Language as a Scientific Tool

Shaping Scientific Language Across Time and National Traditions Miles MacLeod, Rocío G. Sumillera, Jan Surman, ... plethora of issues related by the common disposition of scientists and natural philosophers to treat language as a tool.

Author: Miles MacLeod

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317327509

Category: History

Page: 244

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Language is the most essential medium of scientific activity. Many historians, sociologists and science studies scholars have investigated scientific language for this reason, but only few have examined those cases where language itself has become an object of scientific discussion. Over the centuries scientists have sought to control, refine and engineer language for various epistemological, communicative and nationalistic purposes. This book seeks to explore cases in the history of science in which questions or concerns with language have bubbled to the surface in scientific discourse. This opens a window into the particular ways in which scientists have conceived of and construed language as the central medium of their activity across different cultural contexts and places, and the clashes and tensions that have manifested their many attempts to engineer it to both preserve and enrich its function. The subject of language draws out many topics that have mostly been neglected in the history of science, such as the connection between the emergence of national languages and the development of science within national settings, and allows us to connect together historical episodes from many understudied cultural and linguistic venues such as Eastern European and medieval Hebrew science.
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Language as a Scientific Tool

This book seeks to explore cases in the history of science in which questions or concerns with language have bubbled to the surface in scientific discourse.

Author: Miles MacLeod

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317327493

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 928

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Language is the most essential medium of scientific activity. Many historians, sociologists and science studies scholars have investigated scientific language for this reason, but only few have examined those cases where language itself has become an object of scientific discussion. Over the centuries scientists have sought to control, refine and engineer language for various epistemological, communicative and nationalistic purposes. This book seeks to explore cases in the history of science in which questions or concerns with language have bubbled to the surface in scientific discourse. This opens a window into the particular ways in which scientists have conceived of and construed language as the central medium of their activity across different cultural contexts and places, and the clashes and tensions that have manifested their many attempts to engineer it to both preserve and enrich its function. The subject of language draws out many topics that have mostly been neglected in the history of science, such as the connection between the emergence of national languages and the development of science within national settings, and allows us to connect together historical episodes from many understudied cultural and linguistic venues such as Eastern European and medieval Hebrew science.
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Language as a Scientific Tool

This book seeks to explore cases in the history of science in which questions or concerns with language have bubbled to the surface in scientific discourse.

Author: Miles MacLeod

Publisher:

ISBN: 1315657252

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 902

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Language is the most essential medium of scientific activity. Many historians, sociologists and science studies scholars have investigated scientific language for this reason, but only few have examined those cases where language itself has become an object of scientific discussion. Over the centuries scientists have sought to control, refine and engineer language for various epistemological, communicative and nationalistic purposes. This book seeks to explore cases in the history of science in which questions or concerns with language have bubbled to the surface in scientific discourse. This opens a window into the particular ways in which scientists have conceived of and construed language as the central medium of their activity across different cultural contexts and places, and the clashes and tensions that have manifested their many attempts to engineer it to both preserve and enrich its function. The subject of language draws out many topics that have mostly been neglected in the history of science, such as the connection between the emergence of national languages and the development of science within national settings, and allows us to connect together historical episodes from many understudied cultural and linguistic venues such as Eastern European and medieval Hebrew science.
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Language and the Brain

Nina Dronkers, a scientist at the University of California at Berkeley, offers a wonderful take on the very beginnings of the ... At that time, autopsies were the only scientific tool available to directly study the human brain.

Author: Jonathan R. Brennan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192546364

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

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This book introduces readers to the state-of-the-art neuroscientific research that is revolutionizing our understanding of language. Interest in the brain bases of language goes back to the birth of the modern neurosciences in the late nineteenth century. Today, tools such as fMRI and EEG allow us to study brain activity non-invasively as people perform complex cognitive tasks like talking or reading. In this book, Jonathan Brennan shows how brain signals are connected with the intricate cognitive structures that underlie human language. Each chapter focuses on specific insights including the neural codes for speech perception, meaning, and sentence structure. The book also explores larger themes such as how to connect abstract notions like "knowing a language" to concrete signals that are measured in a laboratory, and how to reconcile apparently conflicting pieces of data that arise from different experiments. Written in an accessible, conversational style, and featuring a glossary of key terms, this slim guide will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in how the human brain allows us to use language.
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Hermeneutics of Education

Freud's notion of plurivocity of meaning stands in clear opposition to the classical view of language as a scientific tool. For Aristotle, “not to have one meaning is to have no meaning.”33 The univocity of meaning was seen as a.

Author: Andrzej Wiercinski

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783643911506

Category: Education

Page: 330

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A hermeneutics of education pays special attention not to educational structures, but the central role of conversation in the educational process. The key issue is the formation of the person as a unique reality of being and acting while supporting intersubjective understanding. The polyphony of understanding places the human search for meaning within the horizon of incompleteness and allows for both, spontaneity and rigor, in order to reach an understanding of what is happening to us and in us when we understand. Reflection on education is always inseparable from educational practice.
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In the Linguistic Paradise

... tools that can enable them to cope with expressing scientific concepts without first using some foreign language as ... linguistic challenges facing Nigerian languages in the contemporary scientific age LANGUAGE AS A SCIENTIFIC TOOL ...

Author: Ozo-mekuri Ndimele

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105119809569

Category: Linguistics

Page: 642

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The Worlds of Positivism

... forthcoming), Language as a Scientific Tool: Shaping Scientific Language across Time and National Traditions, ... and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, vol.

Author: Johannes Feichtinger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319657622

Category: History

Page: 367

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This book is the first to trace the origins and significance of positivism on a global scale. Taking their cues from Auguste Comte and John Stuart Mill, positivists pioneered a universal, experience-based culture of scientific inquiry for studying nature and society—a new science that would enlighten all of humankind. Positivists envisaged one world united by science, but their efforts spawned many. Uncovering these worlds of positivism, the volume ranges from India, the Ottoman Empire, and the Iberian Peninsula to Central Europe, Russia, and Brazil, examining positivism’s impact as one of the most far-reaching intellectual movements of the modern world. Positivists reinvented science, claiming it to be distinct from and superior to the humanities. They predicated political governance on their refashioned science of society, and as political activists, they sought and often failed to reconcile their universalism with the values of multiculturalism. Providing a genealogy of scientific governance that is sorely needed in an age of post-truth politics, this volume breaks new ground in the fields of intellectual and global history, the history of science, and philosophy.
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Semantics and Cultural Change in the British Enlightenment New Words and Old

The Politics of Language 1791–1819 (Clarendon Press, 1984). ... in the Augustan Age: The Case of John Wilkins and Jonathan Swift,” in Language as a Scientific Tool: Shaping Scientific Language Across Time and National Tradition, ed.

Author: Carey McIntosh

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004430631

Category: History

Page: 232

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A study of English semantics during the Enlightenment. New words 1650-1800 reflect the new middle-class culture of sociability, commerce, and science. Old mostly obsolete words illuminate the realities of working-class life, exhausting labor, dirt, outrageous sexism, magic, horses, bizarre food.
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Handbook of Early Literacy Research

... always involve human beings both coordinating and getting coordinated by other people , as well as forms of language , nonverbal images and symbols , objects , tools , technologies , sites , and times ( Latour , 1987 , 1991 ) .

Author: Susan B. Neuman

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 1572308958

Category: Education

Page: 494

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Current research increasingly highlights the role of early literacy in young children's development--and facilitates the growth of practices and policies that promote success among diverse learners. The Handbook of Early Literacy Research presents cutting-edge knowledge on all aspects of literacy learning in the preschool years. Volume 1 covers such essential topics as major theories of early literacy; writing development; understanding learning disabilities, including early intervention approaches; cultural and socioeconomic contexts of literacy development; and tutoring programs and other special intervention efforts.
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Frege Explained

Rather, he regards his logically perfect language, Begriffsschrift, as a scientific tool. Frege's notation is designed, as Boole's was, to be used in connection with a method for evaluating inferences. In the preface to Begriffsschrift ...

Author: Joan Weiner

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 9780812697520

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

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What is the number one? How can we be sure that 2+2=4? These apparently ssimple questions have perplexed philosophers for thousands of years, but discussion of them was transformed by the German philosopher Gottlob Frege (1848-1925). Frege (pronounced Fray-guh)believed that arithmetic and all mathematics are derived from logic, and to prove this he developed a completely new approach to logic and numbers. Joan Weiner presents a very clear outline of Frege's life and ideas, showing how his thinking evolved through successive books and articles.
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