Great War Prostheses in American Literature and Culture

Relying on some of the most recent developments in literary and disability studies, the book's six chapters explain how a prosthesis's spiritual promise was largely dependent on its ability to nullify an injury and help an amputee renew or ...

Author: Aaron Shaheen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192599629

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 555

Download →

Drawing on rehabilitation publications, novels by both famous and obscure American writers, and even the prosthetic masks of a classically trained sculptor, Great War Prostheses in American Literature and Culture addresses the ways in which prosthetic devices were designed, promoted, and depicted in America in the years during and after the First World War. The war's mechanized weaponry ushered in an entirely new relationship between organic bodies and the technology that could both cause, and attempt to remedy, hideous injuries. Such a relationship was also evident in the realm of prosthetic development, which by the second decade of the twentieth century promoted the belief that a prosthesis should be a spiritual extension of the person who possessed it. This spiritualized vision of prostheses proved particularly resonant in American postwar culture. Relying on some of the most recent developments in literary and disability studies, the book's six chapters explain how a prosthesis's spiritual promise was largely dependent on its ability to nullify an injury and help an amputee renew or even improve upon his prewar life. But if it proved too cumbersome, obtrusive, or painful, the device had the long-lasting power to efface or distort his 'spirit' or personality.
Posted in:

Great War Prostheses in American Literature and Culture

Thomson, Rosemarie Garland (1997) Extraordinary Bodies: Figuring Physical Disability in American Culture and Literature. New York: Columbia University Press ...

Author: Aaron Shaheen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192599612

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 632

Download →

Drawing on rehabilitation publications, novels by both famous and obscure American writers, and even the prosthetic masks of a classically trained sculptor, Great War Prostheses in American Literature and Culture addresses the ways in which prosthetic devices were designed, promoted, and depicted in America in the years during and after the First World War. The war's mechanized weaponry ushered in an entirely new relationship between organic bodies and the technology that could both cause, and attempt to remedy, hideous injuries. Such a relationship was also evident in the realm of prosthetic development, which by the second decade of the twentieth century promoted the belief that a prosthesis should be a spiritual extension of the person who possessed it. This spiritualized vision of prostheses proved particularly resonant in American postwar culture. Relying on some of the most recent developments in literary and disability studies, the book's six chapters explain how a prosthesis's spiritual promise was largely dependent on its ability to nullify an injury and help an amputee renew or even improve upon his prewar life. But if it proved too cumbersome, obtrusive, or painful, the device had the long-lasting power to efface or distort his 'spirit' or personality.
Posted in:

Commemorative Spaces of the First World War

Jansen-Verbeke, M. and George, W. (2013) 'Reflections on the Great War ... The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture, New York: Vintage Books.

Author: James Wallis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317309246

Category: Science

Page: 246

View: 699

Download →

This is the first book to bring together an interdisciplinary, theoretically engaged and global perspective on the First World War through the lens of historical and cultural geography. Reflecting the centennial interest in the conflict, the collection explores the relationships between warfare and space, and pays particular attention to how commemoration is connected to spatial elements of national identity, and processes of heritage and belonging. Venturing beyond military history and memory studies, contributors explore conceptual contributions of geography to analyse the First World War, as well as reflecting upon the imperative for an academic discussion on the War’s centenary. This book explores the War’s impact in more unexpected theatres, blurring the boundary between home and fighting fronts, investigating the experiences of the war amongst civilians and often overlooked combatants. It also critically examines the politics of hindsight in the post-war period, and offers an historical geographical account of how the First World War has been memorialised within ‘official’ spaces, in addition to those overlooked and often undervalued ‘alternative spaces’ of commemoration. This innovative and timely text will be key reading for students and scholars of the First World War, and more broadly in historical and cultural geography, social and cultural history, European history, Heritage Studies, military history and memory studies.
Posted in:

Matters of Conflict

In its multidisciplinary approach and wide-ranging contributions, the book looks at trench art and postcards through museum collections to prosthetic limbs, and examines the First World War and its significance through the things it left ...

Author: Saunders Nichol

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415280532

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 311

Download →

In its multidisciplinary approach and wide-ranging contributions, the book looks at trench art and postcards through museum collections to prosthetic limbs, and examines the First World War and its significance through the things it left behind.
Posted in:

Home Fronts

Much of the production of and research on British war literature and media today ... In Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain (2013), Ross J. Wilson ...

Author: Janina Wierzoch

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 9783839451878

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 286

View: 934

Download →

In recent years, the US-led invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq have had an impact on the UK rivalled only by Brexit and the global financial crisis. For people at home, the wars were ever-present in the media yet remained distant and difficult to apprehend. Janina Wierzoch offers an analytical survey of British contemporary war narratives in novels, drama, film, and television that seek to make sense of the experience. The study shows how the narratives, instead of reflecting on the UK`s role as invader, portray war as invading the British home. Home loses its post-Cold War sense of »permanent peace« and is recast as a home/front where war once again becomes part of what it means to be »us«.
Posted in:

Culture Heritage and Representation

Landsberg, A. (2004), Prosthetic Memory: The Transformation of American ... Moriarty, C. (1999), 'Review Article: The Material Culture of Great War ...

Author: Steve Watson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351946780

Category: Science

Page: 296

View: 768

Download →

The 'visual' has long played a crucial role in forming experiences, associations, expectations and understandings of heritage. Images convey meaning within a range of practices, including tourism, identity construction, the popularization of the past through a variety of media, and the memorialization of events. However, despite the central role of 'the visual' in these contexts, it has been largely neglected in heritage literature. This edited collection is the first to explore the production, use and consumption of visual imagery as an integral part of heritage. Drawing on case studies from around the world, it provides a multidisciplinary analysis of heritage representations, combining complex understandings of the 'visual' from a wide range of disciplines, including heritage studies, sociology and cultural studies perspectives. In doing so, the book provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and methodological tools necessary for understanding visual imagery within its cultural context.
Posted in:

Shell Shock Memory and the Novel in the Wake of World War I

Sculpting Doughboys: Memory, Gender, and Taste in America's World War I Memorials. Farnham: Ashgate, 2013. Winter, Denis. Death's Men: Soldiers of the Great ...

Author: Trevor Dodman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316404720

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 889

Download →

Shell Shock, Memory, and the Novel in the Wake of World War I explores the narrative traces, subaltern faces, and commemorative spaces of shell shock in wartime and postwar novels by Mulk Raj Anand, Ford Madox Ford, Mary A. Ward, George Washington Lee, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Christopher Isherwood. This book argues that World War I novels serve as an untapped source of information about shell shock, and renews our present understanding of the condition by exploring the nexus of shell shock and practices of commemoration. Shell shock novelists testify to the tenaciousness and complexity of the disorder, write survivors into visibility, and articulate the immediacy of wounds that remain to be seen. This book helps readers understand more fully the extent to which shell shock continues to shape and trouble modern memories of the First World War.
Posted in:

Deafening Modernism

Embodied Language and Visual Poetics in American Literature Rebecca ... One of the best-known examples of this phenomenon in relation to the First World War ...

Author: Rebecca Sanchez

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479828869

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 753

Download →

Deafening Modernism tells the story of modernism from the perspective of Deaf critical insight. Working to develop a critical Deaf theory independent of identity-based discourse, Rebecca Sanchez excavates the intersections between Deaf and modernist studies. She traces the ways that Deaf culture, history, linguistics, and literature provide a vital and largely untapped resource for understanding the history of American language politics and the impact that history has had on modernist aesthetic production. Discussing Deaf and disability studies in these unexpected contexts highlights the contributions the field can make to broader discussions of the intersections between images, bodies, and text. Drawing on a range of methodological approaches, including literary analysis and history, linguistics, ethics, and queer, cultural, and film studies, Sanchez sheds new light on texts by T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Charlie Chaplin, and many others. By approaching modernism through the perspective of Deaf and disability studies, Deafening Modernism reconceptualizes deafness as a critical modality enabling us to freshly engage topics we thought we knew.
Posted in:

Environmental Practice and Early American Literature

the lone individual nature writer began to consolidate its cultural power at ... At the level of content, nature writing after the Civil War would be the ...

Author: Michael Ziser

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107244474

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 579

Download →

This original and provocative study tells the story of American literary history from the perspective of its environmental context. Weaving together close readings of early American texts with ecological histories of tobacco, potatoes, apples and honey bees, Michael Ziser presents a method for literary criticism that explodes the conceptual distinction between the civilized and natural world. Beginning with the English exploration of Virginia in the sixteenth century, Ziser argues that the settlement of the 'New World' - and the cultivation and exploitation of its bounty - dramatically altered how writers used language to describe the phenomena they encountered on the frontier. Examining the work of Harriot, Grainger, Cooper, Thoreau and others, Ziser reveals how these authors, whether consciously or not, transcribed the vibrant ecology of North America, and the ways that the environment helped codify a uniquely American literary aesthetic of lasting importance.
Posted in:

The Unvarnished Truth

... Extraordinary Bodies: Figuring Physical Disability in American Culture and Literature (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997).

Author: Ann Fabian

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520218628

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 255

View: 983

Download →

A study of the "plain unvarnished tales" of unschooled beggars, criminals, prisoners, and ex-slaves in the 19th century. Fabian shows how these works illuminate debates over who had the cultural authority to tell and sell their own stories. She gives us the origins of that curious American genre of selling one's tale of woe to make a buck, ala Oprah, et al.
Posted in:

America History and Life

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131533650

Category: Canada

Page:

View: 169

Download →

Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.
Posted in:

Psychoprosthetics

Geertz C. Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books, 2001. Gerber D. Disabled Veterans in History. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, ...

Author: Pamela Gallagher

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1846289807

Category: Medical

Page: 164

View: 383

Download →

Psychoprosthetics is defined as the study of psychological aspects of prosthetic use and of rehabilitative processes in those conditions that require the use of prosthetic devices. Psychoprosthetics: State of the Knowledge brings together, into one easily accessible volume, the most recent and exciting research and knowledge in this new field
Posted in:

The Disability Studies Reader

The arms race in prosthetics demonstrated , in material form , the shift in ... Wounded Soldiers , and the Great War in Britain , " American Historical ...

Author: Lennard J. Davis

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:49015003308047

Category: Social Science

Page: 451

View: 628

Download →

"The second edition of The Disability Studies Reader builds and improves upon the classic first edition, which has sold well over 6000 copies since 1999. As a field, disability studies burst onto the scene across the social sciences and humanities in the 1990s, and the first edition of the reader gathered the best work that had been written on the subject, including essays by famous authors such as Susan Sontag and Erving Goffman. The new edition is more global in its coverage and adds material on genetic testing, the human genome, queer studies, and issues in developing countries. The size of the audience has grown since the first edition's publication, and the second edition's new material will make it even more useful for courses on the subject. Courses on the subject have mushroomed in the past ten years, and can now be found across the social sciences, humanities, and behavioral sciences." -- Publisher description.
Posted in:

Women and Evacuation in the Second World War

Alison Landsberg, Prosthetic Memory: The Transformation of American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004), ...

Author: Maggie Andrews

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441164117

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 695

Download →

Groups of young evacuees, standing on railway stations with gas masks and cardboard suitcases have become an iconic image of wartime Britain, but their histories have eclipsed those of women whose domestic lives were affected. This book explores the effects of this unparalleled interference in the domestic lives of women, looking at the impact on everyday experience and on ideas of femininity, domesticity and motherhood. Maggie Andrews argues that wartime evacuation is important for understanding the experience and the contested meanings of domesticity and motherhood in the 20th century. As this book shows, evacuation represents a significant and unrecognised area of women's war work, and precipitated the rise of competing public discourses about domestic labour and motherhood.
Posted in:

Cultures of United States Imperialism

31 See John Higham , “ The Reorientation of American Culture in the 1890s , " Writing American History : Essays on Modern Scholarship ( Bloomington ...

Author: Amy Kaplan

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015035321838

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 860

Download →

Begins to fill the gaping lacuna of imperialism in the standard histories of the US by exploring how US expansion has influenced people of other cultures. The 26 essays focus mostly on Africa and African Americans, but also consider the Philippines, Native Americans, Cuba, Latin America, and Disneyw.
Posted in:

Captivity Sentiment

Cultural Exchange in American Literature, 1682-1861 Michelle Burnham ... in initiating the Civil War, he was Xagrantly misreading her best-known novel.

Author: Michelle Burnham

Publisher: Dartmouth College Press

ISBN: 9781584650164

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 211

View: 695

Download →

Examines how traditional dichotomies give way to emergent cultural forms in the literature of captivity.
Posted in:

Encountering Injury

Fomenting Americans ' war fever at this time was a deluge of combat - themed popular culture . Long before April 1917 , Americans were inundated with books ...

Author: John Matthew Kinder

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P01008093Y

Category: Disabled veterans

Page: 872

View: 727

Download →

Taking as its focus the figure of the disabled soldier, Encountering injury: modern war and the problem of the wounded soldier examines the United States' tortured evolution into a global military power between the Civil War and World War II. Specifically, it explores Americans' anxieties about the social, political, and physical legacies of war-produced disability in an age of modern warfare. During much of the late nineteenth century, disabled veterans were venerated as icons of manly courage and national sacrifice. By the start of World War I, however, the social significance of disabled veterans had become a subject of fierce debate. While government propagandists continued to integrate severely injured soldiers into their fund-raising campaigns, many in the United States came to associate the nation's wounded warriors with pathological dependency, compromised masculinity, and the dangers the United States would have to face (and overcome) if committed to policies of martial interventionism. Drawing upon a wide range of primary sources-- including rehabilitation films, veterans' writings, antiwar photo-journals, and government memos-- this dissertation traces the emergence of the disabled soldier as a social, cultural, and foreign policy "problem" in early twentieth century America. At its core, it shows how concerns about wounded soldiers and mass-produced injury altered Americans' attitudes toward war, peace, and the veterans' welfare state. More broadly, it casts new light on Americans' attempts to reconcile their national and international ambitions with the bodily hazards of mechanized warfare.
Posted in:

The American War in Contemporary Vietnam

Prosthetic Memory : The Transformation of American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture , New York : Columbia ... “ Memory and Naming in the Great War .

Author: Christina Schwenkel

Publisher: Tracking Globalization

ISBN: UCR:31210020256887

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 605

Download →

Christina Schwenkel explores how the 'American War' is remembered and commemorated in Vietnam. She looks at monuments, museums, cemetaries, battlefield tours and related sites, and offers an assessment of they ways in which Vietnamese and American memories of the war intersect.
Posted in:

Exploration and Early American Culture

These books were gorgeously illustrated , not only with scenes of ... in the Third Great Age of Discovery that began about the time of the Great War ...

Author: William H. Goetzmann

Publisher: Amer Antiquarian Society

ISBN: STANFORD:36105016762754

Category: History

Page: 27

View: 741

Download →

Posted in:

The Face of War

New Zealand's Great War Photography Sandy Callister ... the Gaze : The Unseen Text in Women's War Writing ' , College Literature 31.2 , Spring 2004 , pp .

Author: Sandy Callister

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:30000122896404

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 371

Download →

"One hundred thousand New Zealanders went overseas to the First World War - many, for the first time, bearing Kodak cameras. The Face of War is the first book to examine the vernacular photos of World War I taken by its New Zealand participants. In this book, Callister discusses how photography was used to capture and narrate, memorialise and observe, romanticise and bear witness to the experiences of New Zealanders at home and overseas. By 1915 cameras had become affordable and popular, and were used by soldiers themselves to picture war as well as by officials, journalists and medical staff. But photography can be used both to record a true picture and to disguise the unpalatable, particularly in times of war. Callister's discussion is the first to argue for the importance of New Zealand photography to the history of war, but also examines in depth the contradictions of war photography: as a site of remembrance and forgetting; nation and sacrifice; mourning and mythology; subjectivity and identity. The Face of War is an authoritative history of New Zealand's World War I photography and its cultural, emotional and memorial roles"--Publisher's description.
Posted in: