Carolingian Approaches

This volume explores the extent to which the reinstitution of the Empire in Western Europe brought about new ways of reconciling the multitude of post-Roman identities with the way the past was shaped in historiographical narratives.

Author: Rutger Kramer

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503586562

Category:

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Historiography and Identity III

Taken together, these volumes hope to recover the potential that historiography developed to articulate and shape strategies of identification in the ancient, late ancient, and medieval worlds.

Author: Rutger Kramer

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503586554

Category:

Page: 400

View: 339

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This volume explores the extent to which the reinstitution of the Empire in Western Europe brought about new ways of reconciling the multitude of post-Roman identities with the way the past was shaped in historiographical narratives. From universal histories to local chronicles, and from narratives that support Carolingian rule to histories with a more local focus, the centralization of power and authority in the course of the eighth and ninth centuries forced those who engaged with their own past and that of their community to acknowledge the new situation, and situate themselves in it. The contributions in this volume each depart from a single source, event, or community, and relate their findings to the broader issue of whether the rise of the multi-ethnic Carolingian court allowed for more inclusive narratives to be created, or if their self-proclaimed place at the centre of the Frankish world actually created a context in which local communities were given new tools to assert themselves.
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Historiography and Identity VI

The first volume in the Historiography and Identity sub-series examines the many ways historiographical works shaped identities in ancient and medieval societies, providing a basis for understanding the successive developments in Western ...

Author: David Kalhous

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503585450

Category:

Page: 450

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The volume discusses Central European and Eastern Central European historiographies of the High and Late Middle Ages. It deals with histories written in a time which brought about a profound differentiation of medieval societies in these regions. The demand for reassuring identifications grew the more pressing as new social strata achieved their share of economic and political power. Narratives of identification produced and reproduced by historiography were tailored specifically for distinct social groups often using their languages: the vernaculars instead of the universal language of elite education, Latin. The focus of the volume is on the strategies of identification that individual works developed to balance many alternative modes of identification. Of an eminent interest is the interplay between the languages. In this interplay, orality and literacy interacted, with mutual effects on each other. The publication offers deep insights in these and related questions and herewith fills a significant scholarly gap.
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Historiography and Identity I

The six-volume sub-series Historiography and Identity unites a wide variety of case studies from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, from the Latin West to the emerging polities in Northern and Eastern Europe, and also incorporates a ...

Author: Walter Pohl

Publisher: Cultural Encounters in Late An

ISBN: 2503581579

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 899

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The six-volume sub-series Historiography and Identity unites a wide variety of case studies from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, from the Latin West to the emerging polities in Northern and Eastern Europe, and also incorporates a Eurasian perspective which includes the Islamic World and China. The series aims to develop a critical methodology that harnesses the potential of identity studies to enhance our understanding of the construction and impact of historiography. This first volume in the Historiography and Identity sub-series examines the many ways in which historiographical works shaped identities in ancient and medieval societies by focusing on the historians of ancient Greece and the late Roman Empire. It presents in-depth studies about how history writing could create a sense of community, thereby shedding light on the links between authorial strategies, processes of identification, and cultural memory. The contributions explore the importance of regional, ethnic, cultural, and imperial identities to the process of history writing, embedding the works in the changing political landscape.
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Ancient and Early Christian Narratives of Community

The series aims to develop a critical methodology that harnesses the potential of identity studies to enhance our understanding of the construction and impact of historiography.00This first volume in the 'Historiography and Identity' sub ...

Author: Walter Pohl

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503581587

Category:

Page: 330

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Historiography and Identity Re formulation in Second Temple Historiographical Literature

social-psychological notion of “textual identities” quite a useful one for explaining the relationship between textual ... and the role that renewed textual construction plays in the process of identity formation; (iii) It therefore ...

Author: Louis Jonker

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780567111371

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 401

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It is commonly accepted in various disciplines and contexts that history writing often (if not always!) contribute to the process of identity (re)formation. Using the past in order to find a renewed identity in new (socio-political and socio-religious) circumstances, is something that we also witness in Hebrew Bible historiographies. The so-called Deuteronomistic History, as well as the works of Chronicles and Ezra-Nehemiah, are often read from the perspective of a community trying to find a new identity in changed circumstances. In the Historical Books section at the 2008 Auckland SBL International Meeting, this perspective was investigated further. The papers presented included theoretical reflections on the relationship between historiography and identity (re)formation, as well as illustrations from Hebrew Bible historiographies (of the Exilic and Second Temple periods). These papers, together with a few responses to the papers, are offered here to a wider scholarly audience. Contributors include Jon Berquist, Mark Brett, Louis Jonker, Mark Leuchter, Christine Mitchell, Klaas Spronk, Gerrie Snyman, Ray Person, Armin Siedlecki, and Jacob Wright.
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Historiography and Identity II

This volume studies the social function of historiography in the Justinianic age and the post-Roman kingdoms of the West.

Author: Gerda Heydemann

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503584705

Category: Christians

Page: 120

View: 144

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The first volume in the Historiography and Identity sub-series examines the many ways historiographical works shaped identities in ancient and medieval societies, providing a basis for understanding the successive developments in Western historiography.00The six-volume sub-series 'Historiography and Identity' unites a wide variety of case studies from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, from the Latin West to the emerging polities in Northern and Eastern Europe, and also incorporates a Eurasian perspective which includes the Islamic World and China. The series aims to develop a critical methodology that harnesses the potential of identity studies to enhance our understanding of the construction and impact of historiography.00This first volume in the 'Historiography and Identity' sub-series examines the many ways in which historiographical works shaped identities in ancient and medieval societies by focusing on the historians of ancient Greece and the late Roman Empire. It presents in-depth studies about how history writing could create a sense of community, thereby shedding light on the links between authorial strategies, processes of identification, and cultural memory. The contributions explore the importance of regional, ethnic, cultural, and imperial identities to the process of history writing, embedding the works in the changing political landscape. --
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Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography

Significantly, this pre-Islamic identity is not reducible to one element or virtue of the Iranian past, ... see Ahmad Ashraf, “Iranian Identity i: Perspectives,” EIr; Ashraf, “Iranian Identity iii: Medieval Islamic Period,” EIr; ...

Author: Mimi Hanaoka

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316785249

Category: History

Page: 301

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Intriguing dreams, improbable myths, fanciful genealogies, and suspect etymologies. These were all key elements of the historical texts composed by scholars and bureaucrats on the peripheries of Islamic empires between the tenth and fifteenth centuries. But how are historians to interpret such narratives? And what can these more literary histories tell us about the people who wrote them and the times in which they lived? In this book, Mimi Hanaoka offers an innovative, interdisciplinary method of approaching these sorts of local histories from the Persianate world. By paying attention to the purpose and intention behind a text's creation, her book highlights the preoccupation with authority to rule and legitimacy within disparate regional, provincial, ethnic, sectarian, ideological and professional communities. By reading these texts in such a way, Hanaoka transforms the literary patterns of these fantastic histories into rich sources of information about identity, rhetoric, authority, legitimacy, and centre-periphery relations.
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Historiography and Identity

The series aims to develop a critical methodology that harnesses the potential of identity studies to enhance our understanding of the construction and impact of historiography.00This second volume of the series studies the social function ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1202297435

Category:

Page: 356

View: 703

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Explores the social function of historiography in the Justinianic age and the post-Roman kingdoms of the West.00The six-volume sub-series 'Historiography and Identity' unites a wide variety of case studies from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, from the Latin West to the emerging polities in Northern and Eastern Europe, and also incorporates a Eurasian perspective which includes the Islamic World and China. The series aims to develop a critical methodology that harnesses the potential of identity studies to enhance our understanding of the construction and impact of historiography.00This second volume of the series studies the social function of historiography in the Justinianic age and the post-Roman kingdoms of the West. The papers explore how writers in Constantinople and in the various kingdoms from Italy to Britain adopted late antique historiographical traditions and adapted them in response to the new needs and challenges created by the transformation of the political and social order. What was the significance of their choices between different models (or their creation of new ones) for their?vision of community?? The volume provides a representative analysis of the historiographical resources of ethnic, political, and religious identifications created in the various Western kingdoms. In doing so, it seeks to understand the extant works as part of a once much wider and more polyphonic historiographical debate.
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Historiography and Identity IV

The volume extends the mainly European focus of the series 'Historiography and ldentity' to probe into a more global perspective, exploring the historiographical cultures of a number of Eurasian macro-regions: China, Japan, Iran, South ...

Author: Daniel Mahoney

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503586589

Category: Eurasia

Page: 377

View: 880

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Historical writing has shaped identities in various ways and to different extents. This volume explores this multiplicity by looking at case studies from Europe, Byzantium, the Islamic World, and China around the turn of the first millennium. The chapters in this volume address official histories and polemical critique, traditional genres and experimental forms, ancient traditions and emerging territories, empires and barbarians. The authors do not take the identities highlighted in the texts for granted, but examine the complex strategies of identification that they employ. This volume thus explores how historiographical works in diverse contexts construct and shape identities, as well as legitimate political claims and communicate 'visions of community'.
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