Irish Global Migration and Memory

Transatlantic Perspectives of Ireland's Famine Exodus Marguerite Corporaal, Jason King ... scholarship on 103 Irish diasporic memory, peregrinations of 130 Irish emigration to North America 104 Irish Famine commemoration in museums 72–4 ...

Author: Marguerite Corporaal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315530796

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 140

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Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transnational Perspectives of Ireland’s Famine Exodus brings together leading scholars in the field who examine the experiences and recollections of Irish emigrants who fled from their famine-stricken homeland in the mid-nineteenth century. The book breaks new ground in its comparative, transnational approach and singular focus on the dynamics of cultural remembrance of one migrant group, the Famine Irish and their descendants, in multiple Atlantic and Pacific settings. Its authors comparatively examine the collective experiences of the Famine Irish in terms of their community and institution building; cultural, ethnic, and racial encounters with members of other groups; and especially their patterns of mass-migration, integration, and remembrance of their traumatic upheaval by their descendants and host societies. The disruptive impact of their mass-arrival had reverberations around the Atlantic world. As an early refugee movement, migrant community, and ethnic minority, Irish Famine emigrants experienced and were recollected to have faced many of the challenges that confronted later immigrant groups in their destinations of settlement. This book is especially topical and will be of interest not only to Irish, migration, and refugee scholars, but also the general public and all who seek to gain insight into one of Europe’s foundational moments of forced migration that prefigures its current refugee crisis. This book was originally published as a special issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents.
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Fictions of Migration in Contemporary Britain and Ireland

Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transatlantic Perspectives of Ireland's Famine Exodus. London: Routledge. Corporaal, Marguérite, Christopher Cusack, and Lindsay Janssen. 2014. “Introduction.” In Global Legacies of the Great Irish ...

Author: Carmen Zamorano Llena

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030410537

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 211

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This book examines how the transcultural and transnational migration of people, texts, and ideas has transformed the paradigm of national literature, with Britain and Ireland as case studies. The study questions definitions of migration and migrant literature that focus solely on the work of authors with migrant backgrounds, and suggests that migration is not extraneous but intrinsic to contemporary understandings of national literature in a global context. The fictional work of authors such as Caryl Phillips, Colum McCann, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Rose Tremain, Elif Shafak, and Evelyn Conlon is analysed from a variety of perspectives, including transculturality, cosmopolitanism, and Afropolitanism, so as to emphasise how their work fosters an understanding of national literature, as well as of individual and collective identities, based on transborder interconnectivity.
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The Poetics of Migration in Contemporary Irish Poetry

This book offers fresh critical interpretation of two of the central tenets of Irish culture – migration and memory.

Author: Ailbhe McDaid

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 3319638041

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 265

View: 700

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This book offers fresh critical interpretation of two of the central tenets of Irish culture – migration and memory. From its starting point with the ‘New Irish’ generation of poets in the United States during the 1980s and concluding with the technological innovations of 21st-century poetry, this study spans continents, generations, genders and sexualities to reconsider the role of memory and of migration in the work of a range of contemporary Irish poets. Combining sensitive close readings and textual analysis with thorough theoretical application, it sets out the formal, thematic, socio-cultural and literary contexts of migration as an essential aspect of Irish literature. This book is essential reading for literary critics, academics, cultural commentators and students with an interest in contemporary poetry, Irish studies, diaspora studies and memory studies.
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The History of the Irish Famine

Anbinder, T., 'Lord Palmerston and the Irish Famine Emigration', Historical Journal, 44.2 (2001), pp. 441–469. ... and J. King, 'Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transnational Perspectives on Ireland's Great Hunger and Exodus', ...

Author: Jason King

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315513676

Category: History

Page: 268

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The Great Irish Famine remains one of the most lethal famines in modern world history and a watershed moment in the development of modern Ireland – socially, politically, demographically and culturally. In the space of only four years, Ireland lost twenty-five per cent of its population as a consequence of starvation, disease and large-scale emigration. Certain aspects of the Famine remain contested and controversial, for example the issue of the British government’s culpability, proselytism, and the reception of emigrants. However, recent historiographical focus on this famine has overshadowed the impact of other periods of subsistence crisis, both before 1845 and after 1852. This volume breaks new ground in bringing together foundational narratives of one of Europe and North America’s first refugee crises — making visible their impact in shaping perceptions, public opinion, and patterns of memorialization of Irish forced migration. It documents eyewitness impressions of suffering Irish emigrants, and raises questions about what literary conventions, mnemonic motifs, and popular images can be found in eyewitness accounts, press coverage, and foundational narratives of Famine Irish forced migration. These primary sources provide a model for understanding how representations of forced migration shape public opinion and policy.
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The History of the Irish Famine

Anbinder, T., 'Lord Palmerston and the Irish Famine Emigration', Historical Journal, 44.2 (2001), pp. 441–469. ... and J. King, 'Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transnational Perspectives on Ireland's Great Hunger and Exodus', ...

Author: Christine Kinealy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315513881

Category: History

Page: 1480

View: 733

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The Great Irish Famine remains one of the most lethal famines in modern world history and a watershed moment in the development of modern Ireland – socially, politically, demographically and culturally. In the space of only four years, Ireland lost twenty-five per cent of its population as a consequence of starvation, disease and large-scale emigration. Certain aspects of the Famine remain contested and controversial, for example the issue of the British government’s culpability, proselytism, and the reception of emigrants. However, recent historiographical focus on this famine has overshadowed the impact of other periods of subsistence crisis, both before 1845 and after 1852. The narratives of those who perished, those who survived and those who emigrated form an integral part of this history and these volumes will make available, for the first time, some of the original documentation relating to an event that changed not only Irish history, but the history of the countries to which the emigrants fled – Britain, the United States, Canada and Australia. By bringing together letters, government reports, diaries, official documents, pamphlets, newspaper articles, sermons, eye-witness testimonies, poems and novels, these volumes will provide a fresh way of understanding Irish history in general, and famine and migration in particular. Comprehensive editorial apparatus and annotation of the original texts are included along with bibliographies, appendices, chronologies and indexes that point the way for further study.
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Translating Worlds

How cultural memories are translated in new cultural contexts. Migration, affect, memory, and translation. Migration, language, and transcultural memory. Migration, traumatic memory, and translation.

Author: Susannah Radstone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429655999

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 174

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This international and interdisciplinary volume explores the relations between translation, migration, and memory. It brings together humanities researchers from a range of disciplines including history, museum studies, memory studies, translation studies, and literary, cultural, and media studies to examine memory and migration through the interconnecting lens of translation. The innovatory perspective adopted by Translating Worlds understands translation’s explanatory reach as extending beyond the comprehension of one language by another to encompass those complex and multi-layered processes of parsing by means of which the unfamiliar and the familiar, the old home and the new are brought into conversation and connection. Themes discussed include: How memories of lost homes act as aids or hindrances to homemaking in new worlds. How cultural memories are translated in new cultural contexts. Migration, affect, memory, and translation. Migration, language, and transcultural memory. Migration, traumatic memory, and translation.
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The Coffin Ship

Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transatlantic Perspectives of Ireland's Famine Exodus. New York: Routledge, 2017. Costello, Con. Botany Bay: The Story of the Convicts Transported from Ireland to Australia, 1791–1853.

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479808762

Category: History

Page: 328

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A vivid, new portrait of Irish migration through the letters and diaries of those who fled their homeland during the Great Famine The standard story of the exodus during Ireland’s Great Famine is one of tired clichés, half-truths, and dry statistics. In The Coffin Ship, a groundbreaking work of transnational history, Cian T. McMahon offers a vibrant, fresh perspective on an oft-ignored but vital component of the migration experience: the journey itself. Between 1845 and 1855, over two million people fled Ireland to escape the Great Famine and begin new lives abroad. The so-called “coffin ships” they embarked on have since become infamous icons of nineteenth-century migration. The crews were brutal, the captains were heartless, and the weather was ferocious. Yet the personal experiences of the emigrants aboard these vessels offer us a much more complex understanding of this pivotal moment in modern history. Based on archival research on three continents and written in clear, crisp prose, The Coffin Ship analyzes the emigrants’ own letters and diaries to unpack the dynamic social networks that the Irish built while voyaging overseas. At every stage of the journey—including the treacherous weeks at sea—these migrants created new threads in the worldwide web of the Irish diaspora. Colored by the long-lost voices of the emigrants themselves, this is an original portrait of a process that left a lasting mark on Irish life at home and abroad. An indispensable read, The Coffin Ship makes an ambitious argument for placing the sailing ship alongside the tenement and the factory floor as a central, dynamic element of migration history.
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Imaging the Great Irish Famine

Campbell, Myles, 'Carolyn Mulholland', in A. Carpenter and P. Murphy (eds), Art and Architecture of Ireland Volume III ... Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transatlantic Perspectives of Ireland's Famine Exodus (London, 2016).

Author: Niamh Ann Kelly

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781838608729

Category: History

Page: 320

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The depiction of historical humanitarian disasters in art exhibitions, news reports, monuments and heritage landscapes has framed the harrowing images we currently associate with dispossession. People across the world are driven out of their homes and countries on a wave of conflict, poverty and famine, and our main sites for engaging with their loss are visual news and social media. In a reappraisal of the viewer's role in representations of displacement, Niamh Ann Kelly examines a wide range of commemorative visual culture from the mid-nineteenth-century Great Irish Famine. Her analysis of memorial images, objects and locations from that period until the early 21st century shows how artefacts of historical trauma can affect understandings of enforced migrations as an ongoing form of political violence. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of museum and heritage studies, material culture, Irish history and contemporary visual cultures exploring dispossession.
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Ireland and migration in the twenty first century

Darmody, M., Smyth, E., Byrne, D. and McGinnity, F. (2012) 'New school, new system: the experiences of immigrant students in Irish schools', in Z. Bekerman and T. Geisen (eds) International handbook of migration, minorities and ...

Author: Mary Gilmartin

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781784996574

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

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Considers migration to, from and within Ireland in the twenty-first century, covering the Celtic Tiger era of mass immigration to Ireland as well as the dramatic growth in levels of emigration that has occurred since the Irish economic collapse.
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Leaving the North

Migration and Memory, Northern Ireland 1921-2011 Johanne Devlin Trew. International Migration Review 8:245–62. Chamberlain, Mary. 1997. Narratives of Exile and Return. New York: St Martin's. ——. 2009. Diasporic Memories: Community ...

Author: Johanne Devlin Trew

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781781389553

Category: History

Page:

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Leaving the North is the first book that provides a comprehensive survey of Northern Ireland migration since 1921. Based largely on the personal memories of emigrants who left Northern Ireland from the 1920s to the 2000s, approximately half of whom eventually returned, the book traces their multigenerational experiences of leaving Northern Ireland and adapting to life abroad, with some later returning to a society still mired in conflict. Contextualised by a review of the statistical and policy record, the emigrants' stories reveal that contrary to its well-worn image as an inward-looking place - 'such narrow ground' - Northern Ireland has a rather dynamic migration history, demonstrating that its people have long been looking outward as well as inward, well connected with the wider world. But how many departed and where did they go? And what of the Northern Ireland Diaspora? How has the view of the 'troubled' homeland from abroad, especially among expatriates, contributed to progress along the road to peace? In addressing these questions, the book treats the relationship between migration, sectarianism and conflict, immigration and racism, repatriation and the Peace Process, with particular attention to the experience of Northern Ireland migrants in the two principal receiving societies - Britain and Canada. With the emigration of young people once again on the increase due to the economic downturn, it is perhaps timely to learn from the experiences of the people who have been 'leaving the North' over many decades; not only to acknowledge their departure but in the hope that we might better understand the challenges and opportunities that migration and Diaspora can present.
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Commemorating the Irish Famine

Drawing on an extensive global survey of recent community and national responses to the Famine's anniversary, and by outlining why these memories matter and to whom, this book argues how the phenomenon of Famine commemoration may be ...

Author: Emily Mark-FitzGerald

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781781381694

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 948

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'Commemorating the Irish Famine' explores the history of the 1840s Irish Famine in visual representation, commemoration and collective memory from the 19th century until the present, across Ireland and the nations of its diaspora, explaining why since the 1990s the Famine past has come to matter so much in our present.
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The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Fiction

Two recent examples of the opening up of this field of inquiry to Irish perspectives are the special issues of , respectively , Atlantic Studies ( 2014 ) on ' Irish Global Migration and Famine Memory and Symbiosis : A Journal of ...

Author: Liam Harte

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191071058

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 704

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The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Fiction presents authoritative essays by thirty-five leading scholars of Irish fiction. They provide in-depth assessments of the breadth and achievement of novelists and short story writers whose collective contribution to the evolution and modification of these unique art forms has been far out of proportion to Ireland's small size. The volume brings a variety of critical perspectives to bear on the development of modern Irish fiction, situating authors, texts, and genres in their social, intellectual, and literary historical contexts. The Handbook's coverage encompasses an expansive range of topics, including the recalcitrant atavisms of Irish Gothic fiction; nineteenth-century Irish women's fiction and its influence on emergent modernism and cultural nationalism; the diverse modes of irony, fabulism, and social realism that characterize the fiction of the Irish Literary Revival; the fearless aesthetic radicalism of James Joyce; the jolting narratological experiments of Samuel Beckett, Flann O'Brien, and Máirtín Ó Cadhain; the fate of the realist and modernist traditions in the work of Elizabeth Bowen, Frank O'Connor, Seán O'Faoláin, and Mary Lavin, and in that of their ambivalent heirs, Edna O'Brien, John McGahern, and John Banville; the subversive treatment of sexuality and gender in Northern Irish women's fiction written during and after the Troubles; the often neglected genres of Irish crime fiction, science fiction, and fiction for children; the many-hued novelistic responses to the experiences of famine, revolution, and emigration; and the variety and vibrancy of post-millennial fiction from both parts of Ireland. Readably written and employing a wealth of original research, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Fiction illuminates a distinguished literary tradition that has altered the shape of world literature.
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Linguistic Diasporas Narrative and Performance

This book explores the present-day Irish Diaspora in Argentina, using oral narrative and a sociolinguistic theoretical framework to draw out the features that define contemporary Hiberno-Argentine identity.

Author: Sarah O'Brien

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 3319514202

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 203

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This book explores the present-day Irish Diaspora in Argentina, using oral narrative and a sociolinguistic theoretical framework to draw out the features that define contemporary Hiberno-Argentine identity. The author analyzes the spoken memories and discourses of Irish-Argentine descendants to trace the socio-political evolution of a bilingual, bicultural community from World War II to the present day. In so doing, O’Brien reveals a legacy of emigration that is without precedent in the global Irish Diaspora, and which is deeply relevant to today’s global Irish citizenry in its challenging of preconceived notions of what it is to be Irish in the New World. As well as contributing to understandings of an immigrant linguistic journey over three generations, the book also provides a vital ethnographic portrait of an Irish descendant community that is acutely aware of its vulnerability and invisibility in an increasingly pluralistic South American society. This book will appeal to an interdisciplinary audience including scholars of migration, oral history, folklore, bilingualism, memory, sociolinguistics, narrative performance and Irish Diaspora studies.
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History Memory and Migration

commemoration, specifically in the emphasis that was placed on the Irish diaspora, the Third World and the factors that are common to Ireland in the 1840s and to modern famines'.35 Robinson referenced the Irish experience when calling ...

Author: Irial Glynn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137010230

Category: Social Science

Page: 251

View: 866

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By conversing with the main bodies of relevant literature from Migration Studies and Memory Studies, this overview highlights how analysing memories can contribute to a better understanding of the complexities of migrant incorporation. The chapters consider international case studies from Europe, North America, Australia, Asia and the Middle East.
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Museums and Migration

Museums and Migration explores the ways in which museum spaces - local, regional, national - have engaged with the history of migration, including internal migration, emigration and immigration.

Author: Laurence Gourievidis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317684893

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 500

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Recent decades have seen migration history and issues increasingly featured in museums. Museums and Migration explores the ways in which museum spaces - local, regional, national - have engaged with the history of migration, including internal migration, emigration and immigration. It presents the latest innovative research from academics and museum practitioners and offers a comparative perspective on a global scale bringing to light geo- and socio-political specificities. It includes an extensive range of international contributions from Europe, Asia, South America as well as settler societies such as Canada and Australia. Museums and Migration charts and enlarges the developing body of research which concentrates on the analysis of the representation of migration in relation to the changing character of museums within society, examining their civic role and their function as key public arenas within civil society. It also aims to inform debates focusing on the way museums interact with processes of political and societal changes, and examining their agency and relationship to identity construction, community involvement, policy positions and discourses, but also ethics and moralities.
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Uprootings Regroundings

Questions of Home and Migration Sara Ahmed, Claudia Castada, Anne-Marie Fortier, Mimi Sheller ... of Irish identity.7 This man's embodied memory presents a recognizable past to those in Ireland whose global Irish belongings are mediated ...

Author: Sara Ahmed

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000185119

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

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New forms of transnational mobility and diasporic belonging have become emblematic of a supposed ‘global' condition of uprootedness. Yet much recent theorizing of our so-called ‘postmodern' life emphasizes movement and fluidity without interrogating who and what is ‘on the move'. This original and timely book examines the interdependence of mobility and belonging by considering how homes are formed in relationship to movement. It suggests that movement does not only happen when one leaves home, and that homes are not always fixed in a single location. Home and belonging may involve attachment and movement, fixation and loss, and the transgression and enforcement of boundaries. What is the relationship between leaving home and the imagining of home itself? And having left home, what might it mean to return? How can we re-think what it means to be grounded, or to stay put? Who moves and who stays? What interaction is there between those who stay and those who arrive and leave? Focusing on differences of race, gender, class and sexuality, the contributors reveal how the movements of bodies and communities are intrinsic to the making of homes, nations, identities and boundaries. They reflect on the different experiences of being at home, leaving home, and going home. They also explore ways in which attachment to place and locality can be secured - as well as challenged - through the movements that make up our dwelling places.Uprootings/Regroundings: Questions of Home and Migration is a groundbreaking exploration of the parallel and entwined meanings of home and migration. Contributors draw on feminist and postcolonial theory to explore topics including Irish, Palestinian, and indigenous attachments to ‘soils of significance'; the making of and trafficking across European borders; the female body as a symbol of home or nation; and the shifting grounds of ‘queer' migrations and ‘creole' identities.This innovative analysis will open up avenues of research an
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Memory Ireland

For the generations that grew up in the diaspora after that mass migration, Famine tales and lessons were ... Mulcrone's chief source of evidence is journalism; he discusses how newspapers such as New York's Irish World long sup- plied ...

Author: Oona Frawley

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815633518

Category: History

Page: 388

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Recent years have seen cultural memory become a significant element in area studies and the humanities. Ireland, with its trauma-filled history and huge global diaspora, presents a fascinating subject for work in this vein. This series as a whole seeks to construct a landscape of cultural memory in Ireland, looking to map-through an examination of various historical moments, spaces, and cultural forms-the ways in which cultural memory shifts over time. Volume 3 focuses on the impact of trauma on cultural memory by considering two cruxes, the Famine and the Troubles, as formative to the study of Irish cultural memory. Topics include hunger strikes, monuments to the Famine, trauma and the politics of memory in the Irish peace process, and Ulster Loyalist battles in the twenty-first century. Gathering the work of leading scholars such as Graham Dawson, Richard Kearney, Margaret Kelleher, David Lloyd, and Joseph Valente, this collection is an essential contribution to the field of Irish studies.
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Irish Migration Networks and Ethnic Identities since 1750

The collective memory of the twentieth-century Irish diaspora centres on economic malaise, despondency and poignant stories of ... Migration was, of course, a global phenomenon that has affected virtually every geographical region.

Author: Dr Enda Delaney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136776656

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 358

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This collection of essays demonstrates in vivid detail how a range of formal and informal networks shaped the Irish experience of emigration, settlement and the construction of ethnic identity in a variety of geographical contexts since 1750. It examines topics as diverse as the associational culture of the Orange Order in the nineteenth century to
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Rethinking the Irish Diaspora

International Migration Policies: Government Views and Priorities. ... explores migration and diaspora, memory and history, and she is the author of Leaving the North: Migration & Memory, Northern Ireland, 1921–2011 (Liverpool 2013).

Author: Johanne Devlin Trew

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319407845

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

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This book provides scholarly perspectives on a range of timely concerns in Irish diaspora studies. It offers a focal point for fresh interchanges and theoretical insights on questions of identity, Irishness, historiography and the academy’s role in all of these. In doing so, it chimes with the significant public debates on Irish and Irish emigrant identities that have emerged from Ireland’s The Gathering initiative (2013) and that continue to reverberate throughout the Decade of Centenaries (2012-2023) in Ireland, North and South. In ten chapters of new research on key areas of concern in this field, the book sustains a conversation centred on three core questions: what is diaspora in the Irish context and who does it include/exclude? What is the view of Ireland and Northern Ireland from the diaspora? How can new perspectives in the academy engage with a more rigorous and probing theorisation of these concerns? This thought-provoking work will appeal to students and scholars of history, geography, literature, sociology, tourism studies and Irish studies.
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Multilingual Memories

Gallagher, J. A. (1936), 'The Irish Emigration of 1847 and Its Canadian Consequences,' CCHA Report, 3:43–57. ... Grillo, M. (2017), 'Plans Unveiled for Irish Commemoration Site in Montreal', Global News, 6 October.

Author: Robert Blackwood

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350071278

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

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Drawing on a range of disciplines from within the humanities and social sciences, Multilingual Memories addresses questions of remembering and forgetting from an explicitly multilingual perspective. From a museum at Victoria Falls in Zambia to a Japanese-American internment in Arkansas, this book probes how the medium of the communication of memories affirms social orders across the globe. Applying linguistic landscape approaches to a wide variety of monuments and memorials from around the world, this book identifies how multilingualism (and its absence) contributes to the inevitable partiality of public memorials. Using a number of different methods, including multimodal discourse analysis, code preferences, interaction orders, and indexicality, the chapters explore how memorials have the potential to erase linguistic diversity as much as they can entextualize multilingualism. With examples from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, and North and South America, this volume also examines the extent to which multilingual memories legitimize not only specific discourses but also individuals, particular communities, and ethno-linguistic groups – often to the detriment of others.
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