With Liberty for Some

He also examines imprisonment within the context of the larger society. With Liberty for Some is a thought-provoking work that will shed new light on the ways in which imprisonment has shaped the American experience.

Author: Scott Christianson

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1555534686

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 158

Download →

From Columbus' voyages to the New World through today's prison expansion movements, incarceration has played an important, yet disconcerting, role in American history. In this sweeping examination of imprisonment in the United States over five centuries, Scott Christianson exposes the hidden record of the nation's prison heritage, illuminating the forces underlying the paradox of a country that sanctifies individual liberty while it continues to build and maintain a growing complex of totalitarian institutions. Based on exhaustive research and the author's insider's knowledge of the criminal justice system, With Liberty for Some provides an absorbing, well-written chronicle of imprisonment in its many forms. Interweaving his narrative with the moving, often shocking, personal stories of the prisoners themselves and their keepers, Christianson considers convict transports to the colonies; the international trade in captive indentured servants, slaves, and military conscripts; life under slavery; the transition from colonial jails to model state prisons; the experience of domestic prisoners of war and political prisoners; the creation of the penitentiary; and the evolution of contemporary corrections. His penetrating study of this broad spectrum of confinement reveals that slavery and prisons have been inextricably linked throughout American history. He also examines imprisonment within the context of the larger society. With Liberty for Some is a thought-provoking work that will shed new light on the ways in which imprisonment has shaped the American experience. As the author writes, "Prison is the black flower of civilization -- a durable weed that refuses to die."
Posted in:

American Prisons

Tracing both the history of the prison and the very idea of imprisonment in the United States, this book provides students with a critical overview of American prisons and considers their past, their present and directions for the future.

Author: David Musick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317616818

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 411

Download →

Imprisonment has become big business in the United States. Using a "history of ideas" approach, this book examines the cultural underpinnings of prisons in the United States and explores how shared ideas about imprisonment evolve into a complex, loosely connected nationwide system of prisons that keeps enough persons to populate a small nation behind bars, razor wire and electrified fences. Tracing both the history of the prison and the very idea of imprisonment in the United States, this book provides students with a critical overview of American prisons and considers their past, their present and directions for the future. Topics covered include: • a history of imprisonment in America from 1600 to the present day; • the twentieth-century prison building binge; • the relationship between U.S. prisons and the private sector; • a critical account of capital punishment; • less-visible prison minorities, including women, children and the elderly; and • sex, violence and disease in prison. This comprehensive book is essential reading for advanced courses on corrections and correctional management and offers a compelling and provocative analysis of the realities of American penal culture from past to present. It is perfect reading for students of criminal justice, corrections, penology and the sociology of punishment.
Posted in:

Private Prisons in America

Policy discussions of this trend toward prison privatization tend to focus on cost-effectiveness, contract monitoring, and enforcement, but in his Private Prisons in America, Michael A. Hallett reveals that these issues are only part of the ...

Author: Michael A. Hallett

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252073083

Category: Law

Page: 188

View: 746

Download →

Under the auspices of a governmentally sanctioned war on drugs, incarceration rates in the United States have risen dramatically since 1980. Increasingly, correctional administrators at all levels are turning to private, for-profit corporations to manage the swelling inmate population. Policy discussions of this trend toward prison privatization tend to focus on cost-effectiveness, contract monitoring, and enforcement, but in his Private Prisons in America, Michael A. Hallett reveals that these issues are only part of the story. Demonstrating that imprisonment serves numerous agendas other than crime control, Hallett's analysis suggests that private prisons are best understood not as the product of increasing crime rates, but instead as the latest chapter in a troubling history of discrimination aimed primarily at African American men.
Posted in:

Imprisonment in America

. The views of these professionals must be taken seriously."—Graham Hughes, New York Review of Books "This is a serious and enlightened and concerned attempt to fuse liberal and conservative attitudes and values to achieve a breakthrough ...

Author: Michael Sherman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226752808

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

View: 559

Download →

"For a few decades American prisons were the wonder of the world. [However] early hopes that a prison regime could be a powerful means of reforming most convicts have been abandoned, and prisons are seen even by some of those who think we need more of them as savage repositories, to be shunned or veiled rather than admired. This sad history is drawn with great insight and learning in [this] important new book about prisons and punishment in America by Michael Sherman and Gordon Hawkins. . . . The views of these professionals must be taken seriously."—Graham Hughes, New York Review of Books "This is a serious and enlightened and concerned attempt to fuse liberal and conservative attitudes and values to achieve a breakthrough in American penal policy."—Congressional Staff Journal
Posted in:

Fourth City

These essays document the authors’ efforts at self-help, the institutional resistance such efforts meet at nearly every turn, and the impact, in money and lives, that this resistance has on the public.

Author: Doran Larson

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 9781628950199

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 449

Download →

At 2.26 million, incarcerated Americans not only outnumber the nation’s fourth-largest city, they make up a national constituency bound by a shared condition. Fourth City: Essays from the Prison in America presents more than seventy essays from twenty-seven states, written by incarcerated Americans chronicling their experience inside. In essays as moving as they are eloquent, the authors speak out against a national prison complex that fails so badly at the task of rehabilitation that 60% of the 650,000 Americans released each year return to prison. These essays document the authors’ efforts at self-help, the institutional resistance such efforts meet at nearly every turn, and the impact, in money and lives, that this resistance has on the public. Directly confronting the images of prisons and prisoners manufactured by popular media, so-called reality TV, and for-profit local and national news sources, Fourth City recognizes American prisoners as our primary, frontline witnesses to the dysfunction of the largest prison system on earth. Filled with deeply personal stories of coping, survival, resistance, and transformation, Fourth City should be read by every American who believes that law should achieve order in the cause of justice rather than at its cost.
Posted in:

Gates of Injustice

Elsner presents an extraordinary, comprehensive, shocking expos of the American prison system.

Author: Alan Elsner

Publisher: Ft Press

ISBN: UOM:39015063208337

Category: Law

Page: 283

View: 709

Download →

Elsner presents an extraordinary, comprehensive, shocking expos of the American prison system. Readers learn why the prison epidemic matters to them, even if they've never met anyone who's gone to jail, and learn what it's really like on the inside with racial gangs, corruption, and sickness.
Posted in:

The Prison and the Gallows

This book examines the development of the movements that mediated the construction of the carceral state.

Author: Marie Gottschalk

Publisher:

ISBN: 0511224613

Category: Law

Page: 451

View: 788

Download →

Over the last three decades, the United States has built a carceral state that is unprecedented among Western countries, with nearly one in 50 adult Americans incarcerated today. This book examines the development of the movements that mediated the construction of the carceral state.
Posted in:

Prisons in America

Reflects upon the history and future of the prison system

Author: Nicole Hahn Rafter

Publisher: Abc-Clio Incorporated

ISBN: STANFORD:36105022166990

Category: Law

Page: 226

View: 796

Download →

Reflects upon the history and future of the prison system
Posted in:

Prisons and Punishment in America Examining the Facts

Synthesizing the latest scholarship in law and the social sciences on criminal sentencing and corrections, this book provides a thorough, balanced, and accessible survey of the major policy issues in these fields of persistent public ...

Author: Michael O'Hear

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440855436

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 725

Download →

Synthesizing the latest scholarship in law and the social sciences on criminal sentencing and corrections, this book provides a thorough, balanced, and accessible survey of the major policy issues in these fields of persistent public interest and political debate. • Provides readers with an accessible introduction to important, timely topics of public debate • Maintains a neutral, balanced perspective on a subject often a matter of heated partisanship • Reveals the subtle connections between different aspects of the criminal justice system that are often missed in policy discussions • Synthesizes leading academic work in law and the social sciences • Provides a balanced assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of significant reform proposals
Posted in:

Sentenced to Science

This is one among many episodes of the sordid history of medical experimentation on the black population of the United States. The story of the Holmesburg trials was documented by Allen Hornblum in his 1998 book Acres of Skin.

Author: Allen M. Hornblum

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271074269

Category: Medical

Page: 232

View: 502

Download →

From 1951 until 1974, Holmesburg Prison in Philadelphia was the site of thousands of experiments on prisoners conducted by researchers under the direction of University of Pennsylvania dermatologist Albert M. Kligman. While most of the experiments were testing cosmetics, detergents, and deodorants, the trials also included scores of Phase I drug trials, inoculations of radioactive isotopes, and applications of dioxin in addition to mind-control experiments for the Army and CIA. These experiments often left the subject-prisoners, mostly African Americans, in excruciating pain and had long-term debilitating effects on their health. This is one among many episodes of the sordid history of medical experimentation on the black population of the United States. The story of the Holmesburg trials was documented by Allen Hornblum in his 1998 book Acres of Skin. The more general history of African Americans as human guinea pigs has most recently been told by Harriet Washington in her 2007 book Medical Apartheid. The subject is currently a topic of heated public debate in the wake of a 2006 report from an influential panel of medical experts recommending that the federal government loosen the regulations in place since the 1970s that have limited the testing of pharmaceuticals on prison inmates. Sentenced to Science retells the story of the Holmesburg experiments more dramatically through the eyes of one black man, Edward “Butch” Anthony, who suffered greatly from the experiments for which he “volunteered” during multiple terms at the prison. This is not only one black man’s highly personal account of what it was like to be an imprisoned test subject, but also a sobering reminder that there were many African Americans caught in the viselike grip of a scientific research community willing to bend any code of ethics in order to accomplish its goals and a criminal justice system that sold prisoners to the highest bidder.
Posted in:

Punishment in America

In Punishment in America Michael Welch gathers together his seminal contributions to the most crucial and controversial issues in criminal justice.

Author: Michael Welch

Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated

ISBN: STANFORD:36105060449340

Category: Social Science

Page: 319

View: 812

Download →

In Punishment in America Michael Welch gathers together his seminal contributions to the most crucial and controversial issues in criminal justice. Topics range from the war on drugs, boot camps and institutional violence, to AIDS and HIV, capital punishment and the entire corrections industry. This coherent, but critical vision of punishment and corrections emphasizes social control but takes account of key social forces such as politics, religion and morality.
Posted in:

Prisons in America

The resulting book gives an overview of the development of corrections in America and a detailed, multi-faceted discussion of its current state.

Author: Marilyn D. McShane

Publisher: LFB Scholarly Publishing

ISBN: 1593325614

Category: Corrections

Page: 286

View: 369

Download →

McShane explains the controversies and issues surrounding not only the development of corrections systems in America but the most enduring problems they face. She utilizes a systems view that incorporates the external and internal factors that effect how prisons operate. Attempts to resolve the continuing political, economic, and philosophic dilemmas of incarceration involve complex motives and competing interests that are described in detail. Related legislation, law cases, and social trends are also analyzed. Students will be aided by study questions, supporting web site information and references to popular media sources that coincide with the points raised in Prisons in America. The resulting book gives an overview of the development of corrections in America and a detailed, multi-faceted discussion of its current state.
Posted in:

A Plague of Prisons

Sure to provoke debate and shift the paradigm of how we think about punishment, A Plague of Prisons offers a novel perspective on criminal justice in twenty-first-century America. “How did America’s addiction to prisons and mass ...

Author: Ernest Drucker

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 9781595589538

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 320

Download →

The public health expert and prison reform activist offers “meticulous analysis” on our criminal justice system and the plague of American incarceration (The Washington Post). An internationally recognized public health scholar, Ernest Drucker uses the tools of epidemiology to demonstrate that incarceration in the United States has become an epidemic—a plague upon our body politic. He argues that imprisonment, originally conceived as a response to the crimes of individuals, has become “mass incarceration”: a destabilizing force that damages the very social structures that prevent crime. Drucker tracks the phenomenon of mass incarceration using basic public health concepts—“incidence and prevalence,” “outbreaks,” “contagion,” “transmission,” “potential years of life lost.” The resulting analysis demonstrates that our unprecedented rates of incarceration have the contagious and self-perpetuating features of the plagues of previous centuries. Sure to provoke debate and shift the paradigm of how we think about punishment, A Plague of Prisons offers a novel perspective on criminal justice in twenty-first-century America. “How did America’s addiction to prisons and mass incarceration get its start and how did it spread from state to state? Of the many attempts to answer this question, none make as much sense as the explanation found in [this] book.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer
Posted in:

Incarceration in America

With more than 2 million people behind bars, America_s prison system is in crisis. Through this informative book, your readers will discover what happens when too many inmates are crowded into too few cells. Why is the system overburdened?

Author: Kerry Hinton

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9781615311095

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 823

Download →

With more than 2 million people behind bars, America’s prison system is in crisis. Through this informative book, your readers will discover what happens when too many inmates are crowded into too few cells. Why is the system overburdened? What is being done to improve the situation? What more can be done future? Empower your students with the facts through this timely, relevant book.
Posted in:

It s about Time

" This book often exposes students for the first time to varying points of view of the corrections system.

Author: James Austin

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: STANFORD:36105028512445

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 990

Download →

IT'S ABOUT TIME provides a compelling argument, based on extensive research, illustrating how the U.S. attempts to lower crime by using our correctional system as the primary solution. The book includes personal accounts from prisoners to illustrate the brutal aspects of prison life and the intent of the U.S. to create a "prison industrial complex." This book often exposes students for the first time to varying points of view of the corrections system. The authors, one of whom served 10 years in prison and is now a noted criminologist in the field, present the material in a powerful but compassionate manner. The book's strong research base and accessible style make it a popular choice for a wide variety of courses.
Posted in:

The Prison and the Gallows

This book examines the development of four key movements that mediated the construction of the carceral state in important ways: the victims' movement, the women's movement, the prisoners' rights movement, and opponents of the death penalty ...

Author: Marie Gottschalk

Publisher:

ISBN: 0511226462

Category: Capital punishment

Page: 468

View: 561

Download →

Throughout American history, crime and punishment have been central features of American political development. This book examines the development of four key movements that mediated the construction of the carceral state in important ways: the victims' movement, the women's movement, the prisoners' rights movement, and opponents of the death penalty.
Posted in:

Debtors and Creditors in America

While the debtors' prisons described in this book no longer exist, the author maintains that our credit-oriented society has yet to devise cheap, efficient, equitable, and humane methods of enforcing contracts for debt.

Author: Peter J. Coleman

Publisher: Beard Books

ISBN: 9781893122147

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 303

View: 312

Download →

Americans now depend more heavily upon credit than any other society on Earth, or any other time in history. Borrowing has become a way of life for millions of families, and it is hard to imagine a time when charge accounts did not exist. Nonetheless, it would be a mistake to assume that, because a wallet filled with plastic instead of cash is a relatively new phenomenon, Americans have not been borrowers and lenders since the colonization of the New World. Author Peter J. Coleman proves otherwise. In one Form or another -- notes of hand, book credit, commercial paper, mortgages, land contracts -- settlers borrowed to pay their passage from Europe, to buy and clear land, to build and operate mills, to purchase slaves, and to gamble and drink. Debtors' prison awaited those who could not pay their debts, and a pauper's grave received the unfortunate who lacked the private means to feed and clothe himself in prison. While the debtors' prisons described in this book no longer exist, the author maintains that our credit-oriented society has yet to devise cheap, efficient, equitable, and humane methods of enforcing contracts for debt.
Posted in:

Big Prisons Big Dreams

If America truly wants to reduce crime, Lynch urges readers to rethink cultural values that equate bigger with better.

Author: Michael Lynch

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813541402

Category: Social Science

Page: 274

View: 765

Download →

The American prison system has grown tenfold since the 1970s, but crime rates in the United States have not decreased. This doesn't surprise Michael J. Lynch, a critical criminologist, who argues that our oversized prison system is a product of our consumer culture, the public's inaccurate beliefs about controlling crime, and the government's criminalizing of the poor. While deterrence and incapacitation theories suggest that imprisoning more criminals and punishing them leads to a reduction in crime, case studies, such as one focusing on the New York City jail system between 1993 and 2003, show that a reduction in crime is unrelated to the size of jail populations. Although we are locking away more people, Lynch explains that we are not targeting the worst offenders. Prison populations are comprised of the poor, and many are incarcerated for relatively minor robberies and violence. America's prison expansion focused on this group to the exclusion of corporate and white collar offenders who create hazardous workplace and environmental conditions that lead to deaths and injuries, and enormous economic crimes. If America truly wants to reduce crime, Lynch urges readers to rethink cultural values that equate bigger with better.
Posted in:

Behind Bars

Author: Richard Kwartler

Publisher: Vintage Books USA

ISBN: STANFORD:36105002504269

Category: Community-based corrections

Page: 178

View: 332

Download →

Posted in: