grew, so did the controversy surrounding his enormous wealth, flamboyant style, and committed "angels"—black and white, rich and poor alike. Here for the first time a full account of Father Divine's childhood and early years challenges previous contentions that he was born into a sharecropping family in the deep South. While earlier biographers have concentrated on Father Divine's social and economic programs, Watts focuses on his theology, which gives new meaning to secular activities that often appeared contradictory. Although much has been written about Father Divine, God, Harlem U.S.A. finally provides a balanced and intimate account of his life's work.
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Daddy Grace

Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 112, 160–61; Weisbrot, Father Divine, 68–71. 58. Hubert Kelley, “Heaven Incorporated,” American Magazine, Jan. 1936; Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 106–7; Weisbrot, Father Divine, 74. 59.

Author: Marie W. Dallam

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814720370

Category: Religion

Page: 276

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with a new introduction by ERIC J. HOBSBAWM "Very usefully pulls the key passages from Gramsci's writings into one volume, which allows English-language readers an overall view of his work. Particularly valuable are the connections it draws across his work and the insights which the introduction and glossary provide into the origin and development of some key Gramscian concepts." --Stuart Hall, Professor of Sociology, Open University The most complete one-volume collection of writings by one of the most fascinating thinkers in the history of Marxism, The Antonio Gramsci Reader fills the need for a broad and general introduction to this major figure. Antonio Gramsci was one of the most important theorists of class, culture, and the state since Karl Marx. In the U.S., where his writings were long unavailable, his stature has lately so increased that every serious student of Marxism, political theory, or modern Italian history must now read him. Imprisoned by the Fascists for much of his adult life, Gramsci wrote brilliantly on a broad range of subjects: from folklore to philosophy, popular culture to political strategy. Still the most comprehensive collection of Gramsci's writings available in English, it now features a new introduction by leading Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm, in addition to its biographical introduction, informative introductions to each section, and glossary of key terms.
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Psychiatry and Racial Liberalism in Harlem 1936 1968

Greenberg, “God and Man in Harlem,” 519–20; Watts, God, Harlem, U.S.A., 11–12, 87, 110–12; 135–37; McKay, Harlem, 32–72. 121. Watts, God, Harlem, U.S.A., 97; McKay, Harlem, 32–49, 61–72; John Hoshor, God in a Rolls Royce: The Rise of ...

Author: Dennis A. Doyle

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781580464925

Category: Medical

Page: 268

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Reveals the history of the individuals who worked to make psychiatry more available to Harlem's black community in the early Civil Rights Era.
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Living in the Future

See also “'Father Divine' Does Duty of a God but Menaces Religion,” Chicago Defender, January 4, 1936, 12. 105. New York Amsterdam News, November 23, 1932, 1; Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 107. 106. Weisbrot, Father Divine, 209–10; Watts, ...

Author: Victoria W. Wolcott

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226817279

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

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Living in the Future reveals the unexplored impact of utopian thought on the major figures of the Civil Rights Movement. Utopian thinking is often dismissed as unrealistic, overly idealized, and flat-out impractical—in short, wholly divorced from the urgent conditions of daily life. This is perhaps especially true when the utopian ideal in question is reforming and repairing the United States’ bitter history of racial injustice. But as Victoria W. Wolcott provocatively argues, utopianism is actually the foundation of a rich and visionary worldview, one that specifically inspired the major figures of the Civil Rights Movement in ways that haven’t yet been fully understood or appreciated. Wolcott makes clear that the idealism and pragmatism of the Civil Rights Movement were grounded in nothing less than an intensely utopian yearning. Key figures of the time, from Martin Luther King Jr. and Pauli Murray to Father Divine and Howard Thurman, all shared a belief in a radical pacificism that was both specifically utopian and deeply engaged in changing the current conditions of the existing world. Living in the Future recasts the various strains of mid-twentieth-century civil rights activism in a utopian light, revealing the power of dreaming in a profound and concrete fashion, one that can be emulated in other times that are desperate for change, like today.
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A History of Religion in America

University Press, 2009), 26; Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 26–30. 75 Faucet, Black Gods of the Metropolis, 55–6; Hardy, “Faucet's (Missing) Pentecostals,” 15–30; Hankins, Jesus and Gin, 158–9. 76 Faucet, Black Gods of the Metropolis, 56; ...

Author: Bryan Le Beau

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351670128

Category: Religion

Page: 254

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A History of Religion in America: From the End of the Civil War to the Twenty-First Century provides comprehensive coverage of the history of religion in America from the end of the American Civil War to religion in post 9/11 America. The volume explores major religious groups in the United States and examines the following topics: The aftermath of the American Civil War Immigration’s impact on American religion The rise of the social gospel The fundamentalist response Religion in Cold War America The 60’s counterculture and the backlash Religion in Post-9/11 America Chronologically arranged and integrating various religious developments into a coherent historical narrative, this book also contains useful chapter summaries and review questions. Designed for undergraduate religious studies and history students A History of Religion in America provides a substantive and comprehensive introduction to the complexity of religion in American history.
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Celibacies

Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 14, 180n3. 75. Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 21. 76. For a history of the Sisters of the Holy Family by one of its early members, see Sister Mary Bernard Deggs, No Cross, No Crown: Black Nuns in Nineteenth ...

Author: Benjamin A. Kahan

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822377184

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

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In this innovative study, Benjamin Kahan traces the elusive history of modern celibacy. Arguing that celibacy is a distinct sexuality with its own practices and pleasures, Kahan shows it to be much more than the renunciation of sex or a cover for homosexuality. Celibacies focuses on a diverse group of authors, social activists, and artists, spanning from the suffragettes to Henry James, and from the Harlem Renaissance's Father Divine to Andy Warhol. This array of figures reveals the many varieties of celibacy that have until now escaped scholars of literary modernism and sexuality. Ultimately, this book wrests the discussion of celibacy and sexual restraint away from social and religious conservatism, resituating celibacy within a history of political protest and artistic experimentation. Celibacies offers an entirely new perspective on this little-understood sexual identity and initiates a profound reconsideration of the nature and constitution of sexuality.
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Race Nation and Religion in the Americas

Neither Divine nor the Peace Mission acknowledged this prior identity; Jill Watts in God, Harlem, U.S.A, provided the most conclusive link of Divine to his past as George Baker. 34. Watts, God, Harlem, U.S.A, 24–27. 35.

Author: Henry Goldschmidt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195149181

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

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A collection of new essays exploring the complex and unstable articulations of race and religion. Drawing on original research, the authors investigate how race and religion have defined global relations, shaped the everyday lives of individuals and communities and how communities use religion to contest the power of racism.
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Race Nation and Religion in the Americas

Neither Divine nor the Peace Mission acknowledged this prior identity; Jill Watts in God, Harlem, U.S.A, provided the most conclusive link of Divine to his past as George Baker. 34. Watts, God, Harlem, U.S.A, 24–27. 35.

Author: Henry Goldschmidt

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195149197

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 338

View: 588

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A collection of new essays exploring the complex and unstable articulations of race and religion. Drawing on original research, the authors investigate how race and religion have defined global relations, shaped the everyday lives of individuals and communities and how communities use religion to contest the power of racism.
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God in Gotham

“Chanting Throng Parades in Harlem,” New York Times, April 2, 1934; Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 58–70, 119–121; R. Marie Griffith, “Body Salvation: New Thought, Father Divine, and the Feast of Material Pleasures,” Religion and American ...

Author: Jon Butler

Publisher: Belknap Press

ISBN: 9780674045682

Category: History

Page: 320

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A master historian traces the flourishing of organized religion in Manhattan between the 1880s and the 1960s, revealing how faith adapted and thrived in the supposed capital of American secularism. In Gilded Age Manhattan, Catholic, Jewish, and Protestant leaders agonized over the fate of traditional religious practice amid chaotic and multiplying pluralism. Massive immigration, the anonymity of urban life, and modernity's rationalism, bureaucratization, and professionalization seemingly eviscerated the sense of religious community. Yet fears of religion's demise were dramatically overblown. Jon Butler finds a spiritual hothouse in the supposed capital of American secularism. By the 1950s Manhattan was full of the sacred. Catholics, Jews, and Protestants peppered the borough with sanctuaries great and small. Manhattan became a center of religious publishing and broadcasting and was home to august spiritual reformers from Reinhold Niebuhr to Abraham Heschel, Dorothy Day, and Norman Vincent Peale. A host of white nontraditional groups met in midtown hotels, while black worshippers gathered in Harlem's storefront churches. Though denied the ministry almost everywhere, women shaped the lived religion of congregations, founded missionary societies, and, in organizations such as the Zionist Hadassah, fused spirituality and political activism. And after 1945, when Manhattan's young families rushed to New Jersey and Long Island's booming suburbs, they recreated the religious institutions that had shaped their youth. God in Gotham portrays a city where people of faith engaged modernity rather than floundered in it. Far from the world of "disenchantment" that sociologist Max Weber bemoaned, modern Manhattan actually birthed an urban spiritual landscape of unparalleled breadth, suggesting that modernity enabled rather than crippled religion in America well into the 1960s.
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Getting What We Need Ourselves

Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A., 82. 24. Weisbrot, Father Divine and the Struggle for Racial Equality, 70–71. 25. Leonard Norman Primiano, “'And as We Dine, We Sing and Praise God': Father and Mother Divine's Theologies of Food,” in Religion, ...

Author: Jennifer Jensen Wallach, author of How America Eats: A Social History of US Food and Culture

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538125250

Category: History

Page: 272

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This multi-generational story begins before the transatlantic slave trade in West Africa and ends with a discussion of contemporary African American vegans. Demonstrating that food has been both a tool of empowerment and a weapon of white supremacy, this study documents the symbolic power of food alongside an ongoing struggle for food access.
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