Making Modern Science

Written by seasoned historians, this book will encourage students to see the history of science not as a series of names and dates but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships between science and modern society.

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226068625

Category: Science

Page: 538

View: 968

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The development of science, according to respected scholars Peter J. Bowler and Iwan Rhys Morus, expands our knowledge and control of the world in ways that affect-but are also affected by-society and culture. In Making Modern Science, a text designed for introductory college courses in the history of science and as a single-volume introduction for the general reader, Bowler and Morus explore both the history of science itself and its influence on modern thought. Opening with an introduction that explains developments in the history of science over the last three decades and the controversies these initiatives have engendered, the book then proceeds in two parts. The first section considers key episodes in the development of modern science, including the Scientific Revolution and individual accomplishments in geology, physics, and biology. The second section is an analysis of the most important themes stemming from the social relations of science-the discoveries that force society to rethink its religious, moral, or philosophical values. Making Modern Science thus chronicles all major developments in scientific thinking, from the revolutionary ideas of the seventeenth century to the contemporary issues of evolutionism, genetics, nuclear physics, and modern cosmology. Written by seasoned historians, this book will encourage students to see the history of science not as a series of names and dates but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships between science and modern society. The first survey of its kind, Making Modern Science is a much-needed and accessible introduction to the history of science, engagingly written for undergraduates and curious readers alike.
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Making Modern Science

In this new edition of the top-selling coursebook, seasoned historians Peter J. Bowler and Iwan Rhys Morus expand on their authoritative survey of how the development of science has shaped our world.

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher:

ISBN: 022636576X

Category:

Page: 608

View: 161

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In this new edition of the top-selling coursebook, seasoned historians Peter J. Bowler and Iwan Rhys Morus expand on their authoritative survey of how the development of science has shaped our world. Exploring both the history of science and its influence on modern thought, the authors chronicle the major developments in scientific thinking, from the revolutionary ideas of the seventeenth century to contemporary issues in genetics, physics, and more. Designed for entry-level college courses and as a single-volume introduction for the general reader, this book presents the history of science not as a series of names and dates but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships joining science and society. Thoroughly revised and expanded, the second edition draws on the latest research and scholarship. It also contains two entirely new chapters: one that explores the impact of computing on the development of science and another that surveys the complex interaction of Western science with the cultures of the rest of the world.
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Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science

This book provides a welcome reorientation to our understanding of the making of the modern sciences globally by emphasizing the centrality of domesticity in diverse scientific enterprises.

Author: Donald L. Opitz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137492739

Category: Science

Page: 299

View: 551

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The history of the modern sciences has long overlooked the significance of domesticity as a physical, social, and symbolic force in the shaping of knowledge production. This book provides a welcome reorientation to our understanding of the making of the modern sciences globally by emphasizing the centrality of domesticity in diverse scientific enterprises.
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Making Modern Science

Written by seasoned historians, this book will encourage students to see the history of science not as a series of names and dates but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships between science and modern society.

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226068609

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 572

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The development of science, according to respected scholars Peter J. Bowler and Iwan Rhys Morus, expands our knowledge and control of the world in ways that affect-but are also affected by-society and culture. In Making Modern Science, a text designed for introductory college courses in the history of science and as a single-volume introduction for the general reader, Bowler and Morus explore both the history of science itself and its influence on modern thought. Opening with an introduction that explains developments in the history of science over the last three decades and the controversies these initiatives have engendered, the book then proceeds in two parts. The first section considers key episodes in the development of modern science, including the Scientific Revolution and individual accomplishments in geology, physics, and biology. The second section is an analysis of the most important themes stemming from the social relations of science-the discoveries that force society to rethink its religious, moral, or philosophical values. Making Modern Science thus chronicles all major developments in scientific thinking, from the revolutionary ideas of the seventeenth century to the contemporary issues of evolutionism, genetics, nuclear physics, and modern cosmology. Written by seasoned historians, this book will encourage students to see the history of science not as a series of names and dates but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships between science and modern society. The first survey of its kind, Making Modern Science is a much-needed and accessible introduction to the history of science, engagingly written for undergraduates and curious readers alike.
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Nature s Body

Winner of the Ludwik Fleck Book Prize, Society for Social Studies of Science, 1995 "Schiebinger lays bare the cultural narratives that mix so easily with science.

Author: Londa L. Schiebinger

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 081353531X

Category: Medical

Page: 289

View: 106

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Winner of the Ludwik Fleck Book Prize, Society for Social Studies of Science, 1995 "Schiebinger lays bare the cultural narratives that mix so easily with science. They are at the same time hilarious and eerie, silly and profoundly disturbing. Schiebinger is brilliant in showing how tales of gender and race are told in other guises."--Thomas Laqueur, author of Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud "[Nature's Body] is so wonderfully humorous and is done with such careful attention to detail, the reader cannot help but see the profound implications of the history of science for modern science. Indispensable for all anthropologists, historians, philosophers, and practitioners of science."--Emily Martin, author of The Woman in the Body Eighteenth-century natural historians created a peculiar, and peculiarly durable, vision of nature--one that embodied the sexual and racial tensions of that era. When plants were found to reproduce sexually, eighteenth-century botanists ascribed to them passionate relations, polyandrous marriages, and suicidal incest, and accounts of steamy plant sex began to infiltrate the botanical literature of the day. Naturalists also turned their attention to the great apes just becoming known to eighteenth-century Europeans, clothing the females in silk vestments and training them to sip tea with the modest demeanor of English matrons, while imagining the males of the species fully capable of ravishing women. Written with humor and meticulous detail, Nature's Body draws on these and other examples to uncover the ways in which assumptions about gender, sex, and race have shaped scientific explanations of nature. Schiebinger offers a rich cultural history of science and a timely and passionate argument that science must be restructured in order to get it right.
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Music and the Making of Modern Science

This work presents the 'scientific revolution' more as a phase in the restoration and augmentation of the ancient project of musicalizing the world than a change in the basic project of natural philosophy.

Author: Peter Pesic

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262027274

Category: Music

Page: 360

View: 306

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In the natural science of ancient Greece, music formed the meeting place between numbers and perception; for the next two millennia, Pesic tells us in Music and the Making of Modern Science, "liberal education" connected music with arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy within a fourfold study, the quadrivium. Peter Pesic argues provocatively that music has had a formative effect on the development of modern science -- that music has been not just a charming accompaniment to thought but a conceptual force in its own right. Pesic explores a series of episodes in which music influenced science, moments in which prior developments in music arguably affected subsequent aspects of natural science. He describes encounters between harmony and fifteenth-century cosmological controversies, between musical initiatives and irrational numbers, between vibrating bodies and the emergent electromagnetism. He offers lively accounts of how Newton applied the musical scale to define the colors in the spectrum; how Euler and others applied musical ideas to develop the wave theory of light; and how a harmonium prepared Max Planck to find a quantum theory that reengaged the mathematics of vibration. Taken together, these cases document the peculiar power of music -- its autonomous force as a stream of experience, capable of stimulating insights different from those mediated by the verbal and the visual. An innovative e-book edition available for iOS devices will allow sound examples to be played by a touch and shows the score in a moving line.
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Making Modern Science Second Edition

If the results paint a more complex and realistic picture of how science works, anyone engaged in modern scientific research ought to recognize the value of ...

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226365930

Category: Science

Page: 608

View: 380

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In this new edition of the top-selling coursebook, seasoned historians Peter J. Bowler and Iwan Rhys Morus expand on their authoritative survey of how the development of science has shaped our world. Exploring both the history of science and its influence on modern thought, the authors chronicle the major developments in scientific thinking, from the revolutionary ideas of the seventeenth century to contemporary issues in genetics, physics, and more. Thoroughly revised and expanded, the second edition draws on the latest research and scholarship. It also contains two entirely new chapters: one that explores the impact of computing on the development of science, and another that shows how the West used science and technology as tools for geopolitical expansion. Designed for entry-level college courses and as a single-volume introduction for the general reader, Making Modern Science presents the history of science not as a series of names and dates, but as an interconnected and complex web of relationships joining science and society.
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The Realities of Reality Part II Making Sense of Why Modern Science Advances Volume 2 of 2

(Jacobsen, 2014) Because this book is about what makes modern science progress, I will not consider the ethical aspect of Operation Paperclip for now.

Author: Fritz Dufour, MBA, DESS

Publisher: Fritz Dufour

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 204

View: 515

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The difference between Part I and Part II – Volumes 1 & 2 – of this series, is that in Part I the author showed how what we call reality starts with the inner self whereas Part II describes what, in fact, impacts and modifies the environment or reality and what are the factors behind that dynamics. What impacts and modifies the environment is science. This Volume 2 starts by showing how technology plays an important role in scientific progress. Although the relationship between the two is symbiotic, science can exist without technology but technology desperately needs science. Military technology is an example of how technology can help science advance. Some military inventions end up having civilian use. Science being at the center of society, the book makes the case for the direct impact of such social sciences as politics and economics on the advancement of science. Politics, says the author, influences science because of uncertainty in science, and economics does it thanks to the availability of money to scholars and scientists for their research. On the other hand, government also influences scientific progress through regulations. The book gives cyberspace regulation as an example. Furthermore, by showing how art influences science, the author really argues for the polyfactorial aspect of scientific progress. In that line of thought, he goes on to also prove that factors such as skepticism, curiosity, and the quest for knowledge greatly influence the advancement of science. That, says the author, “is a ninety-degree turn … By ending Part two that way, I wanted to, somehow, link it to Part I, which argues that reality starts from within.”
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The Making of Modern Science

scientists see each other, and are perceived. Butterfield also wrote about the origins of modern science, an intellectual revolution that he perceived as ...

Author: David Knight

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780745657998

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 544

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Of all the inventions of the nineteenth century, the scientist is one of the most striking. In revolutionary France the science student, taught by men active in research, was born; and a generation later, the graduate student doing a PhD emerged in Germany. In 1833 the word 'scientist' was coined; forty years later science (increasingly specialised) was a becoming a profession. Men of science rivalled clerics and critics as sages; they were honoured as national treasures, and buried in state funerals. Their new ideas invigorated the life of the mind. Peripatetic congresses, great exhibitions, museums, technical colleges and laboratories blossomed; and new industries based on chemistry and electricity brought prosperity and power, economic and military. Eighteenth-century steam engines preceded understanding of the physics underlying them; but electric telegraphs and motors were applied science, based upon painstaking interpretation of nature. The ideas, discoveries and inventions of scientists transformed the world: lives were longer and healthier, cities and empires grew, societies became urban rather than agrarian, the local became global. And by the opening years of the twentieth century, science was spreading beyond Europe and North America, and women were beginning to be visible in the ranks of scientists. Bringing together the people, events, and discoveries of this exciting period into a lively narrative, this book will be essential reading both for students of the history of science and for anyone interested in the foundations of the world as we know it today.
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Immunology The Making of a Modern Science

The Making of a Modern Science Richard B. Gallagher, Jean Gilder, ... Science and application of science are linked together as a fruit is to the tree that ...

Author: Richard B. Gallagher

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780080534534

Category: Medical

Page: 246

View: 332

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Immunology has progressed in spectacular fashion in the last four decades. Studies of the response to infectious agents, transplanted organs and tumours (and the potential to manipulate that response), and the study of the immune system as a model system in molecular cell biology have yielded dramatic advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of immunity. The field has attracted a continuous stream of the brightest theoretical and experimental scientists for over forty years. This book conveys the philosophies and approaches of sixteen of the most successful of these scientists in the form of a series of narratives that describe the circumstances that led to a major discovery in immunology. Contributors not only recall an exciting period of research that helped shape modern immunology, but set it in the personal context of place and time. Jacques Miller, for example, describes the discovery of the function of the thymus, Rolf Zinkernagel explains how experiments on viral immunity led to the discovery of MHC restriction and Susumu Tonegawa provides an account of how antibody gene structure was defined. Medically-important discoveries include descriptions of early studies of autoimmunity by Noel Rose and of tumour immunology by George and Eva Klein. Far from being a collection of disinterested, historical accounts, this volume comprises a series of passionately biographical, personal essays that provide an unusually intimate insight into the scientific process. This book will be essential, and fascinating, reading for all those with an interest in immunology, and in the life sciences in general. For students and teachers, this will provide the background necessary for a true understanding of immunology, and to place subsequent discoveries in perspective.
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The Birth of Modern Science

This passionate book will enable readers to engage with the complex relationship of science and philosophy.

Author: Paolo Rossi

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 0631227113

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 351

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This history of the birth of modern science shatters the illusion that science is 'dry' and divorced from culture by exploring the powerful clashes between traditions and value systems that gave rise to it. The author shows how many of the characteristics that distinguish science today emerged in the midst of the wars and plagues of the seventeenth century and defines what was new about this form of knowledge.
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The Realities of Reality Part II Making Sense of Why Modern Science Advances Volume 1

Kuhn himself argues that science does make progress. New paradigms can be judged superior to old by standards such as scope and simplicity.

Author: Fritz Dufour, MBA, DESS

Publisher: Fritz Dufour

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 249

View: 947

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This Volume 1 of Part II considers the factors that make science progress. It lays out the differences between normal science and pseudoscience by showing the importance of the scientific method in the advancement of science. It introduces the concept of Truth in science by raising the point that even though truth is based on the scientific method, can science be true? Can it depict reality? The author focuses on modern science, which, he thinks, was born thanks to the Scientific Revolution which started with Galileo Galilei and led to the Industrial Revolution. The impacts of the latter is analyzed in light modernism, modernization, and modernity, all three linked to scientific progress. The book also talks about the Newtonian scientific leap – by analyzing particularly the then social and political fabrics of England – and Albert Einstein by showing how he changed history. According to the author, our very physical world can help us understand scientific progress. So, he explains, among other things, the structure of atoms and molecules, the role of physics in the understanding of our universe, Quantum Mechanics, and the importance of Higgs-Boson. On the other hand, the book is a stunning revelation of how important information is to scientific progress. To make his point, the author, first, talks about John Vincent Atanasoff as the Father of computer thanks to the invention of his ABC computer and then, Alan Turing as the Father of modern computer thanks to his Turing Test and his views on Artificial Intelligence. Both men played a momentous role in the Digital Revolution and in the Information Age, according to the book. Finally, the author talks about nanotechnology, which explores the world of small, meaning at the atomic and the molecular levels and is an inescapable tool in the molecular biology revolution which, itself, is an important factor in scientific progress and in transhumanism or human enhancement defined as the ideology according to which man can surpass his present state by improving his genetic material.
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Postmodern Winemaking

His lively exploration of the facets of postmodern winemaking, together with profiles of some of its practitioners, is both entertaining and enlightening. "I love this book: it’s brave, provocative, and fun.

Author: Clark Smith

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520282599

Category: Cooking

Page: 368

View: 818

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In Postmodern Winemaking, Clark Smith shares the extensive knowledge he has accumulated in engaging, humorous, and erudite essays that convey a new vision of the winemaker's craft--one that credits the crucial roles played by both science and art in the winemaking process. Smith, a leading innovator in red wine production techniques, explains how traditional enological education has led many winemakers astray--enabling them to create competent, consistent wines while putting exceptional wines of structure and mystery beyond their grasp. Great wines, he claims, demand a personal and creative engagement with many elements of the process. His lively exploration of the facets of postmodern winemaking, together with profiles of some of its practitioners, is both entertaining and enlightening.
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The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science

By virtue of its place of birth, modern science can be described as Western; by virtue of the component elements that went into making modern science ...

Author: A. Bala

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230601215

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 342

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Arun Bala challenges Eurocentric conceptions of history by showing how Chinese, Indian, Arabic, and ancient Egyptian ideas in philosophy, mathematics, cosmology and physics played an indispensable role in making possible the birth of modern science.
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The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing

Science.

Author: Richard Dawkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199216819

Category: Science

Page: 419

View: 919

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An anthology of diverse and inspiring pieces to browse and to treasure. It shows the many of the best scientists have displayed as much imagination and skill with the pen as in the laboratory.
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Culture and the Making of Identity in Contemporary India

Emergence of a Polemic: The Debate on Scientific Temper In 1981, ... The only desirable alternative in this view is to make modern science and technology ...

Author: Kamala Ganesh

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780761933816

Category: Social Science

Page: 274

View: 603

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This collection of 17 original essays, provides insights into the many ways in which the interrelated issues of culture, identity and `Indianness' are expressed in contemporary times. The contributors map and evaluate the developments in their respective fields over the past 50 years and cover the topics of art, music, theatre, literature, philosophy, science, history and feminism.
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The Knowledge Machine

'A stylish and accessible investigation into the nature of the scientific method' Nigel Warburton, Philosophy Bites 'This elegant book takes us to the heart of the scientific enterprise' David Papineau, King's College London, author of ...

Author: Michael Strevens

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241205792

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 470

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Rich with tales of discovery from Galileo to general relativity, a stimulating and timely analysis of how science works and why we need it. 'The best introduction to the scientific enterprise that I know. A wonderful and important book' David Wootton, author of The Invention of Science It is only in the last three centuries that the formidable knowledge-making machine we call modern science has transformed our way of life and our vision of the universe - two thousand years after the invention of law, philosophy, drama and mathematics. Why did we take so long to invent science? And how has it proved to be so powerful? The Knowledge Machine gives a radical answer, exploring how science calls on its practitioners to do something apparently irrational: strip away all previous knowledge - such as theological, metaphysical or political beliefs - and channel unprecedented energy into observation and experiment. In times of climate extremes, novel diseases and rapidly advancing technology, Strevens contends that we need more than ever to grasp the inner workings of our knowledge machine. 'A stylish and accessible investigation into the nature of the scientific method' Nigel Warburton, Philosophy Bites 'This elegant book takes us to the heart of the scientific enterprise' David Papineau, King's College London, author of Knowing the Score 'This book is a delight to read, richly illustrated with wonderfully told incidents from the history of natural science' Nancy Cartwright, University of California San Diego
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Science for All

Peter J. Bowler surveys the books, serial works, magazines, and newspapers published between 1900 and the outbreak of World War II to show that practicing scientists were very active in writing about their work for a general readership.

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226068664

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 519

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Recent scholarship has revealed that pioneering Victorian scientists endeavored through voluminous writing to raise public interest in science and its implications. But it has generally been assumed that once science became a profession around the turn of the century, this new generation of scientists turned its collective back on public outreach. Science for All debunks this apocryphal notion. Peter J. Bowler surveys the books, serial works, magazines, and newspapers published between 1900 and the outbreak of World War II to show that practicing scientists were very active in writing about their work for a general readership. Science for All argues that the social environment of early twentieth-century Britain created a substantial market for science books and magazines aimed at those who had benefited from better secondary education but could not access higher learning. Scientists found it easy and profitable to write for this audience, Bowler reveals, and because their work was seen as educational, they faced no hostility from their peers. But when admission to colleges and universities became more accessible in the 1960s, this market diminished and professional scientists began to lose interest in writing at the nonspecialist level. Eagerly anticipated by scholars of scientific engagement throughout the ages, Science for All sheds light on our own era and the continuing tension between science and public understanding.
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