Long Island Rail Road Main Line East

The Long Island Rail Road (LIRR), the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name, was chartered in 1834 for the purpose of running trains from the Brooklyn waterfront to the eastern terminal at Greenport.

Author: Don Fisher

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467102537

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 624

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The Long Island Rail Road (LIRR), the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name, was chartered in 1834 for the purpose of running trains from the Brooklyn waterfront to the eastern terminal at Greenport. The east end of the LIRR main line consists of a 70-mile stretch of track from Hicksville to Greenport. At one time, there were 29 passenger stations along this east end route, 14 of which are active today. A decommissioned signal tower and obsolete turntable are located on this route. Two stations, Riverhead and Greenport, are locations of the Railroad Museum of Long Island. The 23 miles of track between Hicksville and Ronkonkoma is electrified by third rail current, the electrification having been completed in 1987. Single-track territory since 1844, the line is currently being double-tracked as far east as Ronkonkoma.
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Long Island Rail Road Port Jefferson Branch

Between 1895 and 1938, the branch extended 10 miles east to Wading River. The branch was not electrified until 1970 and that was only to Huntington Station, east of which is served by diesel and dual-mode locomotives.

Author: David D. Morrison, Foreword by David Keller

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467120135

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 467

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The Long Island Rail Road is the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name. As the busiest railroad in North America, it carries 265,000 customers each weekday aboard 735 trains on 11 different branches. The Port Jefferson Branch serves 10 stations from Hicksville to Port Jefferson and carries nearly 20 percent of the railroad's passenger traffic over its 32 miles of track. Hicksville Station is the site of the October 8, 1955, "End of Steam Ceremony," when steam locomotives were retired from service. The oldest surviving station building constructed by the Long Island Rail Road is on this branch at St. James. Between 1895 and 1938, the branch extended 10 miles east to Wading River. The branch was not electrified until 1970 and that was only to Huntington Station, east of which is served by diesel and dual-mode locomotives.
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Long Island Rail Road Babylon Branch

The Long Island Rail Road is the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name.

Author: David D. Morrison

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467105613

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 813

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The Long Island Rail Road is the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name. It is the busiest railroad in North America, with 90 million annual riders on 735 trains covering 11 different branches. The Babylon Branch, which serves 15 stations from Valley Stream to Babylon, carries 18 million annual riders over its 20-mile right-of-way. The branch has been totally electrified since 1925 and has not had any street crossings at grade since 1979. There are three signal towers and four junctions for other branches on this line. Two railroad museums are housed in former branch station buildings, those being Wantagh and Lindenhurst.
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Long Island Rail Road Stations

Many of the historic stations featured in this book have been preserved by local preservation groups, while others have been replaced with modern buildings to accommodate the passengers who commute on the nation's largest commuter railroad.

Author: David D. Morrison

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738511803

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 820

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Chartered in 1834 to provide a route between New York City and Boston, the Long Island Rail Road ran from the Brooklyn waterfront through the center of Long Island to Greenport. The railroad served the agricultural market on Long Island until branches and competing lines eventually developed on the north and south shores of the island and several hundred passenger stations were built. After Penn Station was opened in 1910, the number of passengers commuting between Manhattan and Long Island began to multiply. Today, one hundred twenty-five stations serve the Long Island Rail Road. Long Island Rail Road Stations contains vintage postcards of the old Penn Station, which was demolished in the mid-1960s; the Grand Stairway at the Forest Hills Station, where Theodore Roosevelt delivered his famous unification speech on July 4, 1917; and the Amagansett station building, where Nazi spies boarded a train bound for New York City on June 13, 1942. Many of the historic stations featured in this book have been preserved by local preservation groups, while others have been replaced with modern buildings to accommodate the passengers who commute on the nation's largest commuter railroad.
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Long Island Rail Road

Archival and modern photography, route maps, print ads, and timetables illustrate the story behind this iconic commuter railroad from 1834 to the present, including such colorful tales as Mile-a-Minute Murphy and the Great Bicycle-Long ...

Author: Stan Fischler

Publisher: Voyageur Press

ISBN: 0760326851

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 242

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Granted an operating charter in 1834, the Long Island Railroad is the oldest railway in America operating under its original name. This illustrated history begins with its origins in the Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad in 1832, and covers such topics as the original attempts to reach Boston via Long Island and ferry services to Connecticut.
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The Long Island Rail Road in Early Photographs

Over 220 rare photos, informative text document 1844 origin and development of rail service on Long Island. Vintage views of early trains, locomotives, stations, passengers, crews, much more. Captions.

Author: Ron Ziel

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486157603

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 273

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Over 220 rare photos, informative text document 1844 origin and development of rail service on Long Island. Vintage views of early trains, locomotives, stations, passengers, crews, much more. Captions.
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The Gravy Train An Inside Look at the Long Island Rail Road

Friends and professional colleagues advised me to decline the job offer. However, I was a railroad buff and the opportunity to work for a railroad overshadowed any tredpidations.

Author: Dan Ruppert

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 9781412251723

Category: Political Science

Page: 126

View: 998

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Growing up in the suburbs of New York City on Long Island, I took a keen interest in all forms of transportation, especially trains. Afer graduating college, I worked as an industrial engineer for private sector corporations progressing to a middle management position within a Fortune 25 Company. In 1983 I accepted a job opportunity with the Long Island Rail Road as an industrial engineer. The LIRR is a government-subsidized agency that is part of a larger regional organization called the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The LIRR had embarked on a very ambitious improvement program to upgrade their physical plants. This plan included the construction of a new railcar maintenance facility. The new facility was to replace their one hundred year old maintenance shops. I was hired to develop facility layouts for the most advanced rail car maintenance facility in the country. Friends and professional colleagues advised me to decline the job offer. However, I was a railroad buff and the opportunity to work for a railroad overshadowed any tredpidations. For decades, the LIRR had bore the brunt of adverse publicity. I would often consider much of the critisism as being too harsh and misguided. Not long after commencing employment, my perspective of the LIRR would be completely transformed. The inefficient and workplace abuses I witnessed first hand could only flourish in publicly subsidized environment. My job required me to observe and analyze the maintenance and repair operations performed on commuter railcars. My next step was identifying more efficient methods. I would then implement these improvements into the design of the new railcar maintenance facilities. I was met with a wall of resistence and non-cooperation from the unionized workforce. The LIRR had languished in decades of inefficient work habits supplemented with managerial coplacency and rampant nepotism. I would operate in a very hostile environment that had no incentive to embrace improvements. It would be in the better interests of the unions to maintain low productivity and therefore justify the gross overstaffing that existed for decades. Upon completion of developing the facility layouts, the next phase of my responsibilities involved coordination with design consultants hired by the LIRR. The consultants were responsible for the architectural and structural designs of the new maintenance facility. The consultans typically were selected based on political connections and not their level of expertise. The design phase was muddled with incompetence and waste. Inept project management would add tens of millions of dollars and lengthly delays to the construction phase of the project. Upon completion of construction, a new regime intent on maintaining the status quo within the LIRR assues control of the new maintenance facility. The new regime is not committed to capitalizing on the labor efficiencies offered by the new facility. Key positions are then filled with managers' intent in preserving the traditional inefficient ways of the LIRR. My story concludes with the agendas of the new regime and conflicts with those who were trying to transform the LIRR into a socially responsible institution. My trials and tribulations along with personal victories and setbacks are all the basis of my book.
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The Long Island Rail Road

I also wish to credit my father , Henry Keller , who spent lots of his time driving me all over the island to take railroad photographs when I was a young ...

Author: David Keller

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738536377

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 129

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Chartered on April 24, 1834, as a route from Brooklyn to Boston, the Long Island Rail Road commenced in 1836 with service between Brooklyn and Jamaica, New York. The railroad has linked Long Island and New York City through several periods of increasing immigration and population beginning in the 1880s. Farmers and fishermen have depended on the railroad for their livelihood, and every summer thousands of tourists flock to Long Island beaches on the Long Island Rail Road. It is still the nation's largest commuter railroad, transporting an average of over two hundred fifty thousand commuters daily. The Long Island Rail Road: 1925-1975 offers a behind-the-scenes look at freight and passenger activities and the people who worked on the railroad. These one-of-a-kind photographs depict structures no longer in use, such as towers, water tanks, and crossing shanties, as well as electric motive power and other facets of a working railroad.
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Long Island Railroad

Where does the controlling interest in this railroad lie ? ... Obviously any losses that may be incurred by the Long Island Railroad , if what I have said ...

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112119650999

Category: Jamaica (New York, N.Y.)

Page: 50

View: 928

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Long Island Rail Road

Long Island Rail Road Multiple Unit Cars Volume 1: Cars Built 1905–1949. AvonBy-The-Sea, NJ: Morning Sun Books, 2020. Fischler, Stan. Long Island Rail Road.

Author: David D. Morrison

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439671894

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 532

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The Long Island Rail Road is the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name. It is the busiest railroad in North America, with 90 million annual riders on 735 trains covering 11 different branches. The Babylon Branch, which serves 15 stations from Valley Stream to Babylon, carries 18 million annual riders over its 20-mile right-of-way. The branch has been totally electrified since 1925 and has not had any street crossings at grade since 1979. There are three signal towers and four junctions for other branches on this line. Two railroad museums are housed in former branch station buildings, those being Wantagh and Lindenhurst.
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Long Island Rail Road Safety Practices

Mr. Chairman , the Long Island Rail Road serves 272,000 commuters daily , making it the Nation's busiest commuter railroad system . The Long Island Rail ...

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Energy and Commerce. Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials

Publisher:

ISBN: PSU:000016128552

Category: Railroads

Page: 86

View: 272

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Long Island Rail Road

Arthur Huneke collection Х 88471987 Valid for Travel in Either Direction Long Island Rail Road 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Flatbush Ave I CITY Jamaica 3 1 Strike Fare ...

Author: Stan Fischler

Publisher:

ISBN: 1616731567

Category: Railroads

Page: 2

View: 432

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Long Island Railroad Information Bulletin

He was a member of the Brotherhood of Loco- at Winfield , and to Syosset and Glen Head : There motive Engineers , Long Island Railroad Veteran was a road to ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X030726893

Category: Railroads

Page:

View: 303

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Long Island Rail Road intrastate Passenger Fares

INTRODUCTION The Long Island Rail Road is located entirely within the State of New York . It carries the greatest volume of commuters of any railroad in the ...

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112119745443

Category: Railroads

Page: 103

View: 630

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Considers legislation to exclude intrastate railway passenger fare regulation from ICC jurisdiction. Focuses on New York State Public Service Commission proposed regulation of the Long Island Railroad.
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Revisiting the Long Island Rail Road

One ELECTRIFIED SERVICE Celebrating 100 years ( 1905–2005 ) of electrification , the Long Island Rail Road owes much of its success and viability to its ...

Author: David Keller

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738538299

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 353

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Planned and chartered on April 24, 1834, the Long Island Rail Road commenced operations in 1836 to provide a route to Boston. Stretching 110 miles east of New York City, the Long Island Rail Road has been the backbone of population growth and suburban development for over a hundred years. Electrification was begun on the Long Island Rail Road in 1905. Whether it was commuter, freight, or special trains, third-rail operations played a major role in the Long Island Rail Road's development as well as the people, places, and industries it served. This book offers an insider's view of the Morris Park shops and photographs of the varied passenger operations found on the Long Island Rail Road.
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Long Island Rail Road Oyster Bay Branch

is the third-oldest station building on the LIRR, and it is the oldest one on the branch. For a brief period, there was a North Roslyn Station, ...

Author: David D. Morrison

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467128544

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 570

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The Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) is the oldest railroad in the country still operating under its original name. The Oyster Bay Branch is one of the smaller branches but is probably the most historically significant one. There are 12 stations along the 14.3 miles of track (one station is closed but the building still stands). Of the 13 still existing LIRR stations built in the 1800s, six are on the Oyster Bay Branch. The branch is partly electrified, and two signal towers exist, one operating and one abandoned. At the terminal, Oyster Bay Station is the home train station of the 26th president of the United States--Theodore Roosevelt. The Oyster Bay Railroad Museum is currently restoring the train station, as well as the historic turntable and steam locomotive No. 35.
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