James II and the First Modern Revolution

This book examines how the forces of Anglicanism and Jacobitism collided, how a monarch came to forfeit so much goodwill so quickly, and through his own folly aided the effortless victory of the man and his wife, William and Mary (James's ...

Author: John Van Der Kiste

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 139900140X

Category:

Page: 216

View: 192

Download →

In February 1685, James II succeeded his brother Charles II on the English throne. His popularity had soared and fallen during his brother's reign. During a period of less than forty years that had seen the execution of their father, Charles I, the proclamation of a republic, and restoration of the monarchy a few years later, nothing could be taken for granted, but the omens for a reign of stability seemed good. However, James was a deeply flawed character who lacked his brother's pragmatism. Obstinate, arrogant, alternately pious and debauched, he was little liked by most of those who knew him well. Within three years, his efforts to promote and advance Catholicism in a nation that had predominantly embraced the Protestant faith had alienated and exhausted the patience of his subjects, the aristocracy and the church, who jointly appealed to William, Prince of Orange, his nephew and son-in-law, to intervene and protect English liberties. James fled his kingdom, and the 'Glorious Revolution', was swiftly achieved largely without bloodshed. This book examines how the forces of Anglicanism and Jacobitism collided, how a monarch came to forfeit so much goodwill so quickly, and through his own folly aided the effortless victory of the man and his wife, William and Mary (James's own daughter), who replaced him on the throne and at last brought a period of calm to a country that had only recently endured civil war and years of upheaval.
Posted in:

James II and the First Modern Revolution

Greaves, Richard L., Secrets of the Kingdom: British Radicals from the Popish Plot to the Revolution of 1688–89 ... Jock, James II, Soldier and Sailor (Hamish Hamilton, London, 1972) Higham, F.M.G., King James the Second (Hamish ...

Author: John Van Der Kiste

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781399001410

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 424

Download →

In February 1685, James II succeeded his brother Charles II on the English throne. His popularity had soared and fallen during his brother’s reign. During a period of less than forty years that had seen the execution of their father, Charles I, the proclamation of a republic, and restoration of the monarchy a few years later, nothing could be taken for granted, but the omens for a reign of stability seemed good. However, James was a deeply flawed character who lacked his brother’s pragmatism. Obstinate, arrogant, alternately pious and debauched, he was little liked by most of those who knew him well. Within three years, his efforts to promote and advance Catholicism in a nation that had predominantly embraced the Protestant faith had alienated and exhausted the patience of his subjects, the aristocracy and the church, who jointly appealed to William, Prince of Orange, his nephew and son-in-law, to intervene and protect English liberties. James fled his kingdom, and the ‘Glorious Revolution’, was swiftly achieved largely without bloodshed. This book examines how the forces of Anglicanism and Jacobitism collided, how a monarch came to forfeit so much goodwill so quickly, and through his own folly aided the effortless victory of the man and his wife, William and Mary (James’s own daughter), who replaced him on the throne and at last brought a period of calm to a country that had only recently endured civil war and years of upheaval.
Posted in:

Confessions of Faith in Early Modern England

during James's reign, the Glorious Revolution, and immediately after- ward, as well as “Imago Regis,” a ... See, for example, W. A. Speck, James II (London: Longman, 2002), and Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (New Haven: ...

Author: Brooke Conti

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812209211

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 696

Download →

As seventeenth-century England wrestled with the aftereffects of the Reformation, the personal frequently conflicted with the political. In speeches, political pamphlets, and other works of religious controversy, writers from the reign of James I to that of James II unexpectedly erupt into autobiography. John Milton famously interrupts his arguments against episcopacy with autobiographical accounts of his poetic hopes and dreams, while John Donne's attempts to describe his conversion from Catholicism wind up obscuring rather than explaining. Similar moments appear in the works of Thomas Browne, John Bunyan, and the two King Jameses themselves. These autobiographies are familiar enough that their peculiarities have frequently been overlooked in scholarship, but as Brooke Conti notes, they sit uneasily within their surrounding material as well as within the conventions of confessional literature that preceded them. Confessions of Faith in Early Modern England positions works such as Milton's political tracts, Donne's polemical and devotional prose, Browne's Religio Medici, and Bunyan's Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners as products of the era's tense political climate, illuminating how the pressures of public self-declaration and allegiance led to autobiographical writings that often concealed more than they revealed. For these authors, autobiography was less a genre than a device to negotiate competing political, personal, and psychological demands. The complex works Conti explores provide a privileged window into the pressures placed on early modern religious identity, underscoring that it was no simple matter for these authors to tell the truth of their interior life—even to themselves.
Posted in:

James II and the Three Questions

S. Pincus in 1688 : The First Modern Revolution ( New Haven : Yale University Press , 2009 ) goes further , seeing James as a modernizing ruler , attempting to impose a Catholic and absolutist monarchy , after the example of Louis XIV ...

Author: Peter Walker

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3039119273

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 433

Download →

The reign of James II, England's last Catholic king, remains controversial. His attempt to manipulate the electoral system to obtain a parliament that would abolish the Test Acts and Penal laws, which discriminated against his fellow Catholics, provoked his subjects to resistance and paved the way for the Revolution of 1688. The campaign is breathtaking both in its innovation and naiveté and nowhere is this more clearly highlighted than in the canvass of the gentry in the winter and spring of 1687-8. The canvass asked prospective MPs and electors to commit themselves to repeal. Historians have viewed the canvass as a failure: it did not bring the results the king hoped for and created a united opposition to the Stuart regime. However, as this book shows, scrutiny of the original canvass returns reveals that support for the king was stronger than was once assumed. It also reveals an endorsement of the general concept of religious toleration. William of Orange's invasion destroyed the king's plans, but given the time, could James have nurtured these 'green shoots' of religious pluralism in what was still a fiercely Protestant nation?
Posted in:

All Souls College Oxford in the Early Eighteenth Century

To many it seemed that James ii was dangerously close to crossing the line into becoming a tyrannical monarch.61 Perhaps seeing the writing on the wall, ... 63 Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution, 176–177; Evans, Oxford, 182.

Author: Jeffrey Wigelsworth

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004375352

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 507

Download →

A history of All Souls College under the Wardenship of Bernard Gardiner, that focuses on the ways in which the college and Gardiner were caught between competing visions of what England would look like in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution.
Posted in:

Early Modern Britain 1450 1750

The electoral methods of George I's ministers were in some ways similar to those of the Protectorate and James II. ... which sees James trying deliberately to create an absolute monarchy, see S. Pincus, 1688: the First Modern Revolution ...

Author: John Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107015111

Category: History

Page: 491

View: 828

Download →

A wide-ranging survey of the political, social, cultural and economic history of early modern Britain, offering a fully integrated four-nation perspective.
Posted in:

Parallel Religious Revolutions in Britain in 1688 and Egypt in 2013

Volume II. Philadelphia: Henry T. Coates & Co. Miller, John (2000) James II. New Haven: Yale University Press. Pincus, Steve (2009) 1688: The First Modern Revolution New Haven and London Yale University Press Russell, ...

Author: Thomas West

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527581555

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 571

Download →

Revolutionary periods, like Britain underwent in 1642-1688 and Egypt experienced in 2011-2013, are characterized by idealistic goals. So when and why did the idealistic goals of religious toleration and constitutional democracy in Britain and Egypt, as introduced by their respective post-revolutionary rulers James II and Mohamed Morsi, lead to counter-revolutions? Why did religion not stabilize regimes, (unlike Marx’s palliative or Alianak’s stabilization in times of crisis), but instead led to revolutions and counter-revolutions? This book explores these questions and provides an explanation by introducing a theoretical construct of the presence of sectarian strains in both countries that magnified the unwitting perceived “basic blunders” of these new and inexperienced rulers and hence led to counter-revolutions albeit with different end-results: a constitutional monarchy in Britain with the re-establishment of a “secure” Church of England and a return to a perceived non-sectarian military rule, an illiberal democracy, in Egypt.
Posted in:

The Mental Universe of the English Nonjurors

246 Gibson, James II and the Trial of the Seven Bishops, 134. 247 Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution, 196. 248 The day of their trial was in fact St. Peter's Day; it was actually 30 June 1688 when they were acquitted.

Author: John William Klein

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781796015676

Category: History

Page: 446

View: 651

Download →

The Glorious Revolution of 1688, which pushed James II from the throne of England, was not glorious for everyone; in fact, for many, it was a great disaster. Those who had already taken an oath of allegiance to James II and “to his heirs and lawful successors” now pondered how they could take a second oath to William and Mary. Those who initially refused to swear the oath were called Nonjurors. In 1691, Archbishop Sancroft, eight bishops, and four hundred clergy of the Church of England, as well as a substantial number of scholars at Oxford and Cambridge, were deprived, removed from their offices and their license to practice revoked, for their refusal. This nonjuring community over time adopted hybridized ideas, long-embraced and called out by the times and circumstances. Five paradigms shaped the English Nonjurors’ mental universe: a radical obedience, a Cyprianist mentality, using printing presses in place of the pulpits they had lost, a hybridized view of time, and a global ecumenical perspective that linked them to the Orthodox East. These patterns operated synergistically to create an effective tool for the Nonjurors’ survival and success in their mission. The Nonjurors’ influence, out of proportion to their size, was due in large measure to this mentality; their unique circumstances prompted creative thinking, and they were superb in that endeavor. Those five ideas constituted the infrastructure of the Nonjurors’ world. This study helps us to see the early eighteenth century not only as a time of rapid change, but also as an era of persistent older religious mentalities adapted to new circumstances, and the Nonjurors were brilliant at this adaptation.
Posted in:

Making Toleration

For the view that James could potentially have centralized the English state on an absolutist model, see Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (New Haven, 2009), 143—217. For a critique of this book's treatment of James II's ...

Author: Scott Sowerby

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674075917

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 270

Download →

Though James II is often depicted as a Catholic despot who imposed his faith, Scott Sowerby reveals a king ahead of his time who pressed for religious toleration at the expense of his throne. The Glorious Revolution was in fact a conservative counter-revolution against the movement for enlightened reform that James himself encouraged and sustained.
Posted in:

1688

The First Modern Revolution Steven C. A. Pincus. 2. Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James II, 5 vols. (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1849–61), 2:5–6, 46, 60, 109, 333–34, 394, 418; ...

Author: Steven C. A. Pincus

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300156058

Category: History

Page: 647

View: 573

Download →

Examines England's Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 through a broad geographical and chronological framework, discussing its repercussions at home and abroad and why the subsequent ideological break with the past makes it the first modern revolution.
Posted in: